Top 69 Slang For Opinion – Meaning & Usage

Opinions are like belly buttons, everyone has one. But how do you express your thoughts in a way that’s hip and trendy? Look no further! We’ve curated a list of the coolest and most popular slang terms for expressing your opinion. From “spilling the tea” to “throwing shade,” we’ve got you covered. Get ready to up your opinion game and become the ultimate opinionista!

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1. Ghosted

When someone “ghosts” you, it means they suddenly stop responding to your messages or calls without any explanation or warning. It can happen in various relationships, such as friendships or romantic connections.

  • For example, “I thought we were getting along well, but then he ghosted me out of nowhere.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t understand why she ghosted me after our date. It’s so disrespectful.”
  • Someone might share, “I’ve been ghosted by multiple job applicants. It’s frustrating and unprofessional.”

2. Salty

When someone is described as “salty,” it means they are angry, bitter, or resentful about something. It can also refer to someone who is being rude or sarcastic.

  • For instance, “He got salty when I beat him in the game.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t be so salty just because you didn’t get what you wanted.”
  • Someone might comment, “The salty remarks from that politician were unnecessary and unproductive.”

3. On point

When something is described as “on point,” it means it is accurate, well-stated, or precisely what is needed or expected.

  • For example, “Her analysis of the situation was on point.”
  • A person might say, “Your presentation was on point. You covered all the important aspects.”
  • Someone might comment, “The chef’s flavors were on point. Every dish was perfectly balanced.”

4. Woke

When someone is described as “woke,” it means they are aware and informed about social issues, especially those related to racial and social justice.

  • For instance, “She is a woke activist who fights for equality.”
  • A person might say, “It’s important to stay woke and educate ourselves about systemic racism.”
  • Someone might comment, “Being woke means understanding and challenging societal norms.”

5. Goat

When someone or something is referred to as the “goat,” it means they are considered the greatest of all time in their field or category.

  • For example, “Michael Jordan is often called the basketball goat.”
  • A person might say, “She’s the goat when it comes to singing. Her voice is unmatched.”
  • Someone might comment, “The goat of comedy is subjective, but many consider Richard Pryor to be the best.”

6. Newbie

This term refers to someone who is new to a particular activity or community. It is often used to describe someone who is inexperienced or unfamiliar with the subject matter.

  • For example, in an online gaming forum, a user might say, “Don’t worry, we were all newbies once.”
  • In a discussion about a new hobby, someone might ask, “Any tips for a newbie like me?”
  • A person might comment on a beginner’s progress by saying, “You’re doing great for a newbie!”

7. Peeps

This slang term is a shortened form of the word “people” and is used to refer to a person or group of people.

  • For instance, a user might ask, “What do my peeps think about this?”
  • In a conversation about a social event, someone might say, “I’m inviting all my peeps to the party.”
  • A person might refer to their friends as their “peeps” by saying,“peeps” by saying, “I’m going out with my peeps tonight.”

8. Rents

This slang term is a shortened form of the word “parents” and is used to refer to one’s mother and father.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going home to visit the rents this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family dynamics, someone might say, “My rents are strict, but they mean well.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Are your rents coming to the graduation ceremony?”

9. Sweet

This term is used to express approval or excitement about something. It is often used to describe something that is enjoyable, impressive, or cool.

  • For instance, if someone shares good news, a user might comment, “That’s sweet!”
  • In a discussion about a new movie, someone might say, “I heard it’s really sweet.”
  • A person might describe a delicious dessert by saying, “This cake is so sweet!”

10. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to a very close friend or group of friends. It implies a strong bond and long-lasting friendship.

  • For example, a person might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “Me and my BFF.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “I’ve known my BFF since elementary school.”
  • A person might refer to their closest group of friends as their “BFFs” by saying,“BFFs” by saying, “I’m going on vacation with my BFFs next week.”

11. Chillax

A combination of the words “chill” and “relax,” it means to take it easy or unwind. It’s often used to tell someone to calm down or not to worry.

  • For example, “Hey, chillax, there’s no need to stress about it.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m just going to chillax at home this weekend.”
  • Another might comment, “After a long day at work, I like to chillax with a good book.”

12. Shook

This word is used to describe a feeling of surprise or shock, often in an exaggerated manner. It can also be used to express being emotionally affected or deeply moved.

  • For instance, “I’m shook! I can’t believe she won the competition.”
  • Someone might say, “That movie ending left me shook.”
  • Another might comment, “The news of their breakup really shook me.”

13. Lit

This slang term is used to describe something that is cool, exciting, or amazing. It can be used to describe events, experiences, or even people.

  • For example, “The party last night was lit!”
  • Someone might say, “Her performance on stage was absolutely lit.”
  • Another might comment, “This new album is fire, every track is lit.”

14. Fleek

This word is used to describe something that is on point or perfect. It is often used to compliment someone’s appearance, style, or overall presentation.

  • For instance, “Her eyebrows are on fleek!”
  • Someone might say, “Your outfit is on fleek today.”
  • Another might comment, “The decorations for the party are totally on fleek.”

15. Slaps

This word is used to describe something that is great or excellent. It is often used to describe music or a song that is particularly enjoyable or has a catchy beat.

  • For example, “This song slaps, I can’t stop dancing.”
  • Someone might say, “The new album from that artist slaps, every track is amazing.”
  • Another might comment, “The beat of this song really slaps, it’s so catchy.”

16. Facts

This slang term is used to emphasize or validate a statement or opinion. It implies that the information being shared is indisputable or based on solid evidence.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s the best singer, no doubt. Facts!”
  • In a political discussion, a person might assert, “Climate change is real, and the facts support it.”
  • Another might respond to a controversial statement with, “Those are alternative facts, not real facts.”

17. Fire

When something is described as “fire,” it means it is exceptionally good or impressive. This slang term is often used to express enthusiasm or admiration for something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “This song is fire! I can’t stop listening to it.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might exclaim, “That dish was fire! I need the recipe.”
  • Another might comment on a stunning outfit with, “You look absolutely fire in that dress!”

18. Stan

To “stan” someone or something means to be an extremely devoted fan. The term originated from an Eminem song called “Stan” and has since been used to describe fans who are passionate and dedicated to a particular artist, celebrity, or brand.

  • For example, a person might say, “I stan Taylor Swift. I’ve been to all her concerts and know every lyric.”
  • In a discussion about a TV show, someone might declare, “I’m a Game of Thrones stan. I’ve read all the books and watched every episode.”
  • Another might express their admiration for a sports team by saying, “I’m a lifelong Lakers stan. I never miss a game.”

19. Tea

In slang terms, “tea” refers to gossip or information that is being shared. It can also be used to describe a juicy or scandalous piece of information.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Spill the tea! What’s the latest gossip?”
  • In a conversation about celebrities, a person might ask, “Have you heard any tea about that famous couple?”
  • Another might share an interesting story with, “I’ve got some tea to share. You won’t believe what happened at work today.”

20. G.O.A.T.

This acronym stands for “Greatest of All Time” and is used to describe someone or something that is considered the best or most exceptional in their field.

  • For example, a sports fan might say, “Michael Jordan is the G.O.A.T. of basketball.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might argue, “Beyoncé is the G.O.A.T. She’s a true icon.”
  • Another might praise a legendary actor by saying, “Meryl Streep is the G.O.A.T. of Hollywood. Her talent is unmatched.”

21. Hot take

A “hot take” is a strong or controversial opinion on a particular topic. It is often an unconventional viewpoint that goes against the mainstream or popular opinion.

  • For example, “My hot take is that pineapple belongs on pizza.”
  • In a sports discussion, someone might offer a hot take like, “LeBron James is overrated.”
  • A person might share their hot take on social media by saying, “I know this is a hot take, but I actually enjoyed the last season of Game of Thrones.”

22. Two cents

“Two cents” is a phrase used to express one’s personal opinion on a matter. It implies that the opinion being shared is of little value or importance, as if the person is just tossing in their two cents.

  • For instance, “Here’s my two cents: I think we should focus on renewable energy.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “I’ll throw in my two cents and say that healthcare should be a basic right.”
  • A person might add their two cents to a debate by saying, “As a parent, my two cents is that schools should prioritize mental health services.”

23. POV

“POV” stands for “point of view” and is used to share one’s perspective or opinion on a particular topic. It is often used in online discussions or social media posts.

  • For example, “Here’s my POV on the matter: we need stricter gun control laws.”
  • In a movie review, someone might say, “From my POV, the ending was disappointing.”
  • A person might preface their comment with “POV” to make it clear they are sharing their opinion,“POV” to make it clear they are sharing their opinion, such as “POV: I think cats are better than dogs.”

24. IMO

IMO is an acronym for “in my opinion” and is used to preface a statement or viewpoint that is based on the speaker’s personal perspective.

  • For instance, “IMO, chocolate ice cream is the best.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “IMO, everyone should have access to affordable healthcare.”
  • A person might start their comment with “IMO” to make it clear that they are sharing their personal opinion,“IMO” to make it clear that they are sharing their personal opinion, such as “IMO, this movie was a masterpiece.”

25. IMHO

IMHO is an acronym for “in my humble opinion” and is similar to IMO. It is used to express one’s opinion while also acknowledging that it may not be the only valid viewpoint.

  • For example, “IMHO, we should prioritize mental health awareness.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “IMHO, comfort should always come before style.”
  • A person might use “IMHO” to add their opinion to a conversation without sounding overly confident or arrogant,“IMHO” to add their opinion to a conversation without sounding overly confident or arrogant, such as “IMHO, this book is overrated.”

26. YMMV

This phrase is used to acknowledge that people may have different experiences or opinions about a particular topic. It’s often used when giving subjective advice or sharing personal experiences.

  • For example, “YMMV, but I found that this product worked really well for me.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “YMMV, but I thought the ending was a bit disappointing.”
  • Another person might comment, “YMMV, but I think this restaurant has the best pizza in town.”

27. TBH

This acronym is used to preface a statement that the speaker considers to be honest or sincere. It’s often used to provide an unfiltered opinion or to emphasize the truthfulness of a statement.

  • For instance, “TBH, I didn’t really enjoy the concert.”
  • When asked about a new haircut, someone might respond, “TBH, I think it doesn’t suit you.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might say, “TBH, I think both sides have valid points.”

28. FWIW

This phrase is used to introduce information or an opinion that may not be very valuable or significant, but is offered anyway. It’s often used to provide additional context or to share a different perspective.

  • For example, “FWIW, I heard that the store will be closing early tomorrow.”
  • In a debate about a political issue, someone might say, “FWIW, I think we should consider the long-term consequences.”
  • Another person might comment, “FWIW, I’ve tried that restaurant and wasn’t impressed.”

29. SMH

This acronym is used to express disbelief, disappointment, or disapproval. It’s often used in response to something foolish, ridiculous, or outrageous.

  • For instance, “SMH, I can’t believe they made such a stupid decision.”
  • When reading a news article about a celebrity scandal, someone might comment, “SMH, they never learn from their mistakes.”
  • In a discussion about an unfair policy, a person might say, “SMH, it’s just not right.”

30. HTH

This acronym is used to indicate that the speaker is providing information or advice in the hopes that it will be useful to the recipient. It’s often used in online forums or customer support interactions.

  • For example, “HTH, let me know if you have any other questions.”
  • When giving instructions for a DIY project, someone might say, “HTH, but make sure to wear protective goggles.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, a person might comment, “HTH, but I recommend doing some additional research.”

31. AFAIK

This phrase is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s knowledge or understanding, but may not be completely accurate or definitive.

  • For example, “AFAIK, the meeting is scheduled for next week, but I’ll double-check.”
  • In a discussion about a current event, someone might say, “AFAIK, the new law goes into effect tomorrow.”
  • Another might comment, “AFAIK, the restaurant has great reviews, so we should try it.”

32. IDK

This abbreviation is used to express uncertainty or lack of knowledge about a particular topic or question.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What time is the movie showing?” a person might respond, “IDK, I haven’t checked.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific concept, someone might admit, “IDK, I’m not familiar with that theory.”
  • Another might say, “IDK what the answer is, but we can look it up together.”

33. NGL

This phrase is used to preface a statement that may be unexpected or contrary to what is commonly believed. It is often used to express honesty or authenticity.

  • For example, “NGL, I was a bit disappointed with the ending of that movie.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “NGL, I can see both sides of the argument.”
  • Another might comment, “NGL, I was skeptical at first, but the new restaurant exceeded my expectations.”

34. BTW

This phrase is used to introduce additional or supplementary information that may not be directly related to the current topic of conversation.

  • For instance, “BTW, did you hear about the new coffee shop that opened downtown?”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might say, “BTW, there’s a concert happening on Saturday.”
  • Another might comment, “BTW, I’m bringing my dog to the park, so feel free to bring yours too.”

35. FYI

This phrase is used to share information or give a heads-up to someone without necessarily seeking a response or input from them.

  • For example, “FYI, the office will be closed next Monday for a public holiday.”
  • In a group chat, someone might send a message saying, “FYI, I’ll be running a few minutes late to the meeting.”
  • Another might comment, “FYI, there’s a new policy in place regarding expense reimbursements.”

36. ICYMI

Used to share something that may have been overlooked or not seen by others. It’s a way to bring attention to something interesting or important.

  • For example, “ICYMI, there’s a new trailer for the upcoming movie.”
  • A user might post, “ICYMI, the latest episode of the TV show aired last night.”
  • Another might say, “ICYMI, there’s a sale happening at the store this weekend.”

37. TL;DR

Used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or to express disinterest in reading a long post or article. It’s a way to provide a short summary or highlight the main points.

  • For instance, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of climate change on wildlife.”
  • A user might comment, “TL;DR version: The movie is a must-watch for action fans.”
  • Another might say, “TL;DR: The study found no significant difference between the two groups.”

38. WTH

An expression of surprise, shock, or confusion. It’s used to convey disbelief or frustration.

  • For example, “WTH is going on here?”
  • A user might comment, “WTH, I can’t believe they canceled the show.”
  • Another might say, “WTH, why would anyone do that?”

39. OMG

An expression of surprise, excitement, or disbelief. It’s used to convey strong emotions or astonishment.

  • For instance, “OMG, I can’t believe I won the lottery.”
  • A user might comment, “OMG, that sunset is absolutely breathtaking.”
  • Another might say, “OMG, I just met my favorite celebrity!”

40. IRL

Used to distinguish between online or virtual experiences and real-life experiences. It’s a way to emphasize that something is happening offline or in the physical world.

  • For example, “I met my online friend IRL for the first time.”
  • A user might comment, “IRL, the situation is much more complicated than it seems.”
  • Another might say, “IRL, the food doesn’t look as good as it does in the pictures.”

41. TBF

This acronym is often used to introduce a statement that provides a fair or balanced perspective on a topic.

  • For example, “TBF, both sides of the argument have valid points.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial issue, someone might say, “TBF, it’s important to consider the historical context.”
  • Another user might comment, “TBF, I can understand why some people feel strongly about this issue.”

42. TFW

This acronym is used to express a relatable feeling or emotion in response to a situation.

  • For instance, “TFW you finally finish a project you’ve been working on for months.”
  • In a discussion about a funny experience, someone might say, “TFW you accidentally send a text to the wrong person.”
  • Another user might comment, “TFW you see your favorite band perform live for the first time.”

43. NVM

This acronym is used to indicate that something previously mentioned is no longer relevant or important.

  • For example, “NVM, I found the information I was looking for.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “NVM, let’s just stay in tonight.”
  • Another user might comment, “NVM, I figured out the answer to my question.”

44. Thoughts and prayers

This phrase is often used sarcastically to criticize the perceived lack of action or effectiveness of offering thoughts and prayers in response to a tragedy or difficult situation.

  • For instance, “After yet another school shooting, all we get are thoughts and prayers.”
  • In a discussion about political inaction, someone might say, “Politicians love to offer thoughts and prayers, but where are the meaningful changes?”
  • Another user might comment, “Thoughts and prayers won’t solve the problem; we need real solutions.”

45. Soapbox

This term refers to a metaphorical platform or opportunity for someone to express their opinions or beliefs, often in a passionate or forceful manner.

  • For example, “He always jumps on his soapbox whenever the topic of politics comes up.”
  • In a discussion about activism, someone might say, “Taking to the streets can be a powerful way to get off the soapbox and create real change.”
  • Another user might comment, “I appreciate that she uses her platform as a celebrity to stand on the soapbox for important causes.”

46. Spill the tea

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to share juicy or scandalous information. It can also mean to reveal the truth about a situation or person.

  • For example, “Girl, spill the tea! What really happened at the party last night?”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe she spilled the tea about her ex-boyfriend.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might ask, “Can you spill the tea on what you really think about this issue?”

47. Speak your mind

This phrase encourages someone to openly share their thoughts or opinions without holding back. It emphasizes the importance of being honest and authentic in expressing oneself.

  • For instance, “Don’t be afraid to speak your mind, even if others disagree with you.”
  • A person might say, “I appreciate when people speak their mind, even if their views differ from mine.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might encourage others by saying, “Let’s go around the room and each speak our mind on this topic.”

48. Give your two cents

This phrase is used to ask someone for their opinion or advice on a particular matter. It implies that the person’s input is valuable and desired.

  • For example, “What do you think about this dress? Can you give your two cents?”
  • Someone might say, “I always appreciate when my friends give their two cents on important decisions.”
  • In a meeting, a colleague might ask, “Before we finalize the plan, can everyone give their two cents?”

49. Sound off

This phrase means to express one’s opinion in a strong and assertive manner. It often implies a sense of passion or conviction in one’s beliefs.

  • For instance, “He really sounded off about the government’s decision during the protest.”
  • A person might say, “I’m tired of people staying silent. It’s time to sound off about the issues that matter.”
  • In a heated debate, someone might declare, “I’m going to sound off and make sure my voice is heard.”

50. Take a stance

This phrase means to firmly establish and express one’s position or opinion on a particular issue. It emphasizes the importance of taking a clear and decisive stance rather than remaining neutral.

  • For example, “It’s time for you to take a stance on this matter and let your voice be heard.”
  • Someone might say, “I respect people who take a stance on important social issues.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might declare, “I’m taking a stance against discrimination and fighting for equality.”

51. Chime in

When someone chimes in, they are adding their opinion or input to a discussion or debate. It implies that the person is actively participating in the conversation.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “Feel free to chime in if you have any ideas.”
  • In an online forum, a user might comment, “I just wanted to chime in and say that I agree with the previous comment.”
  • During a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s hear what everyone else thinks. Don’t be afraid to chime in.”

52. Share your thoughts

This phrase is an invitation for someone to share their thoughts or opinions on a particular topic. It encourages open communication and encourages individuals to contribute their perspective.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to their students, “Take a moment to share your thoughts on the book we just read.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts on this issue.”
  • During a team meeting, a manager might ask, “Does anyone want to share their thoughts on the proposed project?”

53. Voice your opinion

To voice your opinion means to express your thoughts or beliefs on a particular matter. It is a call to action, urging individuals to speak up and share their perspective.

  • For example, during a town hall meeting, a politician might say, “I encourage each of you to voice your opinions on the proposed legislation.”
  • In a classroom discussion, a teacher might ask, “Who wants to voice their opinion on this topic?”
  • During a family dinner, someone might say, “We’re all here to voice our opinions and have a healthy debate.”

54. Put in your two cents

This phrase is a colloquial way of asking someone to share their opinion or contribute their thoughts on a particular topic. It suggests that the person’s input is valuable and adds to the conversation.

  • For instance, during a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Feel free to put in your two cents on any ideas.”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might add, “I just wanted to put in my two cents before we make a decision.”
  • During a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s go around the table and have everyone put in their two cents on this issue.”

55. State your case

When someone is asked to state their case, they are being invited to present their argument or point of view on a particular matter. It implies that the person should provide evidence or reasons to support their opinion.

  • For example, in a courtroom, a lawyer might say, “I now invite the defendant to state their case.”
  • During a debate, a moderator might ask, “Each candidate will have two minutes to state their case on this topic.”
  • In a business meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s go around the room and have everyone state their case before we make a decision.”

56. Lay it on the line

This phrase means to state your opinion in a straightforward and candid manner, without holding back.

  • For example, during a team meeting, a colleague might say, “I think we need to lay it on the line and address the issues affecting our productivity.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might declare, “I’m going to lay it on the line and tell you exactly where I stand on this issue.”
  • A friend might encourage you, “Don’t be afraid to lay it on the line and let them know how you really feel.”

57. Have your say

This phrase means to express your thoughts or perspective on a particular matter.

  • For instance, during a town hall meeting, the moderator might say, “We want to hear from the community, so please have your say.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a participant might assert, “Everyone should have their say and contribute to the conversation.”
  • A teacher might encourage students, “This is your chance to have your say and share your ideas with the class.”

58. Let your voice be heard

This phrase is an encouragement to express your thoughts and opinions openly and confidently.

  • For example, during a protest, a leader might say, “Let your voice be heard and stand up for what you believe in.”
  • In a community meeting, a participant might assert, “It’s important to let your voice be heard and advocate for positive change.”
  • A motivational speaker might inspire the audience, “Don’t be afraid to let your voice be heard and make a difference in the world.”

59. Weigh in

This phrase means to share your thoughts or perspective on a particular matter.

  • For instance, during a team meeting, a coworker might say, “I’d like everyone to weigh in on this proposal before we make a decision.”
  • In a debate, a participant might assert, “It’s important for all sides to weigh in and provide their arguments.”
  • A friend might ask for your input, “What do you think about this situation? I’d love for you to weigh in.”

60. Take a stand

This phrase means to assert a firm and unwavering opinion on a particular issue or topic.

  • For example, during a political rally, a speaker might say, “It’s time for us to take a stand and fight for what we believe in.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, a participant might declare, “We must take a stand against inequality and advocate for change.”
  • A mentor might encourage you, “Don’t be afraid to take a stand and defend your beliefs, even if they are unpopular.”

61. Speak out

To openly express your thoughts or beliefs on a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, “It’s important to speak out against injustice.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I encourage everyone to speak out and voice their opinions.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you willing to speak out and stand up for what you believe in?”

62. Give your take

To offer your personal opinion or viewpoint on a subject.

  • For instance, “What’s your take on the new movie?”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “I’ll give my take on the matter.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give your take on the current political situation?”

63. Offer your thoughts

To give your ideas, opinions, or suggestions on a particular topic.

  • For example, “Feel free to offer your thoughts on the matter.”
  • During a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s all offer our thoughts and see what we come up with.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you offer your thoughts on how to improve this project?”

64. Express your views

To communicate your opinions, beliefs, or perspectives on a specific matter.

  • For instance, “Everyone should have the freedom to express their views.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “I want to express my views on this topic.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you comfortable expressing your views in a public setting?”

65. Shoot your shot

To take a risk and share your thoughts or feelings, especially when there is uncertainty or potential rejection.

  • For example, “I’m going to shoot my shot and tell her how I feel.”
  • In a job interview, someone might say, “It’s important to shoot your shot and confidently showcase your skills.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you ready to shoot your shot and present your ideas to the team?”

66. Drop your opinion

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to express their thoughts or viewpoint on a particular topic. It implies that the person should freely and openly share their opinion without hesitation or reservation.

  • For example, during a group discussion, someone might say, “Hey, everyone, feel free to drop your opinion on this matter.”
  • In an online forum, a user might post, “I’m curious to hear what you all think about this. Drop your opinion below!”
  • A friend might ask, “We’re trying to decide on a vacation spot. Drop your opinion on where we should go.”

67. Throw in your two cents

This phrase is used to invite someone to contribute their thoughts or ideas to a conversation or discussion. It suggests that the person’s input is valuable and worth sharing, even if it may not have a significant impact on the overall outcome.

  • For instance, in a meeting, a colleague might say, “Before we wrap up, let’s go around the room and have everyone throw in their two cents.”
  • During a friendly debate, someone might interject, “Can I throw in my two cents on this topic?”
  • A family member might offer, “I’ve been thinking about this issue. Mind if I throw in my two cents?”

68. Lay down the law

This phrase is used to describe someone expressing their opinion or viewpoint with authority and conviction. It implies that the person is asserting their opinion as if they were enforcing a rule or making a firm decision.

  • For example, in a heated argument, someone might say, “I’m going to lay down the law here and tell you why I think you’re wrong.”
  • During a team meeting, a manager might assert, “Let me lay down the law on how we’re going to approach this project.”
  • A parent might declare, “I’m going to lay down the law and explain why you can’t go to that party.”

69. Put your stamp on it

This phrase is used to encourage someone to express their opinion or viewpoint in a way that leaves a lasting impression or impact. It suggests that the person should confidently and boldly assert their opinion, as if they were putting their personal mark or signature on it.

  • For instance, in a group discussion, someone might say, “Don’t be afraid to put your stamp on it and speak up about what you believe.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might encourage the audience, “Each of you has a unique perspective. Put your stamp on it and share your thoughts.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “This project is your chance to put your stamp on it and showcase your opinions.”
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