Top 91 Slang For Pee – Meaning & Usage

Urine, the bodily fluid that often goes by many euphemisms and slang terms. Whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply curious about the creative ways people refer to this bodily function, we’ve got you covered. Our team has done the research and compiled a list of the top slang for urine that will leave you amused and possibly even scratching your head. Get ready to dive into this intriguing world of linguistic creativity!

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1. Whiz

Whiz is a slang term used to describe the act of urinating quickly or with great force. It is often used in casual conversations or informal settings.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a whiz.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been holding it in for so long, I really need to whiz.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might joke, “I can’t believe how fast my dog can whiz, it’s like a fire hose!”

2. Stream

Stream refers to the steady flow of urine during urination. It is a common term used to describe the act of peeing in a straightforward and descriptive manner.

  • For instance, “I could hear the sound of the stream hitting the water.”
  • Someone might say, “After drinking so much water, I had a long and powerful stream.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might ask, “Is your urine stream weak or strong?”

3. Golden shower

Golden shower is a slang term that refers to a sexual act involving urination. It is considered a fetish or kink, and involves one person urinating on another person for sexual pleasure.

  • For example, “Some individuals engage in golden showers as a form of erotic play.”
  • In a discussion about sexual preferences, someone might mention, “I’ve heard of people being into golden showers.”
  • It is important to note that engaging in any sexual activity should be consensual and safe.

4. Pee

Pee is a common and widely used term for urination. It is a casual and informal way to describe the act of expelling urine from the body.

  • For instance, “I need to find a restroom, I really have to pee.”
  • Someone might say, “Hold on, I’ll be right back, I need to pee.”
  • In a conversation about bodily functions, a person might ask, “How often do you pee in a day?”

5. Tinkle

Tinkle is a playful and lighthearted term used to describe the sound of urination. It is often associated with the sound made when urine hits the water in a toilet or other receptacle.

  • For example, “I could hear the tinkle of the pee as it hit the water.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t mind me, I’m just going to tinkle.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might joke, “I always feel like a little fairy when I tinkle.”

6. Piss

This is a common slang term for urine. It is often used informally or in a derogatory manner.

  • For example, “I need to go take a piss.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t be such a pisshead.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m busting for a piss!”

7. Back Teeth are Floating

This phrase is used to describe the urgent need to urinate, often when one has been holding it in for a long time.

  • For instance, “I’ve been on this road trip for hours, and my back teeth are floating!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t concentrate on anything else right now, my back teeth are floating.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I need to find a bathroom ASAP, my back teeth are floating!”

8. Drain the Dragon

This phrase is a playful and humorous way to describe the act of urinating.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to drain the dragon.”
  • A person might say, “Excuse me, I just need to go drain the dragon.”
  • Another might ask, “Hey, have you drained the dragon yet?”

9. Flat-Rocking

This term is used to describe the act of urinating while standing up, typically done by men.

  • For instance, “I prefer flat-rocking over sitting on a toilet.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been flat-rocking since I was a kid.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you think women should be able to flat-rock too?”

10. Gnat’s Piss

This phrase is used to describe a weak or feeble stream of urine.

  • For example, “I’ve been drinking so much water that it’s just a gnat’s piss.”
  • A person might say, “I hate when I have a gnat’s piss stream.”
  • Another might comment, “I need to hydrate more, my urine is like a gnat’s piss.”

11. Raining on the bowl

This phrase refers to the act of urinating while sitting on a toilet seat. It emphasizes the sound of urine hitting the water in the toilet bowl.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to go so bad, I was raining on the bowl.”
  • In a humorous conversation about bathroom habits, a person might joke, “I always make it rain on the bowl.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you remember to aim and not make it rain on the bowl?”

12. Release the pressure

This phrase is a euphemism for urinating and implies the act of relieving oneself after holding in urine for a significant amount of time.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been holding it in for hours. It’s time to release the pressure.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might mention, “I couldn’t find a restroom for so long, I thought I was going to explode. Finally, I could release the pressure.”
  • A friend might ask another, “Do you need to find a bathroom? You look like you’re about to release the pressure.”

13. Refresh the body

This phrase alludes to the feeling of freshness and rejuvenation that comes after urinating. It implies that urinating helps the body get rid of waste and toxins.

  • For example, someone might say, “I always feel so refreshed after I’ve relieved myself and refreshed the body.”
  • In a discussion about the benefits of staying hydrated, a person might mention, “Drinking plenty of water helps flush out toxins and refreshes the body.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might say, “After a good workout, it’s important to drink water and refresh the body by eliminating waste.”

14. Relieve yourself

This phrase is a common euphemism for urinating and emphasizes the act of finding relief by emptying the bladder.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to find a restroom to relieve myself.”
  • In a conversation about bathroom etiquette, a person might remind others, “Remember to give people privacy when they need to relieve themselves.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to go to the bathroom and relieve yourself before we leave?”

15. Wee

This is a simple and informal term for urinating. It is often used in casual conversations or when speaking to children.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back. I need to go for a wee.”
  • In a playful conversation, a person might joke, “I’ve had so much to drink, I’ll probably be going for a wee every 5 minutes.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you remember to go for a wee before we left the house?”

16. Number 1

This slang term refers to urinating or the act of using the bathroom. It is often used to describe being the first to use a restroom or to indicate the need to go to the bathroom.

  • For example, a person might say, “Excuse me, I need to go take a number 1.”
  • In a group setting, someone might ask, “Who’s going to be the number 1?”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to go number 1 before we leave?”

17. Yellow rain

This slang term is a euphemism for urine. It is often used to describe the color of urine when it is dark or concentrated.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been drinking a lot of water, so my yellow rain is finally clear.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might ask, “Have you noticed any changes in the color of your yellow rain?”
  • A person jokingly might say, “I better lay off the asparagus, or my yellow rain will be extra stinky.”

18. Leak

This slang term refers to the unintentional release of urine, often due to a lack of control or urgency. It is typically used to describe situations where someone has an accident and urinates outside of a restroom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had a little leak on the way home because I couldn’t find a bathroom.”
  • When discussing potty training, a parent might say, “We’re still working on getting rid of leaks.”
  • A person might share a funny story and say, “I was laughing so hard that I had a little leak.”

19. Wizz

This slang term refers to urinating quickly or with great speed. It is often used to describe the act of relieving oneself in a hurry or without much time to spare.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to wizz before we leave the house.”
  • In a public restroom, a person might ask, “Can you hurry up? I really need to wizz.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Make sure you wizz before we get in the car.”

20. Piddle

This slang term refers to urinating in a casual or relaxed manner. It is often used to describe the act of relieving oneself without much urgency or in a leisurely manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I just need to piddle.”
  • When discussing bathroom breaks at work, a colleague might say, “I like to take a quick piddle to break up the day.”
  • A person might joke, “I’ll just be over here piddling while you finish up.”

21. Splash

This slang term refers to the act of urinating. It is often used to describe the sound or sensation of urine hitting the water or a surface.

  • For example, “I really need to splash before we leave the restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “I heard someone splashing in the bathroom stall next to me.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I find a restroom? I need to splash.”

22. Relief

This term is used to describe the feeling of relief that comes after urinating, especially when someone has been holding it in for a while.

  • For instance, “I finally found a bathroom and experienced immediate relief.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to get home and feel the relief of emptying my bladder.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Ah, the sweet relief of peeing after a long car ride.”

23. Drain the lizard

This phrase is a humorous way of saying “to urinate.” It is often used in a casual or lighthearted context.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to drain the lizard.”
  • A person might say, “After drinking all that water, I feel like I need to drain the lizard.”
  • Another might jokingly ask, “Anyone else need to drain the lizard before we hit the road?”

24. Take a leak

This slang phrase means “to urinate.” It is a casual and commonly used expression.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a leak.”
  • A person might say, “I always have to take a leak as soon as I get out of the movie theater.”
  • Another might comment, “I hate having to take a leak in public restrooms.”

25. Empty the tank

This phrase means to completely empty one’s bladder when urinating. It implies that there is a need to release a large amount of urine.

  • For example, “After holding it in for so long, I finally had a chance to empty the tank.”
  • A person might say, “I drank so much water that I had to empty the tank multiple times.”
  • Another might comment, “When you have to go, it’s best to find a restroom and empty the tank.”

26. Let it flow

This phrase is a casual way of saying to urinate without any restrictions or holding back.

  • For example, after holding it in for a long time, someone might say, “Finally found a bathroom, time to let it flow.”
  • During a road trip, a person might ask, “Can we stop soon? I really need to let it flow.”
  • After a night of drinking, someone might comment, “I woke up this morning and just let it flow for a solid minute.”

27. Release the floodgates

This phrase is a metaphorical way of describing the act of urinating with great force or intensity.

  • For instance, after holding it in for a while, someone might say, “I can’t hold it any longer, time to release the floodgates.”
  • During a long car ride, a person might urgently request, “Please find a rest stop soon, I need to release the floodgates.”
  • After drinking a large amount of water, someone might exclaim, “I feel like I’m about to release the floodgates any moment now.”

28. Go for a tinkle

This phrase is a lighthearted and colloquial way of saying to urinate, often used in a playful or nonchalant context.

  • For example, before leaving a party, someone might say, “I need to go for a quick tinkle before we head out.”
  • During a conversation about bathroom breaks, a person might mention, “I always feel better after going for a tinkle.”
  • After drinking a large beverage, someone might jokingly comment, “I’ll definitely need to go for a tinkle soon.”

29. Drain the main vein

This phrase is a humorous way of describing the act of completely emptying the bladder through urination.

  • For instance, after drinking a large amount of water, someone might say, “I need to find a bathroom and drain the main vein.”
  • During a conversation about bathroom breaks, a person might comment, “I always feel relieved after draining the main vein.”
  • After holding it in for a while, someone might exclaim, “I can’t wait to find a restroom and drain the main vein!”

30. Whiz like a racehorse

This phrase is a simile comparing the act of urinating to the speed and volume at which a racehorse urinates.

  • For example, after drinking a large amount of water, someone might say, “I’ll be back in a minute, I need to whiz like a racehorse.”
  • During a conversation about bathroom habits, a person might mention, “Sometimes I have to whiz like a racehorse after a long car ride.”
  • After holding it in for a while, someone might comment, “I can’t wait to find a restroom and whiz like a racehorse!”

31. Take a whiz

This phrase is often used to describe the act of urinating in a casual or informal manner.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I just need to take a whiz.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you hold it or do you need to take a whiz?”
  • Someone might comment, “I always feel much better after taking a whiz.”

32. Let loose

This phrase is used to describe the act of urinating freely or without inhibition.

  • For instance, “After holding it in for so long, I finally let loose.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t find a bathroom, so I had to let loose behind a tree.”
  • Someone might jokingly comment, “Watch out, I’m about to let loose like a racehorse.”

33. Answer the call of nature

This phrase is a more formal way of referring to the act of urinating.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to answer the call of nature.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t mind me, I just have to answer the call of nature.”
  • Someone might comment, “Nature is calling, time to answer.”

34. Go for a slash

This phrase is commonly used in British slang to refer to the act of urinating.

  • For instance, “I need to find a restroom, I really have to go for a slash.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you mind if I go for a slash before we leave?”
  • Someone might comment, “I always feel relieved after going for a slash.”

35. Go for a wizz

This phrase is a casual way of referring to the act of urinating.

  • For example, “Hold on, I just need to go for a wizz.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll catch up with you, I have to go for a wizz.”
  • Someone might comment, “I always feel better after going for a wizz.”

36. Take a piss

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying to urinate. It is often used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For example, “I need to use the bathroom, I have to take a piss.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Hold on, I’ll be right back. I gotta take a quick piss.”
  • A person might joke, “I drank so much water, I feel like I’m going to explode. I need to take a piss ASAP!”

37. Go for a pee

This phrase is a common way of saying to urinate. It is often used in informal settings or in British English.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to go for a pee.”
  • In a conversation with a friend, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to go for a quick pee.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where the nearest restroom is? I really need to go for a pee.”

38. Go for a wee

This phrase is a British slang term for urinating. It is commonly used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to go for a wee.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Hold on, I really need to go for a wee.”
  • A person might joke, “I drank so much tea, I’ll be going for a wee every five minutes!”

39. Take a leaky

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying to urinate. It is often used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to take a leaky.”
  • In a conversation with a friend, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a quick leaky.”
  • A person might joke, “I’ve been holding it in for so long, I’m about to burst! I need to take a leaky!”

40. Relieve oneself

This phrase is a more formal way of saying to urinate. It is often used in polite or professional settings.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to relieve myself.”
  • In a conversation with a colleague, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to relieve myself.”
  • A person might politely ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I need to relieve myself.”

41. Take a bathroom break

This phrase is commonly used to politely indicate the need to use the bathroom or go urinate. It can be used in various settings, such as at work, school, or social gatherings.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to take a quick bathroom break.”
  • In a classroom, a student might ask the teacher, “Can I please go for a bathroom break?”
  • At a party, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to take a bathroom break.”

42. Go for a bathroom break

Similar to the previous phrase, this slang is used to indicate the need to use the bathroom. It is a casual way of expressing the need to urinate.

  • For instance, during a road trip, someone might say, “Let’s stop at the next rest area so I can go for a bathroom break.”
  • At a sporting event, a fan might say to their friend, “I’ll be right back, going for a bathroom break.”
  • In a restaurant, someone might ask the waiter, “Where can I go for a bathroom break?”

43. Go for a restroom break

Similar to the previous phrases, this slang is used to indicate the need to use the restroom. It can be used in various settings and is a more formal way of expressing the need to urinate.

  • For example, during a business meeting, someone might say, “May I go for a restroom break?”
  • In a shopping mall, someone might ask a store employee, “Where can I go for a restroom break?”
  • At a concert, a concertgoer might say to their friend, “I’ll be right back, just need to go for a restroom break.”

44. Take a restroom break

Similar to the previous phrases, this slang is used to politely indicate the need to use the restroom or go urinate. It is a more formal way of expressing the need to urinate.

  • For instance, during a business lunch, someone might say, “I apologize, I need to take a restroom break.”
  • In a movie theater, someone might say to their companion, “I’ll be right back, just need to take a restroom break.”
  • At a wedding reception, a guest might ask the venue staff, “Where can I take a restroom break?”

45. Go for a potty break

This phrase is a more informal and playful way of expressing the need to use the bathroom or go urinate. It is often used in a lighthearted or childlike manner.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Do you need to go for a potty break before we leave?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might jokingly say, “I’ll be right back, going for a potty break.”
  • During a road trip, a group of friends might suggest, “Let’s stop at the next rest area for a quick potty break.”

46. Take a potty break

This phrase is a euphemism for taking a break to use the toilet. It is often used in informal or playful settings.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Do you need to take a potty break before we leave?”
  • In a casual conversation among friends, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to take a quick potty break.”
  • In a work environment, a coworker might ask, “Can I take a potty break before our meeting starts?”

47. Go for a toilet break

This phrase is a straightforward way to express the need to take a break in order to use the toilet.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to their students, “You can go for a toilet break during recess.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might ask, “Is it okay if I go for a quick toilet break before we continue the meeting?”
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just going for a quick toilet break.”

48. Take a toilet break

This phrase is a direct way to indicate the need to take a break in order to use the toilet.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Take a toilet break before we start the next drill.”
  • In a public place, someone might ask a staff member, “Where can I take a toilet break around here?”
  • In a conversation among friends, someone might say, “I’ll be back in a minute, just need to take a quick toilet break.”

49. Yellow River

This phrase uses a metaphor comparing urine to a river, emphasizing its color.

  • For instance, a friend might joke, “Don’t fall into the Yellow River!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I need to find a restroom, the Yellow River is flowing.”
  • In a humorous context, a comedian might say, “After drinking so much water, I had to release the Yellow River.”

50. Liquid Gold

This phrase uses the term “gold” to describe urine, possibly alluding to its value or importance.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to find a bathroom, my liquid gold is ready to be released.”
  • In a playful conversation, a friend might ask, “Have you donated your liquid gold today?”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might refer to urine as “liquid gold” when discussing its diagnostic value.
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51. Nature’s call

This phrase refers to the natural urge or need to urinate. It is often used to politely excuse oneself to use the restroom.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Excuse me, I need to answer nature’s call,” it means they need to use the bathroom.
  • In a social setting, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, nature’s calling.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to answer nature’s call before we leave?”

52. Micturition

This term is a formal medical word for the act of urinating. It is often used in medical or scientific contexts.

  • For example, a doctor might discuss a patient’s micturition habits during a check-up.
  • In a research study, a scientist might analyze micturition patterns in different age groups.
  • A medical textbook might explain the process of micturition in detail.

53. Flow

This slang term refers to the act of urinating. It emphasizes the continuous stream or “flow” of urine.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to find a restroom, I can feel the flow coming.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Where’s the nearest restroom? I really need to let the flow go.”
  • A friend might joke, “I drank so much water, I’ll be in the bathroom all night, just letting the flow.”

54. Sprinkle

This term is a colloquial way of referring to urination. It suggests a lighter or less forceful flow of urine.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just need to go for a quick sprinkle, be right back.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might say, “I can’t believe I sprinkled on my shoe, I need to aim better.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you sprinkle before we left the house?”

55. Wetting the whistle

This phrase is a euphemism for urinating. It humorously suggests that the act of urinating is like wetting a whistle to make it work properly.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Excuse me, I need to wet the whistle,” it means they need to use the restroom.
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, just wetting the whistle.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Did you wet the whistle before we left? We have a long drive ahead.”

56. Spending a penny

This phrase originated in the UK and refers to the act of urinating. It is often used humorously or euphemistically.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to go spend a penny.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to spend a penny.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know where I can spend a penny around here?”

57. Taking a leak

This phrase is a common slang term for the act of urinating. It is often used informally and can be considered crude or vulgar.

  • For instance, “Hold on, I need to take a leak.”
  • In a more formal setting, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to use the restroom.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I go to take a leak?”

58. Going for a slash

This phrase is a slang term used primarily in the UK to refer to the act of urinating. It is often used informally and can be considered vulgar.

  • For example, “I’ll be back in a minute, just need to go for a slash.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I really need to go for a slash, can you hold on?”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I need to go for a slash.”

59. Draining the lizard

This phrase is a humorous and somewhat crude slang term for the act of urinating. It is often used in a lighthearted or joking manner.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to go drain the lizard.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to drain the lizard.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where I can find a restroom? I really need to drain the lizard.”

60. Emptying the tank

This phrase is a slang term used to describe the act of urinating, often in a more casual or humorous context.

  • For example, “Hold on, I just need to empty the tank.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be back in a minute, just need to empty the tank.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I really need to empty the tank.”

61. Breaking the seal

This slang phrase is often used to describe the moment when someone finally goes to the bathroom after holding in their urine for a while. It is believed that once you “break the seal,” you will have to go to the bathroom more frequently.

  • For example, “I was at the party for hours before I finally broke the seal and had to keep going to the bathroom.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Once you break the seal, there’s no going back!”
  • A person might joke, “I always regret breaking the seal because then I can’t stop peeing!”

62. Letting it fly

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of urinating without any hesitation or inhibition. It implies a sense of relief and freedom.

  • For instance, “After holding it in for so long, I finally found a secluded spot and let it fly.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I couldn’t find a bathroom, so I just let it fly behind a tree.”
  • A person might comment, “There’s nothing like the feeling of letting it fly after a long car ride.”

63. Hitting the head

This slang phrase is commonly used to refer to the act of going to the bathroom specifically to urinate. “Hitting the head” is a euphemism for using the toilet.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to hit the head before we continue our road trip.”
  • In a military context, someone might say, “After a long march, the soldiers were relieved to hit the head.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you mind if I hit the head before we start the meeting?”

64. Making water

This slang phrase is a euphemism for the act of urinating. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “Sorry, I’ll be right back. I need to make some water.”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might say, “I drank so much water today, I’ve been making water every hour!”
  • A person might comment, “I always feel so much better after making water.”

65. Passing water

This slang phrase is another euphemism for the act of urinating. It implies a sense of fluidity and ease in the process.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to pass some water.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I drank so much coffee this morning, I’ve been passing water all day.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t believe how often I have to pass water when I’m pregnant.”

66. Shaking hands with the governor

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom. It implies a polite and formal way of referring to the act of urinating.

  • For example, if someone says, “Excuse me, I need to go shake hands with the governor,” they are indicating their need to use the restroom.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to shake hands with the governor.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I really need to shake hands with the governor.”

67. Visiting the little boys’/girls’ room

This phrase is a playful way of referring to the act of urinating. It is commonly used to describe someone’s need to use the bathroom.

  • For instance, a parent might ask their child, “Do you need to visit the little boys’ or girls’ room before we leave?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Excuse me, I’ll be right back. Just need to visit the little boys’ or girls’ room.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel more comfortable when I can find the little boys’ or girls’ room in a new place.”

68. Seeing a man about a dog

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom. It suggests that the person needs to attend to another matter, but the context implies that it refers to urinating.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’ll be right back, just need to see a man about a dog,” they are indicating their need to use the restroom.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Hold on a sec, I need to go see a man about a dog.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I really need to see a man about a dog.”

69. Answering nature’s call

This phrase is a polite and formal way of referring to the act of urinating. It suggests a natural bodily function that needs to be attended to.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I apologize, but I need to answer nature’s call,” they are indicating their need to use the restroom.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Just need to answer nature’s call, be right back.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I really need to answer nature’s call.”

70. Taking a whizz

This phrase is a colloquial and informal way of referring to the act of urinating. It implies a quick and efficient action.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’ll be right back, just need to take a whizz,” they are indicating their need to use the restroom.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to take a quick whizz.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a restroom nearby? I really need to take a whizz.”

71. Going to see a man about a horse

This phrase is a euphemism for going to the bathroom or urinating. It is often used humorously or in a lighthearted manner.

  • For example, if someone asks where you’re going, you might reply, “Just going to see a man about a horse.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to see a man about a horse.”
  • A friend might joke, “You’ve been drinking a lot of water, are you going to see a man about a horse again?”

72. Paying the water bill

This phrase is a humorous way to refer to the act of urinating. It suggests that the person is “paying” for the water they have consumed.

  • For instance, if someone asks why you’re heading to the bathroom, you might respond, “Just paying the water bill.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “Excuse me, I need to go pay the water bill.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “Looks like you’ve been drinking a lot, time to pay the water bill!”

73. Siphoning the python

This phrase is a playful and humorous way to describe the act of urinating. It compares the flow of urine to the action of siphoning liquid from one container to another.

  • For example, if someone asks what you’re doing, you might reply, “Just siphoning the python.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to siphon the python.”
  • A friend might joke, “You’ve been holding it in for a while, time to siphon the python!”

74. Draining the main vein

This phrase is a slang term for urinating. It humorously compares the act of urinating to draining a large pipe or vein.

  • For instance, if someone asks where you’re going, you might reply, “Just draining the main vein.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “Excuse me, I need to go drain the main vein.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “Looks like you’ve been holding it in, time to drain the main vein!”

75. Releasing the hounds

This phrase is a humorous way to refer to the act of urinating. It suggests that the person is “releasing” their bodily fluids, similar to how hounds are released to chase after something.

  • For example, if someone asks why you’re heading to the bathroom, you might respond, “Just releasing the hounds.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to release the hounds.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “Looks like you’ve been holding it in, time to release the hounds!”

76. Watering the flowers

This phrase is a euphemism for urinating. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, a parent might tell their child, “Go water the flowers before we leave.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I’ll be right back, just need to water the flowers.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Where’s the nearest restroom? I need to water the flowers.”

77. Letting the yellow river flow

This phrase is a humorous way to refer to urinating, emphasizing the color of urine.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Excuse me, I need to let the yellow river flow.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Have you seen the bathroom? I really need to let the yellow river flow.”
  • Jokingly, a friend might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to release the yellow river.”

78. Going to the john

This phrase is a slang term for urinating, specifically referring to using the toilet.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just going to the john.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Where’s the nearest john? I really need to go.”
  • Jokingly, a friend might say, “Hold on, I’ll be back. Just need to take a trip to the john.”

79. Visiting the porcelain god

This phrase is a humorous way to refer to urinating, using the term “porcelain god” to humorously elevate the act.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to excuse myself and visit the porcelain god.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know where the nearest restroom is? I need to visit the porcelain god.”
  • Jokingly, a friend might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to pay my respects to the porcelain god.”

80. Going to the loo

This phrase is a British slang term for urinating, specifically referring to using the toilet.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just going to the loo.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Where’s the nearest loo? I really need to go.”
  • Jokingly, a friend might say, “Hold on, I’ll be back. Just need to take a trip to the loo.”

81. Using the facilities

This phrase is a polite way to refer to the act of going to the restroom or bathroom. It is often used in formal or professional settings.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “Excuse me, I need to use the facilities.”
  • In a public place, a sign might read, “Please be considerate and clean when using the facilities.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to use the facilities before we leave?”

82. Going to the restroom

This phrase is commonly used to indicate the act of going to the restroom or bathroom to use the toilet.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to go to the restroom.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Where can I find the restroom around here?”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s take a quick break and go to the restroom before we continue.”

83. Going to the bathroom

This phrase is a common way to express the need to use the restroom or toilet.

  • For example, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to go to the bathroom.”
  • In a public place, a sign might indicate the location of the bathrooms with the words “Men” and “Women.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to go to the bathroom before we leave?”

84. Going to the washroom

This phrase is often used in Canada and some other English-speaking countries to refer to the act of going to the restroom or bathroom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to go to the washroom.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Where’s the nearest washroom?”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s find a café with a washroom before we continue walking.”

85. Having a Slash

This phrase is a slang term commonly used in British English to describe the act of urinating.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to have a slash.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Where can I go for a quick slash?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Hold on, I need to find a bush for a slash.”

86. Number One

This term refers to the act of urinating. It is commonly used to refer to the first and most common bodily function of eliminating waste fluids.

  • For example, “I need to go take a number one.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you go number one before we leave?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, just going to do a quick number one.”

87. Piss Off

While this term is not directly related to urine, it is a slang phrase that means to annoy or irritate someone. It is often used in a more aggressive or vulgar manner.

  • For instance, “Don’t piss me off or there will be consequences.”
  • A person might say, “He really knows how to piss off his coworkers.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might shout, “Just piss off!”

88. Pot to Piss In

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking in wealth. It originated from a time when chamber pots were commonly used for urination, and not having a pot to piss in was a sign of extreme poverty.

  • For example, “He’s so broke, he doesn’t even have a pot to piss in.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I used to live in a tiny apartment without a pot to piss in.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might mention, “During the Great Depression, many families didn’t have a pot to piss in.”

89. Spend a Penny

This British slang phrase means to go to the restroom or urinate. It originated from the practice of having to pay a penny to use public restrooms in the past.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to spend a penny.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be right back, just need to spend a penny.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might ask, “Do you know where I can spend a penny around here?”

90. Split the Whiskers

This phrase means to urinate, specifically for men. It refers to the act of aiming and splitting the stream of urine, similar to splitting the whiskers of a beard.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, just need to split the whiskers.”
  • A person might say, “I hate it when I can’t split the whiskers and end up making a mess.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you prefer sitting or splitting the whiskers?”

91. Wee Wee

This is a playful and childlike term for urine, often used by young children or when speaking to young children.

  • For example, a parent might ask their child, “Do you need to go wee wee before we leave?”
  • In a humorous context, someone might say, “I drank so much water, I need to go wee wee every five minutes!”
  • A babysitter might ask a toddler, “Did you have a wee wee in your diaper?”