Top 79 Slang For Pay – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about money, there’s a whole new language out there that goes beyond just dollars and cents. Slang for pay is a fascinating world filled with terms that can help you navigate the financial landscape with ease. Let us guide you through this list of the most common and trendy slang words related to money, so you can stay ahead of the game and sound like a pro in any financial conversation. Get ready to level up your money vocabulary!

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1. Bread

This slang term refers to money, particularly in the form of cash. It is often used to describe a large sum of money or earnings.

  • For example, “I just got paid, now I’ve got some bread in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up some bread for a vacation.”
  • A person discussing a job offer might ask, “How much bread are they offering for the position?”

2. Dough

Similar to “bread,” “dough” is another term used to refer to money. It is often used in the context of earning or making money.

  • For instance, “I’m working two jobs to bring in some dough.”
  • In a discussion about entrepreneurship, someone might say, “Starting your own business can be a great way to earn some dough.”
  • A person talking about a successful investment might exclaim, “I just made a lot of dough from that stock!”

3. Cash

This slang term simply refers to money, particularly in the form of physical currency. It is a straightforward way to describe payment or funds.

  • For example, “I need some cash to pay for this meal.”
  • In a conversation about financial transactions, someone might say, “I prefer to use cash rather than credit cards.”
  • A person discussing their salary might mention, “I earn a decent amount of cash in my job.”

4. Green

The term “green” is often used as a slang word for money, specifically referring to cash. It derives from the color of US currency which is predominantly green.

  • For instance, “I need some green to cover my expenses.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up enough green for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person talking about a generous tip might comment, “They left me a lot of green for excellent service.”

5. Cheddar

This slang term is a playful way to refer to money, particularly a large sum of money. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous context.

  • For example, “I just got a big bonus and now I’m rolling in cheddar!”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might say, “They’re making serious cheddar in their new business.”
  • A person discussing their income might joke, “I wish I had more cheddar in my bank account.”

6. Benjamins

This term refers to one hundred dollar bills, which feature a portrait of Benjamin Franklin. It is often used to describe a large amount of money or wealth.

  • For example, “He made it rain with Benjamins at the club last night.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up some Benjamins for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person boasting about their success might say, “I’m rolling in Benjamins after that big promotion.”

7. Stacks

This slang term refers to a wad or bundle of cash, usually in the form of paper bills. It is often used to describe a large amount of money.

  • For instance, “He always carries stacks of cash in his pockets.”
  • In a discussion about illegal activities, someone might say, “He’s involved in some shady business, always dealing with stacks of money.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I’m stacking stacks, living the high life.”

8. Bills

This term is a common slang term for paper currency, specifically referring to dollar bills. It can also be used to refer to a specific denomination, such as a twenty-dollar bill.

  • For example, “He paid for the meal with a stack of bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to pay my bills before the due date.”
  • A person discussing the cost of something might say, “That concert ticket is going to cost you fifty bills.”

9. Payday

This term refers to the day when an employee receives their wages or salary. It is often used to express excitement or anticipation for receiving money.

  • For instance, “I can’t wait for payday, I need to buy some new clothes.”
  • In a conversation about financial planning, someone might say, “I always set aside a portion of my paycheck on payday.”
  • A person expressing relief might say, “Finally, it’s payday and I can pay off my bills.”

10. Salary

This term refers to the fixed amount of money that an employee receives on a regular basis in exchange for their work. It is often used to describe a person’s income from their job.

  • For example, “She earns a high salary as a software engineer.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I’m looking for a job with a competitive salary.”
  • A person discussing job satisfaction might say, “I love my job, but I wish the salary was higher.”

11. Wages

This term refers to the payment that a person receives for their work, usually on a regular basis. It can be used to describe both hourly and salaried pay.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m happy with my wages at this job.”
  • In a discussion about fair compensation, a person might argue, “Workers deserve higher wages for their hard work.”
  • A financial advisor might advise, “You should save a portion of your wages for retirement.”

12. Loot

This slang term is used to refer to a large amount of money, often acquired through illegal or questionable means.

  • For instance, a character in a movie might say, “I just scored a big pile of loot from that heist.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might comment, “Those CEOs are making insane amounts of loot.”
  • A person might boast, “I’m rolling in the loot after winning the lottery.”

13. Coin

This term is used to refer to money in general, regardless of the form of payment. It can be used to describe physical currency or digital forms of payment.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to hit the ATM and get some coin.”
  • In a conversation about financial independence, a person might say, “I’m working hard to earn enough coin to live comfortably.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any spare coin for coffee?”

14. Scratch

This slang term is used to refer to money, often in the context of earning or making it.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to find a way to earn some scratch.”
  • In a discussion about financial stability, someone might comment, “You need to have a steady source of scratch to survive.”
  • A person might brag, “I’m making mad scratch with my new business venture.”

15. Bank

This term is used to refer to a large amount of money, often in the context of savings or wealth.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m saving up to buy a house and I’ve got a decent amount in the bank.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might say, “I want to have enough in the bank to retire comfortably.”
  • A person might boast, “I just made a huge deposit and now I’ve got mad bank.”

16. Cheese

This slang term refers to money. It is commonly used to describe a large sum of money.

  • For example, “I just made some serious cheese from my latest business venture.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up more cheese before I can afford a vacation.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe how much cheese I had to spend on car repairs.”

17. Cabbage

This slang term also refers to money. It is derived from the phrase “cabbage leaves,” which is a slang term for paper money.

  • For instance, “I need to find a way to earn more cabbage to pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I’ve been saving up a lot of cabbage for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I wish I could just pick some cabbage off a money tree.”

18. Breadwinner

This term refers to the person in a household who earns the majority of the income. It is often used to describe the person responsible for financially supporting their family.

  • For example, “My father was the breadwinner in our family, working long hours to provide for us.”
  • In a conversation about gender roles, someone might say, “Traditionally, the husband was expected to be the breadwinner.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you think the concept of the breadwinner is still relevant in modern society?”

19. Paycheck

This term refers to the amount of money an individual receives from their employer as payment for their work. It is typically received in the form of a check or direct deposit.

  • For instance, “I can’t wait to receive my paycheck so I can pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I allocate a portion of each paycheck towards savings.”
  • A person might complain, “My paycheck is barely enough to cover my living expenses.”

20. Moolah

This slang term is another way of referring to money. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I just won a lot of moolah at the casino.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m saving up moolah for a dream vacation.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I had a magic moolah tree that could solve all my financial problems.”

21. Skrilla

This term is used to refer to money or cash. It is often associated with earning a large amount of money quickly or in a lucrative manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m just trying to make some skrilla to pay the bills.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might mention, “I’m saving up my skrilla to buy a new car.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making skrilla rain with my latest album.”

22. Guap

This slang term is used to describe a large amount of money. It is often used to emphasize wealth or financial success.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always flashing his guap, like he’s the richest person in town.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, a person might comment, “That designer handbag costs serious guap.”
  • A rapper might brag, “I’m stacking guap, making it rain in the club.”

23. Paper

This term is a common slang word for money. It is often used in casual conversations to refer to cash or financial transactions.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to go to the ATM and get some paper.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, a person might ask, “How much paper does that position offer?”
  • A teenager might complain, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m broke and have no paper.”

24. Bread and butter

This phrase is used to describe a person’s primary or main source of income. It refers to the basic sustenance or livelihood that provides for one’s needs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My job as a teacher is my bread and butter.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, a person might mention, “I’m considering a career change because my current job is no longer my bread and butter.”
  • A business owner might say, “My bakery is my bread and butter, it’s what keeps me afloat financially.”

25. Dead presidents

This term is used to refer to paper currency, particularly U.S. dollar bills that feature the faces of deceased presidents. It is often used in the context of handling or discussing money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to hit the ATM and get some dead presidents.”
  • In a conversation about financial transactions, a person might mention, “I’m always carrying around a stack of dead presidents.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making it rain with dead presidents, throwing money everywhere.”

26. Bucks

This term is a slang for dollars, often used to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, “I paid 20 bucks for this shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I make 50 bucks an hour at my job.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might ask, “How much did that meal cost? About 30 bucks?”

27. Greenbacks

This term refers to paper currency, particularly U.S. dollars. It originated from the green color of the ink used on the back of U.S. banknotes.

  • For example, “He paid for the concert tickets with a handful of greenbacks.”
  • A person might say, “I always carry some greenbacks in case of emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might mention, “Greenbacks used to be backed by gold.”

28. Wage

This term refers to the payment received by an employee for work done, often on an hourly or weekly basis.

  • For instance, “She earns a decent wage working at the factory.”
  • A person might say, “I need to negotiate a higher wage for this job.”
  • In a conversation about income, someone might ask, “What’s your average wage per hour?”

29. Stipend

This term refers to a fixed sum of money paid regularly to someone, often as an allowance or to cover specific expenses.

  • For example, “She receives a monthly stipend for her research work.”
  • A person might say, “I use my stipend to cover my living expenses.”
  • In a discussion about funding, someone might mention, “The stipend for this program is quite generous.”

30. Compensation

This term refers to the act of providing payment or something of value to someone in exchange for their services or losses.

  • For instance, “The company offered him compensation for the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I received a fair compensation for my work on that project.”
  • In a conversation about benefits, someone might ask, “What kind of compensation package does this job offer?”

31. Remuneration

Remuneration refers to the act of compensating someone for their work or services. It is a formal term for payment or salary.

  • For example, “The company offers competitive remuneration packages to attract top talent.”
  • In a discussion about fair wages, someone might say, “Workers deserve fair remuneration for their contributions.”
  • An HR manager might discuss, “We need to review the remuneration structure to ensure it aligns with industry standards.”

32. Earnings

Earnings refer to the money that someone receives for their work or investments. It is a general term for the money one makes.

  • For instance, “Her earnings have increased significantly since she started her own business.”
  • A financial advisor might say, “It’s important to budget and save a portion of your earnings.”
  • In a discussion about salary negotiations, someone might ask, “What are your expected earnings for this position?”

33. Honorarium

An honorarium is a small payment or fee given as a token of appreciation for services rendered. It is often used in the context of guest speakers, performers, or volunteers.

  • For example, “The guest speaker received an honorarium for sharing their expertise.”
  • A non-profit organization might offer an honorarium to volunteers who go above and beyond.
  • In a discussion about compensating artists, someone might argue, “An honorarium is not enough to sustain a career in the arts.”

34. Perks

Perks refer to additional benefits or advantages that come with a job or position. They are often non-monetary incentives that enhance the overall compensation package.

  • For instance, “The company offers great perks like flexible working hours and free gym memberships.”
  • A job seeker might ask, “What are the perks of working for this company?”
  • In a discussion about employee satisfaction, someone might say, “Perks can contribute to a positive work environment.”

35. Payola

Payola refers to the practice of paying someone, typically in the music industry, to promote a particular song or artist. It is often used to describe illegal or unethical payments made to influence the success of a music release.

  • For example, “The record label was accused of engaging in payola to get their artist’s song on the radio.”
  • A music journalist might write, “Payola undermines the integrity of the industry and hinders the discovery of new talent.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, someone might say, “Payola is just one example of how money can corrupt the music business.”

36. Fee

A sum of money that is paid in exchange for goods or services. “Fee” is a commonly used term to describe a specific charge for a service or transaction.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “My hourly fee is $200.”
  • When discussing the cost of a concert, someone might ask, “What’s the ticket fee?”
  • A customer might inquire, “Is there an additional fee for shipping?”

37. Dosh

This slang term refers to money or cash. It is commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to earn some dosh to pay the bills.”
  • A person discussing their financial situation might say, “I’m running low on dosh.”
  • When talking about a large amount of money, someone might say, “He’s got loads of dosh.”

38. Pay dirt

This term refers to a successful or profitable outcome, often in relation to financial gains. It is commonly used to describe a situation where someone finds or achieves something valuable.

  • For example, a salesperson might say, “I hit pay dirt with that new client.”
  • A person celebrating a successful investment might exclaim, “I struck pay dirt with that stock!”
  • When discussing a lucky find, someone might say, “I was digging in the attic and hit pay dirt when I found this antique.”

39. Jack

This slang term is used to refer to money or cash. It is a commonly used term in various contexts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to earn some jack to pay the bills.”
  • A person discussing their financial situation might say, “I’m running low on jack.”
  • When talking about a large amount of money, someone might say, “He’s got loads of jack.”

40. Bacon

This term is often used to refer to money or cash. It is a slang term that is commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to earn some bacon to pay the bills.”
  • A person discussing their financial situation might say, “I’m running low on bacon.”
  • When talking about a large amount of money, someone might say, “He’s got stacks of bacon.”

41. Moola

A slang term for money, often used to refer to a large amount of cash. “Moola” is a playful and informal way to talk about money.

  • For example, “I just got my paycheck, time to make some moola!”
  • A person might say, “I need some extra moola to buy that new gadget.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much moola do you have saved up?”

42. Payback

Refers to getting even or seeking revenge on someone who has wronged you. “Payback” implies a desire to retaliate or settle a score.

  • For instance, “He cheated on me, now it’s time for payback.”
  • In a discussion about justice, someone might say, “Everyone deserves payback for their actions.”
  • A character in a movie might declare, “I’m going to get my payback, no matter what.”

43. Bankroll

To have a large sum of money or financial resources available. “Bankroll” suggests having enough money to support or fund something.

  • For example, “He’s always bragging about his bankroll.”
  • In a conversation about starting a business, someone might say, “I need a bankroll to get things off the ground.”
  • A person discussing investments might mention, “Having a solid bankroll allows for greater financial opportunities.”

44. Pay envelope

Refers to the physical envelope containing a person’s wages or salary. “Pay envelope” is a term commonly used to describe the physical act of receiving payment.

  • For instance, “She eagerly opened her pay envelope to see how much she earned.”
  • In a discussion about employment, someone might say, “I can’t wait for payday and my pay envelope.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you remember to pick up your pay envelope from the office?”

45. Payoff

The result or outcome of an investment, effort, or action that brings a positive return. “Payoff” can refer to a financial gain or a beneficial result.

  • For example, “After years of hard work, she finally saw the payoff.”
  • In a conversation about gambling, someone might say, “I’m hoping for a big payoff at the casino.”
  • A person discussing a project might mention, “The payoff will be worth all the time and effort invested.”

46. Take-home

This term refers to the amount of money a person earns after taxes and other deductions have been taken out. It represents the actual amount of money that a person takes home after all expenses have been accounted for.

  • For example, “I make $50,000 a year, but my take-home pay is closer to $40,000.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “Make sure to factor in your take-home pay when calculating your monthly expenses.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Try to save at least 20% of your take-home pay for retirement.”

47. C-note

This slang term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. The term “C-note” comes from the Roman numeral for one hundred, which is “C”.

  • For instance, “I paid him back with a C-note.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might say, “I dropped a couple of C-notes on those shoes.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a C-note?”

This term refers to any form of money that is recognized by a government as a valid form of payment for debts and transactions. It is the currency that is legally accepted within a particular country.

  • For example, “The US dollar is the legal tender in the United States.”
  • In a conversation about payment options, someone might ask, “Is cash the only legal tender for this transaction?”
  • A traveler might inquire, “Can I use US dollars as legal tender in this country?”

49. Filthy lucre

This slang term is used to refer to money that is obtained through dishonest or immoral means. It often carries a negative connotation and implies that the money is tainted or dirty.

  • For instance, “He would do anything for filthy lucre.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, someone might say, “They were motivated by nothing but filthy lucre.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful not to get involved in any schemes for filthy lucre.”

50. Folding stuff

This term is a colloquial way of referring to paper money, particularly cash that can be folded and carried in a wallet or pocket. It emphasizes the physical nature of money as something that can be folded and easily transported.

  • For example, “I need some folding stuff for the parking meter.”
  • In a conversation about payment methods, someone might ask, “Do you prefer folding stuff or digital payments?”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a little folding stuff in case of emergencies.”

51. Green stuff

“Green stuff” is a slang term for money, referring to the color of US dollar bills. It can be used to talk about cash in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some green stuff to pay my bills.”
  • When discussing finances, a person might ask, “How much green stuff do you have saved up?”
  • Another might say, “I’m going to work some overtime to earn some extra green stuff.”

52. Long green

Similar to “green stuff,” “long green” is another slang term for money. It suggests a significant sum of cash.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s got a lot of long green after winning the lottery.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, a person might say, “If you want to be rich, you need to have some long green.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m saving up my long green for a dream vacation.”

53. Ready money

“Ready money” refers to cash that is easily accessible and can be used immediately for transactions.

  • For example, a person might say, “I always keep some ready money in case of emergencies.”
  • When discussing budgeting, someone might say, “I set aside a portion of my paycheck as ready money.”
  • Another might comment, “I prefer using ready money for small purchases instead of using a credit card.”

54. Sugar

In slang terms, “sugar” can refer to money or a generous offer or deal.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need some sugar to buy that new gadget.”
  • In a negotiation, a person might say, “Throw in some extra sugar, and we’ve got a deal.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s always looking for ways to make some quick sugar.”

55. Cash in

When someone “cashes in,” they are exchanging something for money or converting an asset into cash.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to cash in my vacation days for some extra money.”
  • When discussing investments, someone might say, “It’s a good time to cash in on those stocks.”
  • Another might comment, “He decided to cash in his collection of rare coins for a down payment on a house.”

56. C-notes

This term refers to hundred-dollar bills, which feature the letter “C” as part of their serial number. It is a slang term commonly used to refer to large sums of money.

  • For example, “He paid for the car in C-notes.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some C-notes from the bank.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “It’s always a good idea to have a few C-notes stashed away for emergencies.”

57. Pay off

To “pay off” means to have a positive outcome or result from a particular action or effort. It can also refer to the act of repaying a debt or completing a financial transaction.

  • For instance, “All my hard work finally paid off when I got the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping this investment pays off in the long run.”
  • In a discussion about gambling, someone might mention, “Sometimes taking a risk can really pay off.”

58. Pay the piper

This phrase means to accept the negative consequences of one’s actions or decisions. It often implies that someone must pay for their mistakes or bad choices.

  • For example, “If you break the rules, you have to pay the piper.”
  • A person might say, “He thought he could get away with cheating, but eventually he had to pay the piper.”
  • In a discussion about accountability, someone might mention, “It’s important to take responsibility for your actions and be prepared to pay the piper.”

59. Settle up

To “settle up” means to pay off a debt or balance, usually in full. It can also refer to resolving a financial transaction or finalizing an agreement.

  • For instance, “Let’s settle up the bill before we leave the restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “I need to settle up with my roommate for my share of the rent.”
  • In a discussion about business deals, someone might mention, “Once all the terms are agreed upon, we can settle up and sign the contract.”

60. Shell out

To “shell out” means to spend money, often in a significant or substantial amount. It can also imply reluctantly or unwillingly parting with money.

  • For example, “I had to shell out a lot of money to repair my car.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not willing to shell out that much money for a concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “Sometimes you have to shell out for unexpected expenses.”

61. Pony up

When someone is asked to pony up, they are being asked to contribute money or pay for something. It can also mean to provide or give something that is expected or required.

  • For example, “It’s your turn to pony up for the pizza.”
  • In a business transaction, one party might say, “If you want this deal to go through, you’ll need to pony up the funds.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you pony up some cash for the concert tickets?”

62. Fork over

To fork over means to give or pay money, often unwillingly or reluctantly. It implies that the person is handing over a significant amount of money or making a sacrifice.

  • For instance, “He had to fork over a large sum of money to settle the debt.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might say, “If you want this item, you’ll have to fork over some extra cash.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “If you want to go to that concert, you’ll need to fork over some of your own money.”

63. Kick in

To kick in means to contribute or donate money, often as part of a group effort or for a specific cause. It can also mean to start or begin, especially in relation to a task or activity.

  • For example, “Everyone needs to kick in $10 for the gift.”
  • In a fundraising campaign, someone might say, “If everyone kicks in a small amount, we can reach our goal.”
  • A team member might say, “I’ll kick in and help with the project.”

64. Ante up

To ante up means to pay or contribute money, often in a gambling context where players must contribute to the pot before a hand is dealt. It can also mean to provide or give something that is expected or required.

  • For instance, “Everyone needs to ante up before the game starts.”
  • In a business deal, one party might say, “If you want to be part of this venture, you’ll need to ante up.”
  • A friend might say, “If you want to come on the trip, you’ll need to ante up for your share of the expenses.”

65. Pay the bill

To pay the bill means to settle the payment for a bill or expense. It is a straightforward and literal way of referring to the act of paying for something.

  • For example, “After dinner, it’s your turn to pay the bill.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Let’s split the bill evenly so that everyone pays their fair share.”
  • A customer might ask the server, “Can I pay the bill with a credit card?”

66. Cover the tab

To cover the cost of a meal or drinks for a group of people. This phrase is often used when one person pays for everyone’s expenses.

  • For example, “Thanks for covering the tab last night, it was really generous of you.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “I’ll cover the tab this time, you can get it next time.”
  • When discussing a recent outing, a person might ask, “Who covered the tab at the restaurant?”

To pay for something in its entirety, often used when one person pays for everyone or takes on the full financial responsibility.

  • For instance, “I’ll foot the bill for dinner tonight, it’s my treat.”
  • In a business context, a company might say, “We’ll foot the bill for your travel expenses.”
  • When discussing a shared expense, someone might ask, “Are we splitting the bill or is someone footing the whole thing?”

68. Pick up the check

To pay for a bill or expense, often used when one person takes on the responsibility of paying.

  • For example, “I’ll pick up the check, you can get the next one.”
  • In a social setting, someone might offer, “Let me pick up the check this time, you got it last time.”
  • When discussing a restaurant outing, a person might ask, “Who’s picking up the check tonight?”

69. Settle the score

To settle or resolve a financial obligation or debt.

  • For instance, “I finally settled the score with my landlord by paying the remaining rent.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to settle the score with our suppliers before moving forward.”
  • When discussing personal finances, a person might ask, “Have you settled the score with your credit card debt?”

70. Square up

To settle or pay off a debt or bill.

  • For example, “I need to square up with my roommate for my share of the rent.”
  • In a financial context, someone might say, “Let’s square up on the outstanding invoices.”
  • When discussing a shared expense, a person might ask, “Can you square up with me for dinner last night?”

71. Clear the debt

To fully repay or eliminate a debt, often with a sense of relief or accomplishment. This phrase implies that the debt is completely resolved and no longer owed.

  • For example, “After years of struggling, I finally cleared my debt and can start fresh.”
  • A financial advisor might advise, “If you have the means, it’s best to clear your debt as soon as possible to avoid accruing interest.”
  • Someone discussing their financial goals might say, “My main objective this year is to clear all my debts and become debt-free.”

72. Pay the ransom

To give the requested payment or compensation in exchange for the release of a hostage or the resolution of a threatening situation. This phrase is often used in the context of kidnappings or extortion scenarios.

  • For instance, “The family had to pay the ransom to ensure their loved one’s safe return.”
  • In a crime thriller, a character might say, “If you want to see your friend alive again, you better pay the ransom.”
  • A news report might state, “The company decided to pay the ransom to regain control of their hacked systems.”

73. Pay through the nose

To pay an excessive or exorbitant amount for something, often with a sense of frustration or dissatisfaction. This phrase implies that the price paid is much higher than expected or reasonable.

  • For example, “I had to pay through the nose for that concert ticket, but it was worth it.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe they’re charging so much for a cup of coffee. We’re paying through the nose.”
  • A traveler might say, “Tourist traps always make you pay through the nose for souvenirs.”

74. Pay top dollar

To pay the highest possible price for something, often indicating a desire for quality or exclusivity. This phrase suggests that the price paid is the highest among all available options.

  • For instance, “She wanted the best, so she was willing to pay top dollar for the designer handbag.”
  • A luxury car dealer might advertise, “Experience the finest automobiles and be prepared to pay top dollar.”
  • A fashion enthusiast might say, “If you want to wear the latest trends, be ready to pay top dollar for designer clothing.”

75. Pay an arm and a leg

To pay a large or excessive amount of money for something, often with a sense of sacrifice or regret. This phrase is used to emphasize the high cost or expense involved.

  • For example, “I had to pay an arm and a leg for that antique vase, but it’s a priceless addition to my collection.”
  • A person might say, “I love traveling, but flights during peak season can cost an arm and a leg.”
  • A homeowner might comment, “Renovating our kitchen was worth it, even though it cost us an arm and a leg.”

76. Pay a pretty penny

This phrase means to pay a large or expensive amount of money for something.

  • For example, “I had to pay a pretty penny for that designer handbag.”
  • Someone might say, “I paid a pretty penny for those concert tickets, but it was worth it.”
  • Another example could be, “She paid a pretty penny for that luxury car, but she loves it.”

77. Pay the price

This phrase means to suffer or experience negative consequences as a result of one’s actions or decisions.

  • For instance, “If you break the rules, you’ll have to pay the price.”
  • A person might say, “He cheated on his partner and now he’s paying the price.”
  • Another example could be, “If you don’t study for the exam, you’ll pay the price with a low grade.”

78. Pay the penalty

This phrase means to suffer the consequences or punishment for an action or wrongdoing.

  • For example, “If you commit a crime, you’ll have to pay the penalty.”
  • Someone might say, “He was caught cheating on the test and had to pay the penalty.”
  • Another example could be, “If you violate the rules, you’ll pay the penalty of being disqualified.”

79. Pay the cost

This phrase means to be responsible for or cover the expense or cost of something.

  • For instance, “If you want to go on vacation, you’ll have to pay the cost.”
  • A person might say, “She paid the cost of repairing her car after the accident.”
  • Another example could be, “If you damage the property, you’ll have to pay the cost of repairs.”
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