Top 43 Slang For Peer – Meaning & Usage

Navigating the ever-evolving world of slang can be a daunting task, especially when it comes to staying up-to-date with the latest terms used by your peers. Luckily, we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of modern language to bring you a curated list of the most trendy and relevant slang for peer. Get ready to level up your communication game and impress your friends with this insightful compilation.

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1. Buddy

This term is used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is often used in an affectionate or informal manner.

  • For example, “Hey buddy, how’s it going?”
  • A person might say, “I’m meeting up with my buddies for a drink after work.”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, someone might say, “I remember playing with my buddies in the park every day.”

2. Pal

Similar to “buddy,” this term is also used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is often used in a casual or friendly context.

  • For instance, “Thanks for helping me out, pal.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “Hey pal, long time no see!”
  • In a conversation about going out, someone might ask, “Wanna grab dinner, pal?”

3. Mate

This term is commonly used in British English to refer to a friend or companion. It can also be used in other English-speaking countries, though less frequently.

  • For example, “Cheers, mate!”
  • Two friends might address each other by saying, “Hey mate, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “I’m going camping with a few mates.”

4. Chum

This term is often used to refer to a close friend or companion. It has a slightly old-fashioned or nostalgic feel to it.

  • For instance, “I’ve known him since we were chums in elementary school.”
  • Two friends might say, “Let’s go grab a drink, chum.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “A true chum is always there for you.”

5. Comrade

This term has a more formal or political connotation and is often used to refer to a fellow member of a group or organization. It can also be used in a more general sense to mean “friend” or “ally.”

  • For example, “Comrades, we must stand together in this fight.”
  • Two friends who share a common interest might say, “We’re comrades in our love for music.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “We need to work together, comrades, to achieve our goals.”

6. Amigo

This is a Spanish word for “friend” or “buddy.” It is often used in English to refer to a close friend or companion.

  • For example, “Hey amigo, let’s grab some drinks tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve known him since we were kids. He’s my amigo.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re all amigos here, we’ve got each other’s backs.”

7. Homie

This slang term is derived from the word “homeboy” or “homegirl” and is used to refer to a close friend or someone from the same neighborhood or background.

  • For instance, “What’s up, homie? Long time no see.”
  • A person might say, “He’s not just a co-worker, he’s my homie.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “Homies always have each other’s backs.”

8. Crony

This term is often used to refer to a close associate or friend, especially someone who is involved in dishonest or corrupt activities.

  • For example, “He’s been his business crony for years.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust him, he’s just a crony of the boss.”
  • In a discussion about political corruption, someone might say, “The cronies of the politician are benefiting from his actions.”

9. Sidekick

A sidekick is a term used to describe a close companion or partner who accompanies someone in their adventures or activities.

  • For instance, “Batman and Robin are iconic crime-fighting sidekicks.”
  • A person might say, “She’s my sidekick, we do everything together.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “Every superhero needs a loyal sidekick.”

10. BFF

This acronym stands for “Best Friend Forever” and is used to refer to a person’s closest and most trusted friend.

  • For example, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my BFF.”
  • A person might say, “We’ve been best friends since kindergarten, she’s my BFF.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “A true BFF is someone who will always be there for you.”

11. Playmate

This term refers to a close friend or companion, often used in a playful or affectionate manner. It can also refer to someone who engages in play or recreational activities together.

  • For example, “I’m meeting up with my playmate for a game of basketball.”
  • A person might say, “We’ve been playmates since childhood.”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, someone might mention, “I used to have a playmate who lived next door.”

12. Acquaintance

An acquaintance is someone you know, but not as well as a friend. It refers to a person you have some familiarity with, but with whom you do not share a close relationship.

  • For instance, “I have many acquaintances from my old job.”
  • In a conversation about social circles, someone might say, “We have some mutual acquaintances.”
  • A person might mention, “I bumped into an old acquaintance at the supermarket.”

13. Colleague

A colleague is someone you work with or have a professional relationship with. It refers to a person who shares a similar profession, occupation, or workplace.

  • For example, “I’m having lunch with my colleagues from the office.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “It’s important to communicate effectively with your colleagues.”
  • A person might mention, “I have a great relationship with my colleagues at the hospital.”

14. Confrere

This term refers to a fellow professional or colleague, often used in a formal or professional setting. It signifies someone who shares a similar field of work or expertise.

  • For instance, “I attended a conference with my confreres from the legal industry.”
  • In a conversation about academia, someone might say, “I presented my research findings to my confreres.”
  • A person might mention, “It’s always great to connect with confreres at industry events.”

15. Homeboy

This term refers to a close friend from the same neighborhood or community. It signifies a strong bond and shared experiences rooted in a common background.

  • For example, “I grew up with my homeboys in the same block.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty, someone might say, “My homeboys always have my back.”
  • A person might mention, “I’m going to a party with my homeboys tonight.”

16. Bosom buddy

A bosom buddy is a term used to describe a very close friend or companion. It suggests a deep bond and intimacy between individuals.

  • For example, two friends might say to each other, “You’re my bosom buddy, always there for me.”
  • In a conversation about lifelong friendships, someone might mention, “I’ve known my bosom buddy since we were kids.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “This is my bosom buddy, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

17. Familiar

The term “familiar” is used to refer to someone who is a close acquaintance or friend. It implies a level of comfort and familiarity in the relationship.

  • For instance, someone might say, “We’re not best friends, but we’re definitely familiar with each other.”
  • In a discussion about social circles, a person might say, “I have a few familiar faces in my group of friends.”
  • A person might describe their relationship with a coworker by saying, “We’re more than just colleagues, we’re familiar with each other’s personal lives.”

18. Associate

An associate is a term used to describe a colleague or acquaintance. It suggests a professional or casual relationship with someone.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s not a close friend, just an associate from work.”
  • In a conversation about networking, a person might mention, “I have many professional associates in my industry.”
  • A person might introduce someone by saying, “This is my associate, we collaborate on projects together.”

19. Pard

Pard is a slang term used to refer to a pal or buddy. It conveys a sense of camaraderie and friendship.

  • For instance, two friends might greet each other by saying, “Hey pard, long time no see!”
  • In a discussion about loyal friends, someone might say, “He’s been my pard since we were in elementary school.”
  • A person might describe their weekend plans by saying, “I’m going fishing with my pard, it’s our favorite hobby.”

20. Schoolmate

A schoolmate is a term used to describe a fellow student. It indicates a shared educational experience and implies a level of familiarity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I bumped into my schoolmate at the grocery store yesterday.”
  • In a conversation about high school memories, a person might mention, “I had many schoolmates who became lifelong friends.”
  • A person might introduce someone by saying, “This is my schoolmate, we were in the same class for four years.”

21. Roomie

This term is used to refer to a person with whom one shares a living space, typically in a rented apartment or dormitory. “Roomie” is a casual and friendly way to refer to a roommate.

  • For example, “I’m going to grab dinner with my roomie tonight.”
  • In a conversation about living arrangements, one might say, “I’ve been lucky to have great roomies throughout college.”
  • A person might ask, “Does anyone have any tips for dealing with a messy roomie?”

22. Sis

This term is used to refer to a female friend or peer, often in a supportive or affectionate way. “Sis” is a term commonly used among close friends or within a specific community.

  • For instance, “Hey sis, how’s your day going?”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My best friend is more like a sister to me.”
  • A person might comment, “Sis, you always know how to make me laugh!”

23. Bro

This term is used to refer to a male friend or peer, often in a casual or familiar way. “Bro” is a term commonly used among close friends or within a specific community.

  • For example, “What’s up, bro?”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My bro has always had my back.”
  • A person might comment, “I can always count on my bro for a good time.”

24. Sista

This term is a variation of “sis” and is used to refer to a female friend or peer, often in a supportive or affectionate way. “Sista” is a term commonly used among close friends or within a specific community.

  • For instance, “Hey sista, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My sista is always there for me.”
  • A person might comment, “Sista, you’re the best!”

25. Bestie

This term is used to refer to a person’s closest and most trusted friend. “Bestie” is a term that conveys a deep and special bond between friends.

  • For example, “I’m going on a road trip with my bestie.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My bestie knows me better than anyone.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m so grateful to have my bestie by my side.”

26. Cronie

Cronie is a term used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is often used in a casual or familiar context.

  • For example, you might say, “I’m meeting up with my cronie for lunch.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might mention, “I’ve known my cronie since we were kids.”
  • A person might introduce their cronie to someone else by saying, “This is my cronie, we’ve been through everything together.”

27. Main squeeze

Main squeeze is a slang term used to refer to a person’s significant other or romantic partner. It is often used in an affectionate or endearing way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going out with my main squeeze tonight.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might ask, “How long have you been with your main squeeze?”
  • A person might introduce their main squeeze to others by saying, “This is my main squeeze, we’ve been together for years.”

28. Homie G

Homie G is a slang term used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often used in urban or hip-hop culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “What’s up, homie G?” as a greeting to a friend.
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “He’s my homie G, we’ve been tight for years.”
  • A person might refer to their group of friends as “my homie Gs.”
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29. Road dog

Road dog is a term used to refer to a trusted companion or friend who accompanies someone on their travels or adventures. It implies loyalty and camaraderie.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s my road dog, we’ve traveled together for years.”
  • In a conversation about companionship, someone might mention, “Having a road dog makes the journey more enjoyable.”
  • A person might describe their road dog as “always having their back.”

30. Wingwoman

Wingwoman is a term used to refer to a female friend who assists or supports someone in social situations, particularly in helping them meet potential romantic partners. It is often used in a dating or nightlife context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need a wingwoman to help me break the ice at the party.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might mention, “Having a wingwoman can boost your confidence.”
  • A person might introduce their wingwoman to others by saying, “This is my wingwoman, she’s great at starting conversations.”

31. Bae

This term is used to refer to a romantic partner or someone who is extremely important to you. It’s an affectionate term that emphasizes the importance of the person in your life.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out to dinner with my bae tonight.”
  • When posting a picture with their significant other, someone might caption it, “Date night with my bae!”
  • A person might text their partner, “I miss you, bae. Can’t wait to see you.”

32. Ride or die

This phrase is used to describe someone who is always there for you, no matter what. It refers to a person who is willing to go through anything with you, whether it’s good times or bad times.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She’s my ride or die. We’ve been through everything together.”
  • When talking about a close friend, someone might say, “He’s always been my ride or die. I know I can count on him.”
  • A person might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “Ride or die since day one.”

33. Fam

This term is used to refer to a group of people who are like family or very close friends. It’s a way to show camaraderie and affection for the people you consider to be part of your inner circle.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my fam tonight.”
  • When posting a group picture with friends, someone might caption it, “My fam always knows how to have a good time.”
  • A person might text their friend, “Love you, fam. Thanks for always being there for me.”

34. Partner in crime

This phrase is used to describe someone who is your trusted companion for engaging in mischievous or adventurous activities. It implies a close bond and a shared sense of fun and excitement.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s my partner in crime. We always find a way to have fun together.”
  • When talking about a friend who loves to pull pranks, someone might say, “She’s always up for anything. Definitely my partner in crime.”
  • A person might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “My partner in crime. We’re always up to no good.”

35. Broseph

This term is a combination of “bro” and “Joseph” and is used to refer to a close male friend. It’s a more playful and affectionate way of addressing a friend and implies a strong bond between the two.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey, broseph! What’s up?”
  • When talking about a friend who has been there through thick and thin, someone might say, “He’s not just a friend, he’s my broseph.”
  • A person might text their friend, “Want to grab lunch, broseph? I haven’t seen you in ages.”

36. Sisqo

Sisqo is a term used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often used in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hey Sisqo, wanna grab some lunch?”
  • A person might say, “I’m meeting up with my Sisqo later to hang out.”
  • Another might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my Sisqo, we’ve known each other since high school.”

37. Ride or die chick

A “ride or die chick” is a term used to describe a friend who is extremely loyal and will stick by your side no matter what. It emphasizes the strong bond and commitment between friends.

  • For instance, “I know I can always count on my ride or die chick to have my back.”
  • A person might say, “She’s not just a friend, she’s my ride or die chick.”
  • Another might express their gratitude by saying, “I’m so lucky to have a ride or die chick like her in my life.”

38. Homedog

Homedog is a slang term used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone you are close with.

  • For example, “What’s up, homedog? Wanna hang out tonight?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve known my homedog since we were kids.”
  • Another might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my homedog, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

39. BFFL

BFFL is an acronym that stands for “Best Friend For Life.” It is used to describe a friend who is incredibly close and will be there for you through thick and thin.

  • For instance, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my BFFL.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve known my BFFL since we were in diapers.”
  • Another might express their appreciation by saying, “I’m so grateful to have a BFFL like her in my life.”

40. BFFAE

BFFAE is an acronym that stands for “Best Friends Forever And Ever.” It is similar to BFFL and is used to describe a friend who is incredibly close and will always be there for you.

  • For example, “We’ve been BFFAE since kindergarten.”
  • A person might say, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my BFFAE.”
  • Another might express their love and loyalty by saying, “I’m so lucky to have a BFFAE like her in my life.”

41. Compatriot

This term refers to someone who is from the same country or shares the same nationality as the speaker. It is often used to express a sense of unity or camaraderie among people from the same country.

  • For example, during a sports event, a fan might say, “I’m proud to cheer for our team alongside my compatriots.”
  • In a discussion about national identity, someone might say, “We should unite as compatriots and work towards a common goal.”
  • A politician might address the crowd by saying, “Fellow compatriots, let us come together and build a better future for our country.”

42. Compeer

This term is used to refer to someone who is considered an equal or peer in terms of status, abilities, or accomplishments. It conveys a sense of mutual respect and recognition of each other’s capabilities.

  • For instance, in a professional setting, a colleague might say, “I consider you my compeer in this field.”
  • In a competitive context, someone might say, “I see you as my compeer in this game. Let’s give it our best.”
  • A mentor might tell their mentee, “With hard work and dedication, you can become a compeer in this industry.”

43. Companero

This term, derived from Spanish, is used to refer to a friend or companion. It signifies a close relationship and camaraderie between individuals.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going hiking with my companeros this weekend.”
  • In a group of friends, one person might say, “You guys are my true companeros.”
  • When introducing a close friend to others, someone might say, “This is my companero, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”