Top 50 Slang For Period – Meaning & Usage

Periods, a natural and normal part of a woman’s life, are often surrounded by a cloud of silence and stigma. But fear not, because we’re here to break the silence and shed light on the top slang terms for periods. From Aunt Flo to Shark Week, we’ve got you covered with a list that will not only make you laugh but also empower you to embrace and discuss this important topic. Get ready to have a bloody good time as we dive into the world of period slang!

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1. Aunt Flo

This term is a personification of a woman’s menstrual cycle, often used to refer to the arrival of a period. It is a lighthearted and playful way to talk about menstruation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Aunt Flo is visiting this week, so I need to stock up on supplies.”
  • In a discussion about periods, a person might ask, “How do you deal with Aunt Flo’s monthly visit?”
  • Another person might complain, “I always get terrible cramps when Aunt Flo comes to town.”

2. Shark Week

This slang term humorously compares a woman’s period to the unpredictable and sometimes dangerous nature of shark attacks. It is a playful way to refer to menstruation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “It’s Shark Week for me, so I’m not going swimming.”
  • In a conversation about periods, a person might ask, “When is your next Shark Week?”
  • Another person might joke, “I feel like I’m being hunted by sharks during Shark Week.”

3. Code Red

This term refers to a woman’s period and is often used humorously to convey urgency or a need for immediate attention. It is a playful way to talk about menstruation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Code Red! I need chocolate and painkillers.”
  • In a discussion about periods, a person might ask, “Have you ever had a Code Red situation at work?”
  • Another person might complain, “I always get terrible cramps during Code Red.”

4. Crimson Wave

This slang term refers to a woman’s period, comparing it to the visual image of a wave of red water. It is a playful and poetic way to talk about menstruation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m riding the Crimson Wave this week, so I’m not feeling my best.”
  • In a conversation about periods, a person might ask, “Do you find the Crimson Wave affects your mood?”
  • Another person might joke, “I’m ready to surf the Crimson Wave, but my surfboard is out of commission.”

5. Time of the Month

This term refers to the monthly occurrence of a woman’s period. It is a straightforward and commonly used way to talk about menstruation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t go swimming this weekend because it’s my time of the month.”
  • In a discussion about periods, a person might ask, “How do you manage your schedule during your time of the month?”
  • Another person might complain, “I always feel tired and bloated during my time of the month.”

6. Monthly Visitor

This term refers to a woman’s menstrual cycle, which typically occurs once a month. “Monthly visitor” is a euphemism used to describe the arrival of a woman’s period.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t go swimming today, my monthly visitor just arrived.”
  • In a conversation about reproductive health, someone might ask, “How long does your monthly visitor usually last?”
  • Another person might sympathize with a friend by saying, “I know how uncomfortable the monthly visitor can be.”

7. Auntie Flow

This playful term is a euphemism for a woman’s period. It combines the word “auntie” with a pun on the term “flow,” referring to the flow of menstrual blood.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Auntie Flow is visiting this week, so I’m not feeling my best.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about periods, someone might joke, “Auntie Flow is in town, and she’s not the best houseguest.”
  • Another person might ask, “Does Auntie Flow come to visit you regularly?”

8. Lady Business

This term is a euphemism used to refer to a woman’s period. It humorously emphasizes that menstruation is a natural part of a woman’s bodily functions.

  • For example, a person might say, “Sorry, I can’t go to the gym today, I’m dealing with some lady business.”
  • In a casual conversation about periods, someone might say, “I hate dealing with lady business every month.”
  • Another person might ask, “How do you manage your lady business when you’re traveling?”

9. On the Rag

This slang term is used to refer to a woman who is currently menstruating. It is a somewhat derogatory term that originated from the idea of using rags or cloth as sanitary protection.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She’s on the rag, so she’s not in the best mood.”
  • In a conversation about periods, someone might ask, “Do you experience any discomfort when you’re on the rag?”
  • Another person might comment, “I hate it when I’m on the rag and have to deal with cramps.”

10. Surfing the Crimson Tide

This humorous phrase is a euphemism for a woman’s period. It playfully compares the flow of menstrual blood to the waves of a crimson tide.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t go to the beach today, I’m surfing the crimson tide.”
  • In a light-hearted conversation about periods, someone might joke, “Are you ready to ride the crimson tide?”
  • Another person might ask, “How do you manage your schedule when you’re surfing the crimson tide?”

11. Aunt Ruby

This term is a euphemism for menstruation, referring to a woman’s monthly cycle. It is believed to have originated from the idea that a woman’s “aunt” comes to visit her during this time.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I can’t go swimming today, Aunt Ruby is in town.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual products, someone might ask, “Do you have any tips for dealing with Aunt Ruby?”
  • A person might sympathize with a friend by saying, “I hate when Aunt Ruby comes to visit.”

12. That Time of the Month

This phrase is a common euphemism for menstruation, referring to the regular monthly cycle that women experience. It is often used to avoid directly mentioning the word “period.”

  • For instance, a woman might say, “I’m not feeling well because it’s that time of the month.”
  • In a discussion about menstrual hygiene, someone might ask, “How do you manage everything during that time of the month?”
  • A person might express understanding by saying, “I know it can be tough during that time of the month.”

13. The Curse

This slang term is used to refer to menstruation, often implying the negative aspects or inconveniences associated with it. It suggests that menstruation is a burden or an unwanted occurrence.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I can’t go swimming because I’m cursed with the monthly curse.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual symptoms, someone might say, “I always experience terrible cramps during the curse.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “I wish I could escape the curse of menstruation.”

14. Auntie Dot

This slang term is another euphemism for menstruation, referring to a woman’s monthly cycle. It is believed to have originated from the idea that a woman’s “aunt” comes to visit her during this time, with “Dot” representing the dot-like appearance of menstrual blood.

  • For instance, a woman might say, “I need to stock up on supplies because Auntie Dot is coming.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual products, someone might ask, “What’s your preferred brand for Auntie Dot?”
  • A person might joke with a friend by saying, “Guess who’s coming to town? Auntie Dot!”

15. Riding the Cotton Pony

This slang phrase is a humorous and lighthearted way to refer to menstruation. It uses the image of riding a pony made of cotton to describe the experience.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I can’t go to the party tonight, I’m riding the cotton pony.”
  • In a conversation about period pain, someone might ask, “Do you experience any discomfort while riding the cotton pony?”
  • A person might use this phrase to make light of the situation by saying, “I’ll be riding the cotton pony for the next few days, so expect some mood swings.”

16. Moon Time

This term refers to the monthly cycle experienced by individuals with a uterus, during which the lining of the uterus is shed. “Moon Time” is a euphemism used to avoid directly mentioning menstruation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t go swimming today, it’s my moon time.”
  • In a conversation about reproductive health, someone might mention, “Moon time can vary in length for different individuals.”
  • A person discussing menstrual products might say, “I prefer to use eco-friendly options during my moon time.”

17. The Red Badge of Courage

This phrase is a literary reference to the novel by Stephen Crane, but it is also used as a euphemism for menstruation. It suggests that experiencing menstruation is a symbol of strength and endurance.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m wearing my red badge of courage today.”
  • In a discussion about gender equality, someone might mention, “Women should be proud of their red badge of courage.”
  • A person discussing menstrual stigma might say, “We need to break the taboo around the red badge of courage.”

18. The Painters are in

This phrase is a humorous way to refer to menstruation. It implies that the “painters” are redecorating the uterus.

  • For example, a person might say, “Sorry, I can’t go out tonight, the painters are in.”
  • In a conversation about period symptoms, someone might mention, “I always know when the painters are in because of my cramps.”
  • A person discussing period-related mood changes might say, “The painters are in, and I’m feeling irritable.”

19. The Red Sea

This phrase is a play on words, using the term “Red Sea” to refer to the flow of blood during menstruation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m swimming in the Red Sea today.”
  • In a discussion about period hygiene, someone might mention, “I always make sure to have enough supplies for when the Red Sea arrives.”
  • A person discussing period pain might say, “The Red Sea is causing me some serious discomfort.”

20. The Monthly Curse

This phrase humorously refers to menstruation as a “curse” that occurs every month.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m dealing with the monthly curse.”
  • In a conversation about period symptoms, someone might mention, “The monthly curse brings bloating and mood swings.”
  • A person discussing period-related cravings might say, “The monthly curse always makes me crave chocolate.”

21. Being on the Blob

This phrase is a euphemism for menstruating, referring to the physical appearance and texture of menstrual blood. It is often used in a light-hearted or humorous way.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Sorry, I can’t go swimming today, I’m on the blob.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Are you feeling okay? You seem a bit off.” And the response could be, “Yeah, just on the blob.”
  • A person might make plans and then cancel last minute, saying, “I can’t make it, I’m on the blob.”

22. Time of the Red Moon

This phrase refers to the time during which a person with a menstrual cycle is menstruating. The use of “red moon” symbolizes the monthly cycle and the color of menstrual blood.

  • For example, someone might say, “I won’t be able to go to the party tonight, it’s my time of the red moon.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual products, someone might ask, “What do you use during the time of the red moon?”
  • A person might mention their discomfort during menstruation by saying, “I always feel tired and crampy during the time of the red moon.”

23. The Red Wedding

This phrase is a playful reference to the popular television show “Game of Thrones,” where a significant event called the “Red Wedding” takes place. It is used to describe the occurrence of a person’s menstrual cycle.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe I got surprised by the Red Wedding again.”
  • In a conversation about tracking periods, a person might ask, “Do you use any apps to keep track of the Red Wedding?”
  • A person might mention their mood swings during their menstrual cycle by saying, “I always feel like I’m part of the Red Wedding.”

24. Crimson Tsunami

This phrase refers to a heavy menstrual flow, comparing it to a powerful and overwhelming natural phenomenon. It emphasizes the intensity and volume of menstrual blood.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t go out today, I’m dealing with a crimson tsunami.”
  • In a discussion about period products, someone might ask, “What do you find most effective for managing a crimson tsunami?”
  • A person might express their frustration with heavy flow by saying, “Dealing with a crimson tsunami every month can be exhausting.”

25. The Red River

This phrase refers to the flow of menstrual blood during a person’s period. It likens the continuous and steady nature of the flow to a river.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to change my tampon, the Red River is flowing.”
  • In a conversation about period symptoms, a person might ask, “Do you experience any cramps when the Red River starts?”
  • A person might talk about their period duration by saying, “The Red River usually lasts about five days for me.”

26. The Red Storm

This slang term refers to the menstrual period, which is the monthly shedding of the uterine lining in females. “The Red Storm” is used to describe the arrival of the period.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I can’t go swimming today, the red storm has arrived.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual products, someone might ask, “How do you manage the red storm?”
  • A person discussing menstrual health might say, “It’s important to track the red storm for any irregularities.”

27. Aunt Irma

This slang term is a euphemism for the menstrual period. It is a way to refer to menstruation without explicitly using the word.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Aunt Irma is visiting this week, so I might be a bit moody.”
  • In a conversation about period symptoms, someone might ask, “Does Aunt Irma bring you any cramps?”
  • A person discussing menstrual stigma might say, “Using code names like Aunt Irma perpetuates the shame around menstruation.”

28. The Red Alert

This slang term refers to the menstrual period, which is the monthly shedding of the uterine lining in females. “The Red Alert” is used to describe the onset of the period.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I need to stock up on supplies, the red alert is about to start.”
  • In a discussion about menstrual pain, someone might ask, “How do you manage the red alert cramps?”
  • A person discussing menstrual education might say, “It’s important to teach girls about the red alert and normalize the conversation around it.”

29. The Red Army

This slang term refers to the menstrual period, which is the monthly shedding of the uterine lining in females. “The Red Army” is used to describe the collective experience of menstruation among women.

  • For instance, a woman might say, “Joining the Red Army is a monthly battle.”
  • In a conversation about period products, someone might ask, “How does the Red Army handle heavy flow?”
  • A person discussing menstrual activism might say, “It’s time to destigmatize the Red Army and empower women to embrace their bodies.”

30. The Red Invasion

This slang term refers to the menstrual period, which is the monthly shedding of the uterine lining in females. “The Red Invasion” is used to describe the arrival and presence of the period.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I can’t go to the beach, the red invasion has begun.”
  • In a discussion about period cravings, someone might ask, “What food do you crave during the red invasion?”
  • A person advocating for menstrual equity might say, “No one should feel ashamed of the red invasion, it’s a natural part of life.”

31. The crimson curse

This term refers to the monthly shedding of the uterine lining, also known as menstruation. “The crimson curse” is a colloquial phrase used to describe this natural bodily process.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t go swimming today, I’m dealing with the crimson curse.”
  • In a conversation about reproductive health, someone might mention, “Many cultures have different names for menstruation, like ‘the crimson curse’.”
  • A person discussing period stigma might say, “Referring to menstruation as ‘the crimson curse’ perpetuates negative attitudes towards women’s bodies.”

32. That special time

This phrase is a euphemism used to refer to the menstrual cycle, which is the regular natural process that occurs in the female reproductive system. “That special time” is often used humorously to downplay the discomfort or inconvenience associated with menstruation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m not feeling my best during that special time of the month.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation among friends, someone might jokingly ask, “Are you ready for that special time?”
  • A person discussing period-related products might use this phrase, saying, “We offer a variety of products to help you feel more comfortable during that special time.”

33. The crimson tsunami

This phrase is a colorful metaphor used to describe the heavy flow of blood during menstruation. “The crimson tsunami” emphasizes the intensity and volume of menstrual bleeding.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to stay home today, I’m experiencing the crimson tsunami.”
  • In a humorous conversation about period-related challenges, someone might joke, “Beware of the crimson tsunami!”
  • A person discussing period education might say, “It’s important to understand that the crimson tsunami varies in intensity and duration for each individual.”

34. The red tide

This term is a euphemism used to refer to menstruation. “The red tide” draws a comparison between the natural phenomenon of a large mass of algae turning water red and the presence of menstrual blood.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can’t go to the beach during the red tide.”
  • In a conversation about period-related environmental concerns, someone might mention, “The red tide can have negative effects on marine life.”
  • A person discussing period stigma might say, “Using phrases like ‘the red tide’ perpetuates the idea that menstruation is dirty or unclean.”

35. The monthly flow

This phrase is a straightforward and descriptive way to refer to the regular discharge of blood and tissue from the uterus during menstruation. “The monthly flow” highlights the cyclical nature of this bodily process.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m experiencing the monthly flow right now.”
  • In a conversation about reproductive health, someone might mention, “The duration and intensity of the monthly flow can vary from person to person.”
  • A person discussing period education might use this phrase, saying, “Understanding the monthly flow is an important aspect of overall reproductive health.”

36. The monthly period

This term refers to the regular shedding of the uterine lining in women, which typically occurs once a month. It is a natural process that signifies fertility.

  • For example, “I’m experiencing the monthly period and need to use a pad.”
  • A person discussing reproductive health might say, “Understanding the monthly period is important for overall well-being.”
  • Another might ask, “What are some natural remedies to alleviate the discomfort during the monthly period?”

37. The crimson period

This phrase uses “crimson” to describe the color of blood during menstruation. It is a poetic way of referring to the monthly period.

  • For instance, “She knew her crimson period had arrived when she saw blood on her underwear.”
  • A person might write in their diary, “The crimson period has come, and I’m feeling a mix of emotions.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual products, someone might say, “I prefer using menstrual cups during my crimson period.”

38. The time of the crimson

Similar to the previous phrase, this slang uses “crimson” to describe the color of blood during menstruation. It emphasizes the duration or “time” of the period.

  • For example, “I’m currently in the time of the crimson and need to stock up on pads.”
  • A person might text their friend, “Hey, can we reschedule our plans? It’s the time of the crimson for me.”
  • In a discussion about menstrual hygiene, someone might ask, “What are the best ways to manage the time of the crimson?”

39. The monthly visitor

This phrase personifies menstruation as a “visitor” that arrives once a month. It is a euphemism for the monthly period.

  • For instance, “My monthly visitor is here, and I’m not looking forward to the cramps.”
  • A person might write in their journal, “The arrival of the monthly visitor always brings mixed emotions.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual symptoms, someone might say, “I experience mood swings when the monthly visitor comes.”

40. The red time

This slang phrase uses “red” to describe the color of blood during menstruation. It simplifies the term “menstruation” to “the red time.”

  • For example, “I’m currently in the red time and need to buy tampons.”
  • A person might tell their partner, “I’m not feeling well because of the red time.”
  • In a discussion about period products, someone might ask, “What are the best options for managing the red time?”

41. Auntie Flo

This is a playful and euphemistic term for a woman’s menstrual cycle. It is often used to refer to the arrival of a woman’s period.

  • For example, a person might say, “Auntie Flo is visiting this week, so I won’t be able to go swimming.”
  • In a conversation about reproductive health, someone might mention, “It’s important to track Auntie Flo’s visits to monitor your cycle.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling okay? Auntie Flo can be a real pain sometimes.”

42. Red wedding

This term is a humorous reference to a woman’s period, comparing it to the infamous “Red Wedding” episode from the TV show Game of Thrones. It is used to describe the onset of menstruation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I woke up to a surprise red wedding this morning.”
  • In a conversation about periods, a person might joke, “Every month, I feel like I’m attending my own personal red wedding.”
  • A friend might sympathize, “I hate when the red wedding crashes my plans.”

43. The red dot

This slang term refers to a woman’s period, likening it to a red dot or mark that appears during menstruation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t go swimming today because of the red dot.”
  • In a discussion about periods, a person might mention, “Sometimes the red dot catches me by surprise.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any remedies for dealing with the red dot?”

44. Auntie Flo is visiting

This phrase is a euphemistic way of saying that a woman is on her period. It is a lighthearted and playful expression.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t go to the beach today, Auntie Flo is visiting.”
  • In a conversation about periods, a person might mention, “Auntie Flo is here, so I need to be prepared with supplies.”
  • A friend might ask, “How are you feeling now that Auntie Flo is visiting?”

45. Aunt Irma is here

This expression is a humorous and euphemistic way of saying that a woman is on her period. It is often used to make light of the situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Aunt Irma is here, and she’s not leaving anytime soon.”
  • In a discussion about periods, a person might mention, “I always know when Aunt Irma is here because of the cramps.”
  • A friend might sympathize, “Aunt Irma can be a real pain, can’t she?”

46. That time of the month again

This is a phrase used to refer to the regular occurrence of a woman’s menstrual cycle. It implies that it is a predictable and recurring event.

  • For instance, a woman might say, “Ugh, it’s that time of the month again.”
  • In a conversation about hormonal changes, someone might mention, “During that time of the month, I experience mood swings.”
  • A person discussing menstrual products might say, “I always make sure to stock up on supplies for that time of the month.”

47. Being on the rag

This phrase is considered informal and somewhat derogatory. It refers to a woman being on her period, implying that she is using a rag or cloth as a makeshift sanitary product.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s on the rag, so she’s not feeling well.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual symptoms, a person might mention, “When I’m on the rag, I experience cramps.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you have any tips for dealing with discomfort while on the rag?”

48. The red tide is coming

This phrase uses a metaphor to compare a woman’s period to a natural phenomenon, specifically the rising and falling of ocean tides. It suggests that menstruation is an inevitable and powerful force.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can feel the red tide coming.”
  • In a conversation about menstrual cycles, a person might mention, “I track the red tide on my calendar.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you experience any physical changes when the red tide arrives?”

49. The crimson flow

This phrase uses imagery to describe the color of menstrual blood, comparing it to the deep red shade of the precious gemstone. It adds a poetic touch to the discussion of menstruation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m dealing with the crimson flow right now.”
  • In a conversation about period products, a person might mention, “I prefer using tampons to manage the crimson flow.”
  • Another person might ask, “How long does the crimson flow usually last for you?”

50. Time of the month blues

This phrase refers to the emotional and physical discomfort that some women experience during their menstrual cycle. It suggests that these feelings are a common occurrence during this time.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m experiencing the time of the month blues.”
  • In a conversation about self-care during menstruation, a person might mention, “I try to practice extra self-care when I have the time of the month blues.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you have any tips for managing the time of the month blues?”
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