Top 51 Slang For Overwhelm – Meaning & Usage

Feeling overwhelmed with all the new slang terms popping up everywhere? You’re not alone! Navigating the ever-evolving world of slang can be a daunting task, but fear not! We’ve got you covered with a curated list of the top slang terms for overwhelm. Stay tuned to discover how to express that feeling of being swamped or inundated in the most trendy and relatable way possible. Let’s dive in and decode the language of stress together!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Swamped

When someone is swamped, it means they have a lot of work or tasks to complete and feel overwhelmed by the amount of work they have.

  • For example, “I’m swamped with assignments this week, I don’t know how I’m going to finish everything.”
  • Another example, “She’s been swamped with meetings all day, she hasn’t had a chance to take a break.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m swamped with work at the moment.”

2. Snowed under

When someone is snowed under, it means they are overwhelmed or buried by tasks or responsibilities and feel like they are unable to keep up with everything.

  • For instance, “I’m snowed under with work, I don’t have time for anything else.”
  • Another example, “He’s been snowed under with family obligations, he hasn’t had a moment to himself.”
  • A person might say, “I need help, I’m snowed under and feeling completely overwhelmed.”

3. Drowning

When someone is drowning, it means they feel overwhelmed or unable to cope with the amount of work or stress they are experiencing.

  • For example, “I’m drowning in deadlines, I need more time to complete everything.”
  • Another example, “She’s been drowning in responsibilities, she needs a break.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel like I’m drowning, there’s just too much going on right now.”

4. Buried

When someone is buried, it means they are overwhelmed or buried by tasks or responsibilities and feel like they are unable to keep up with everything.

  • For instance, “I’m buried under a mountain of paperwork, I don’t know where to start.”
  • Another example, “He’s been buried with work, he hasn’t had a chance to take a break.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t take on any more projects, I’m already buried with work.”

5. In over your head

When someone is in over their head, it means they are overwhelmed or out of their depth in a particular situation or task.

  • For example, “I thought I could handle it, but I’m in over my head.”
  • Another example, “She’s been struggling with the project, she’s in over her head.”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t know what I’m doing, I feel like I’m in over my head.”

6. Flooded

To be overwhelmed or inundated with a large amount of something.

  • For example, “I’m flooded with work right now, I don’t know how I’ll get it all done.”
  • A student might say, “I’m flooded with assignments and exams this week.”
  • Someone overwhelmed by social obligations might exclaim, “My schedule is flooded with parties and events!”

7. Overloaded

To have too much to handle or deal with.

  • For instance, “I’m overloaded with responsibilities at work, I need some help.”
  • A student might say, “I’m overloaded with homework, I don’t have time for anything else.”
  • Someone overwhelmed by emotions might confess, “I’m overloaded with stress and anxiety.”

8. Bombarded

To be constantly and overwhelmingly attacked or overwhelmed with information or tasks.

  • For example, “I’m bombarded with emails every day, it’s hard to keep up.”
  • A person overwhelmed by advertisements might complain, “I’m bombarded with ads everywhere I go.”
  • Someone overwhelmed by negative comments might say, “I’m bombarded with criticism and hate on social media.”

9. Suffocating

To feel trapped or overwhelmed, as if unable to breathe or escape from a situation.

  • For instance, “I’m suffocating under the weight of my responsibilities.”
  • A person overwhelmed by a toxic relationship might confess, “I feel suffocated by their constant demands and control.”
  • Someone overwhelmed by financial stress might exclaim, “I’m suffocated by debt and bills!”

10. Inundated

To be overwhelmed or flooded with a large amount of something.

  • For example, “I’m inundated with requests for help, I can’t keep up.”
  • A person overwhelmed by tasks might say, “I’m inundated with work, I don’t have time for anything else.”
  • Someone overwhelmed by messages might exclaim, “I’m inundated with notifications and texts!”

11. Sinking

This term is used to describe the feeling of being overwhelmed or defeated by a situation or task.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I feel like I’m sinking.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult project, someone might say, “I’m sinking under the weight of all these deadlines.”
  • A student might express their stress by saying, “I’m sinking in all this coursework.”

12. Crushed

To be “crushed” means to be overwhelmed or defeated by a situation or task.

  • For instance, “I was completely crushed by the amount of work I had to do.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging game, someone might say, “That level crushed me.”
  • A person overwhelmed by responsibilities might say, “I feel crushed under the weight of all these obligations.”

13. Struggling

To be “struggling” means to have difficulty coping or managing a situation or task.

  • For example, “I’m really struggling to keep up with all my assignments.”
  • In a conversation about a tough workout, someone might say, “I was struggling to finish that last set.”
  • A person overwhelmed by personal issues might say, “I’m struggling to find balance in my life right now.”

14. Running ragged

To be “running ragged” means to be exhausted from being overwhelmed by tasks or responsibilities.

  • For instance, “I’ve been running ragged trying to meet all these deadlines.”
  • In a discussion about a busy schedule, someone might say, “I feel like I’ve been running ragged all week.”
  • A person overwhelmed by work might express their exhaustion by saying, “I’ve been running ragged trying to keep up with everything.”

15. Maxed out

To be “maxed out” means to have reached the limit of one’s capacity, often in terms of time, energy, or resources.

  • For example, “I’m maxed out with work right now, I can’t take on any more projects.”
  • In a conversation about a busy schedule, someone might say, “I’m maxed out with appointments this week.”
  • A person overwhelmed by financial obligations might say, “I’m maxed out on my credit cards.”

16. Stressed to the max

This phrase is used to describe a state of being extremely overwhelmed or stressed out. It implies that the person is experiencing an intense level of stress or pressure.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m stressed to the max.”
  • A student might say, “With exams coming up, I’m feeling stressed to the max.”
  • Someone might vent, “I can’t handle all these responsibilities, I’m constantly stressed to the max.”

17. Overwhelmed

This term is used to describe a feeling of being completely overcome by a situation or task. It suggests that the person is unable to cope with the amount or intensity of what they are facing.

  • For instance, “I’m so overwhelmed with work right now.”
  • A person might say, “I feel overwhelmed by all the responsibilities on my plate.”
  • Someone might express, “The amount of information I need to learn is overwhelming me.”

18. Freaking out

This phrase is used to describe a state of panicking or becoming extremely anxious in response to a situation. It implies a loss of control or composure due to being overwhelmed.

  • For example, “I’m freaking out about this upcoming presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m freaking out because I have so much to do and not enough time.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I’m freaking out about the amount of money I owe.”

19. Losing it

This term is used to describe a state of becoming mentally or emotionally overwhelmed. It suggests that the person is on the verge of losing control or composure due to the intensity of their emotions.

  • For instance, “I’m so stressed, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so overwhelmed with everything going on, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • Someone might express, “I’m on the brink of losing it because of all the pressure.”

20. Going crazy

This phrase is used to describe a feeling of being mentally overwhelmed or losing control over one’s thoughts or emotions. It suggests a state of extreme confusion or distress.

  • For example, “I have so much on my plate, I feel like I’m going crazy.”
  • A person might say, “The constant stress is driving me to the point of going crazy.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I can’t handle this anymore, I’m going crazy.”

21. Engulfed

To be completely overwhelmed or inundated with tasks or responsibilities. The term “engulfed” implies being surrounded or consumed by a large volume of work or obligations.

  • For example, “I was engulfed with work after my colleague went on vacation.”
  • A student might say, “I feel like I’m engulfed with assignments and exams.”
  • Someone might express their overwhelmed state by stating, “I’m completely engulfed in this project and can’t take on anything else right now.”

22. Bombshell

To be completely taken aback or overwhelmed by surprising or unexpected news or information. The term “bombshell” carries the connotation of a sudden and powerful impact, leaving one stunned or speechless.

  • For instance, “When she found out about the betrayal, it was a bombshell that left her overwhelmed.”
  • A person might say, “The announcement of the company’s bankruptcy was a bombshell for the employees.”
  • Another might express their overwhelmed state by saying, “The bombshell revelation in the documentary left viewers speechless.”

23. Clobbered

To be defeated or overwhelmed, often in a sudden or forceful manner. The term “clobbered” suggests being hit or struck with great force, leaving one unable to effectively respond or recover.

  • For example, “The team was clobbered by their opponents, leaving them overwhelmed and demoralized.”
  • A person might say, “I was clobbered with work today and couldn’t catch a break.”
  • Another might express their overwhelmed state by stating, “I feel like life has clobbered me with one challenge after another.”

24. Overwrought

To be emotionally or mentally overwhelmed, often due to excessive worry or anxiety. The term “overwrought” implies being in a state of heightened emotional tension or distress.

  • For instance, “She became overwrought with worry when her child didn’t come home on time.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling overwrought with all the deadlines and pressure at work.”
  • Another might express their overwhelmed state by stating, “The constant demands and expectations have left me overwrought and exhausted.”

25. Overburdened

To be excessively loaded or burdened with tasks, responsibilities, or obligations. The term “overburdened” suggests carrying a heavy load, both physically and metaphorically, resulting in a feeling of being overwhelmed.

  • For example, “The caregiver was overburdened with the demands of taking care of multiple patients.”
  • A person might say, “I feel overburdened with all the expectations and responsibilities placed on me.”
  • Another might express their overwhelmed state by stating, “The never-ending to-do list has left me overburdened and drained.”

26. Overwhelmified

This term is a playful and informal way to describe the state of being overwhelmed. It emphasizes the intensity and magnitude of the feeling.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m completely overwhelmified.”
  • When faced with a daunting task, someone might say, “I’m feeling overwhelmified, but I’ll get through it.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The amount of information to study for this exam has me overwhelmified!”

27. Out of one’s depth

This phrase is used when someone is in a situation that is beyond their capabilities or knowledge. It conveys a sense of being overwhelmed and outmatched.

  • For instance, if someone is asked to give a presentation on a topic they know nothing about, they might say, “I’m completely out of my depth.”
  • In a challenging work environment, someone might admit, “I feel out of my depth with this new project.”
  • A person might confess, “I tried to fix my car myself, but I quickly realized I was out of my depth.”

28. Outnumbered

This term is used when someone is overwhelmed by a larger opposing force or group. It implies a sense of being overwhelmed because of being outnumbered.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “I felt outnumbered by all the opposing arguments.”
  • In a team sport, a player might admit, “We were outnumbered on the field, and it was hard to keep up.”
  • A person might say, “I was outnumbered by my siblings, so I had to learn to stand my ground.”

29. Overworked

This term describes the feeling of being overwhelmed due to an excessive workload or responsibilities. It suggests a sense of being stretched too thin.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m feeling overworked with all the deadlines and assignments.”
  • In a high-pressure job, a person might admit, “I’m constantly overworked and struggling to find work-life balance.”
  • A student might complain, “I’m overworked with extracurricular activities, part-time job, and schoolwork.”

30. Exhausted

While not specific to overwhelm, this term is often used to describe the physical and emotional exhaustion that can come from being overwhelmed. It suggests a state of being completely spent.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m so overwhelmed with everything going on, I’m completely exhausted.”
  • After a long day of work, a person might admit, “I’m too exhausted to do anything else.”
  • A student might say, “I’m overwhelmed with studying, and it’s leaving me mentally and physically exhausted.”

31. Zonked

This slang term is used to describe feeling extremely tired or worn out. It can also refer to being mentally or physically overwhelmed.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I feel completely zonked.”
  • A person might say, “I stayed up all night studying for the exam, and now I’m zonked.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I have so much to do, I’m zonked just thinking about it.”

32. Wiped out

This phrase is often used to describe feeling completely exhausted or overwhelmed, both physically and mentally.

  • For instance, “After running a marathon, I was wiped out.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working non-stop for days, and I’m completely wiped out.”
  • Another might complain, “I have so many responsibilities, I always feel wiped out.”

33. Spent

When someone feels spent, it means they are completely depleted, both physically and emotionally. This can be due to physical exertion or mental strain.

  • For example, “After a long day of hiking, I feel completely spent.”
  • A person might say, “Dealing with all these problems has left me feeling spent.”
  • Another might express, “I’ve been working overtime for weeks, and I’m totally spent.”

34. Drained

When someone feels drained, it means they are completely depleted, either emotionally or physically. It can refer to feeling overwhelmed or exhausted.

  • For instance, “After dealing with all those difficult customers, I feel emotionally drained.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been running around all day, and now I’m physically drained.”
  • Another might confess, “The constant stress is leaving me feeling drained.”

35. Strung out

This slang term is often used to describe feeling overwhelmed and exhausted, typically due to stress or fatigue.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours and I’m starting to feel strung out.”
  • A person might say, “I have so many deadlines to meet, I’m feeling really strung out.”
  • Another might admit, “The pressure is getting to me, and I’m starting to feel strung out.”

36. Fried

This term is often used to describe feeling mentally overwhelmed or exhausted.

  • For example, “After studying for 12 hours straight, I’m completely fried.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle any more work today, my brain is fried.”
  • Another might express, “This project has me feeling fried, I need a break.”

37. Snowballing

This term describes a situation where something starts small and gradually becomes bigger or more overwhelming.

  • For instance, “I was already overwhelmed, and then the number of tasks just kept snowballing.”
  • A person might say, “The stress just keeps snowballing, I can’t catch a break.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The problems at work are snowballing, it’s getting out of control.”

38. Dizzy

This term is used to describe feeling overwhelmed or disoriented, as if one’s head is spinning.

  • For example, “I have so much to do, it’s making me feel dizzy.”
  • A person might say, “The amount of information is overwhelming, it’s making me dizzy.”
  • Another might express, “I feel dizzy with all the responsibilities on my plate.”

39. Swept off one’s feet

This term is used to describe feeling overwhelmed by strong emotions or surprise, often in a positive sense.

  • For instance, “When he proposed, I was completely swept off my feet.”
  • A person might say, “The surprise party really swept me off my feet.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Her performance was so amazing, it swept me off my feet.”

40. Knocked for six

This term is often used to describe being completely overwhelmed or taken by surprise, similar to being hit by something unexpected.

  • For example, “The sudden news of his passing really knocked me for six.”
  • A person might say, “I wasn’t expecting such a reaction, it really knocked me for six.”
  • Another might express, “The amount of work they gave me today really knocked me for six.”

41. Frazzled

This term is used to describe a state of extreme stress or overwhelm. It implies feeling mentally and physically exhausted and unable to cope with the demands of a situation.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours all week and I’m feeling completely frazzled.”
  • When someone is overwhelmed with responsibilities, they might say, “I’m so frazzled right now, I don’t know how I’m going to get everything done.”
  • A person might describe their mental state as, “I feel frazzled and scattered, like I can’t think straight.”

42. Spinning

When someone is “spinning,” it means they feel mentally overwhelmed or disoriented. It can also refer to a state of confusion or feeling out of control.

  • For instance, “I have so many things going on right now, my head is spinning.”
  • When someone is overwhelmed with tasks, they might say, “My to-do list is spinning out of control.”
  • A person might describe their thoughts as, “I can’t focus on anything, my mind is just spinning.”

43. Melting down

To “melt down” means to lose control or become overwhelmed with emotions. It can refer to a situation where someone is unable to handle stress or overwhelming circumstances.

  • For example, “I was so overwhelmed with work that I had a complete meltdown.”
  • When someone is feeling emotionally overwhelmed, they might say, “I’m on the verge of a meltdown.”
  • A person might describe their state as, “I just can’t handle it anymore, I feel like I’m melting down.”

44. Flustered

When someone is “flustered,” it means they feel agitated or disorganized due to overwhelm. It can also refer to a state of confusion or feeling out of control.

  • For instance, “I was so flustered by the unexpected news that I couldn’t think straight.”
  • When someone is overwhelmed with tasks, they might say, “I’m feeling really flustered right now.”
  • A person might describe their thoughts as, “I’m so flustered, I can’t remember what I was supposed to do next.”

45. Juggling too much

To “juggle too much” means to attempt to handle or manage more than one can handle. It implies having too many responsibilities or tasks to handle effectively.

  • For example, “I’m juggling too much right now, I need to delegate some tasks.”
  • When someone is overwhelmed with responsibilities, they might say, “I feel like I’m juggling too much and everything is falling apart.”
  • A person might describe their workload as, “I’m juggling too much and I can’t seem to find a balance.”

46. Running on empty

This slang phrase refers to feeling completely drained or depleted, often due to excessive work or stress. It implies being overwhelmed to the point of having nothing left to give.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve been working overtime all week, and I’m running on empty.”
  • In a conversation about burnout, someone might share, “I feel like I’m constantly running on empty and never getting a break.”
  • Another person might express their exhaustion by saying, “Between school, work, and personal life, I’m always running on empty.”

47. Swimming in tasks

This phrase describes being overwhelmed with a large number of tasks or responsibilities. It conveys the feeling of being unable to keep up or stay afloat.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have so much work to do, I’m swimming in tasks.”
  • In a discussion about workload, a person might share, “I feel like I’m constantly swimming in tasks and never catching up.”
  • Another person might express their overwhelm by saying, “Between school, work, and family obligations, I’m always swimming in tasks.”

48. Lost in the shuffle

This slang phrase refers to feeling overwhelmed or neglected in a busy or chaotic environment. It suggests being forgotten or left behind amidst the hustle and bustle.

  • For example, a person might say, “I often feel lost in the shuffle at work, with so many projects going on.”
  • In a conversation about being overshadowed, someone might share, “In a big family, it’s easy to get lost in the shuffle and not receive attention.”
  • Another person might express their frustration by saying, “With all the noise and chaos, I feel like my needs are constantly lost in the shuffle.”

49. Overwhelmed to the max

This phrase emphasizes being overwhelmed to the highest degree. It conveys a sense of being completely flooded or swamped with tasks, emotions, or responsibilities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have so much on my plate right now, I’m overwhelmed to the max.”
  • In a discussion about stress, a person might share, “I’m feeling completely inundated with work and personal commitments.”
  • Another person might express their overwhelm by saying, “Between deadlines, social obligations, and personal struggles, I’m overwhelmed to the max.”

50. Drowning in work

This phrase describes being heavily burdened or overwhelmed with work. It compares the feeling to being submerged or suffocated underwater.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have so many deadlines to meet, I’m drowning in work.”
  • In a conversation about workload, someone might share, “I feel like I’m constantly swamped with tasks and never catching a break.”
  • Another person might express their overwhelm by saying, “Between multiple jobs and personal responsibilities, I’m always drowning in work.”

51. Juggling too many tasks

This phrase refers to the feeling of being overwhelmed by having too many tasks or responsibilities to handle simultaneously.

  • For example, “I’m juggling too many tasks right now and I don’t know where to start.”
  • A student might say, “I’m juggling too many tasks between school, work, and extracurricular activities.”
  • A busy professional might express, “I feel like I’m constantly juggling too many tasks and struggling to keep up.”
See also  Top 14 Slang For Handiwork – Meaning & Usage