Top 31 Slang For Perpetrator – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing someone who’s up to no good, finding the right slang can add an extra layer of flair to your conversations. Whether you’re talking about a mischief-maker or a troublemaker, our team has gathered the top slang terms for perpetrator that will have you speaking the language of the streets in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to expand your vocabulary with these edgy and expressive terms!

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1. Perp

This term is short for “perpetrator” and refers to someone who has committed a crime or is responsible for a wrongdoing.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We have a suspect, but we’re still looking for the perp.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might write, “The perp was apprehended after a high-speed chase.”
  • A witness might describe the perpetrator by saying, “The perp was wearing a black hoodie and had a tattoo on their arm.”

2. Culprit

This word is used to identify the person who is responsible for a crime or wrongdoing.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We’re still searching for the culprit in this case.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence clearly points to the defendant as the culprit.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police identify the culprit in the recent bank robbery.”

3. Wrongdoer

This term refers to someone who has committed an act that is considered morally or legally wrong.

  • For example, a teacher might scold a student by saying, “You are the wrongdoer in this situation.”
  • In a conversation about ethics, someone might say, “Society must hold wrongdoers accountable for their actions.”
  • A parent might discipline their child by saying, “You need to understand the consequences of being a wrongdoer.”

4. Offender

This word is used to describe someone who has violated a law or committed a criminal act.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We apprehended the offender and took them into custody.”
  • In a court proceeding, a judge might refer to the defendant as the offender.
  • A news report might state, “The offender was sentenced to five years in prison for their crimes.”

5. Criminal

This term is used to describe someone who has engaged in illegal activities and has been convicted of a crime.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We’re building a case against the criminal.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might say, “We need to find ways to rehabilitate criminals.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police arrest notorious criminal after months-long investigation.”

6. Delinquent

This term refers to a person, typically a young person, who regularly engages in illegal or antisocial behavior. It is often used to describe someone who has committed minor offenses or acts of disobedience.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “That student is a delinquent who constantly disrupts the class.”
  • In a news article about juvenile crime, a reporter might write, “The police apprehended several delinquents in connection with the vandalism.”
  • A parent might express concern by saying, “I’m worried that my child is hanging out with delinquents.”

7. Lawbreaker

This term is used to describe a person who violates the law or commits a crime. It encompasses a wide range of criminal activities and can refer to both minor and major offenses.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We need to catch that lawbreaker and bring them to justice.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence clearly shows that the defendant is a habitual lawbreaker.”
  • A concerned citizen might report a suspicious activity by saying, “I saw a potential lawbreaker trying to break into a car.”

8. Miscreant

This term is used to describe a person who behaves badly or engages in immoral or unethical actions. It is often used to convey a sense of moral judgment or disapproval.

  • For example, a teacher might scold a student by saying, “Stop acting like a miscreant and pay attention.”
  • In a newspaper editorial, a writer might criticize a public figure by writing, “The miscreant politician has repeatedly betrayed the public’s trust.”
  • A frustrated coworker might complain, “I can’t believe that miscreant stole my lunch from the office fridge.”

9. Malefactor

This term refers to a person who has committed a crime or engages in illegal activities. It is a more formal and old-fashioned term often used in legal or literary contexts.

  • For instance, a judge might refer to a defendant as a malefactor during a trial.
  • In a crime novel, the protagonist might be on a mission to bring the malefactor to justice.
  • A news reporter might use the term to describe a notorious criminal by saying, “The police have finally apprehended the malefactor responsible for a string of burglaries.”

10. Evildoer

This term is used to describe a person who intentionally does evil or morally wrong actions. It is often used in a dramatic or exaggerated manner to convey a sense of villainy.

  • For example, a superhero might confront an evildoer and say, “Your reign of terror ends now, evildoer!”
  • In a fantasy novel, the protagonist might embark on a quest to defeat an ancient evildoer.
  • A person expressing moral outrage might denounce a corrupt politician as an evildoer.
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11. Villain

A villain is a person who is known for their wicked or malicious actions. It is often used to describe someone who is the antagonist in a story or someone who has committed a heinous act.

  • For example, in superhero movies, the villain is often the main antagonist that the hero must defeat.
  • In a discussion about crime, one might say, “The police are searching for the villain responsible for the recent string of burglaries.”
  • A person might use the term in a metaphorical sense, saying, “Procrastination is the villain that keeps me from achieving my goals.”

12. Scoundrel

A scoundrel is a person who is dishonest, unscrupulous, or generally up to no good. It is often used to describe someone who engages in deceitful or immoral behavior.

  • For instance, in literature, a scoundrel might be a cunning and manipulative character.
  • In a conversation about politics, one might say, “That politician is a scoundrel who only cares about their own interests.”
  • A person might use the term in a playful or affectionate way, saying, “You’re such a scoundrel for stealing the last slice of pizza.”

13. Rascal

A rascal is a person who is playful, mischievous, or inclined to engage in minor acts of mischief. It is often used to describe someone who is clever and enjoys causing trouble in a harmless or amusing way.

  • For example, parents might affectionately refer to their mischievous child as a rascal.
  • In a discussion about pets, one might say, “My dog is such a rascal. He’s always getting into things he shouldn’t.”
  • A person might use the term to describe themselves, saying, “I was a bit of a rascal in my younger days, always pulling pranks on my friends.”

14. Rogue

A rogue is a person who is dishonest, deceitful, or untrustworthy. It is often used to describe someone who acts independently and without regard for rules or conventions.

  • For instance, in fantasy literature, a rogue might be a character who is skilled in stealth and cunning.
  • In a conversation about politics, one might say, “That politician is a rogue who cannot be trusted.”
  • A person might use the term in a more positive or endearing way, saying, “He may be a bit of a rogue, but he always knows how to have a good time.”

15. Outlaw

An outlaw is a person who has been declared as outside the protection of the law. It is often used to describe someone who has committed serious crimes or has intentionally chosen to live outside of society’s rules.

  • For example, in the Wild West, outlaws were often wanted by the law for their criminal activities.
  • In a discussion about rebellion, one might say, “Sometimes you have to be an outlaw to fight against injustice.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically, saying, “He’s an outlaw when it comes to fashion, always breaking the rules and creating his own style.”

16. Bandit

A bandit is a person who engages in illegal activities, often involving theft or robbery. It can also refer to an outlaw or someone who operates outside of the law.

  • For example, “The bandit robbed a bank and escaped with a bag of cash.”
  • In a fictional story, a character might be described as a “ruthless bandit.”
  • A person discussing crime might say, “Bandits often target vulnerable individuals or establishments.”

17. Thug

A thug is a term used to describe a violent or criminal person. It often implies involvement in illegal activities, such as robbery, assault, or organized crime.

  • For instance, “The thug threatened the shopkeeper with a knife.”
  • In a news report, an article might describe a group of individuals as “thugs” who were involved in a street brawl.
  • A person discussing crime rates might say, “The city has seen an increase in thug-related incidents.”

18. Hoodlum

A hoodlum is a term used to describe a person involved in criminal or antisocial behavior. It often refers to someone who engages in vandalism, theft, or other illicit activities.

  • For example, “The hoodlum spray-painted graffiti on the side of the building.”
  • In a discussion about neighborhood safety, someone might say, “We need to address the issue of hoodlums causing trouble in our community.”
  • A person discussing crime prevention might suggest, “Increasing police presence can help deter hoodlum activity.”

19. Gangster

A gangster is a member of a criminal organization or gang. They are often involved in organized crime, such as drug trafficking, extortion, or racketeering. The term “mobster” is often used interchangeably with gangster.

  • For instance, “The gangster controlled the illegal gambling operation.”
  • In a movie set in the 1920s, a character might be portrayed as a “notorious mobster.”
  • A person discussing the history of organized crime might mention famous gangsters like Al Capone.
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20. Mobster

A mobster is a member of a criminal organization or mob. They are often involved in organized crime, such as drug trafficking, extortion, or racketeering. The term “gangster” is often used interchangeably with mobster.

  • For example, “The mobster was arrested for his involvement in a money laundering scheme.”
  • In a discussion about the influence of organized crime, someone might say, “Mobsters have a long history of controlling certain industries.”
  • A person discussing the impact of mobsters might mention famous gangsters like John Gotti.

21. Con

A con is short for a confidence trickster, someone who deceives others by gaining their trust and then exploiting it for personal gain. The term “con” is often used to refer to a person who scams or swindles others.

  • For example, “He ran a con where he convinced people to invest in a fake business.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Watch out for that con artist who’s been targeting elderly people.”
  • A victim of a con might share their experience, “I fell for a con and lost all my savings.”

22. Swindler

A swindler is someone who tricks or deceives others, often for financial gain. It is a term used to describe individuals who engage in fraudulent activities or scams.

  • For instance, “He’s a notorious swindler who has cheated many people out of their money.”
  • In a discussion about scams, one might say, “Beware of swindlers who promise unrealistic returns on investments.”
  • A victim of a swindler might warn others, “Don’t fall for the smooth talk of a swindler like I did.”

23. Fraudster

A fraudster is a person who engages in fraudulent activities, such as identity theft, credit card scams, or Ponzi schemes. The term “fraudster” is often used to describe individuals who intentionally deceive others for financial gain.

  • For example, “The fraudster hacked into people’s bank accounts and stole their money.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might say, “Be careful not to fall victim to a fraudster posing as a legitimate company.”
  • A victim of a fraudster might share their story, “I was scammed by a fraudster pretending to be a charity organization.”

24. Trickster

A trickster is someone who uses deceit or cunning to deceive others. It is a term used to describe individuals who play tricks or engage in deceptive behavior for their own amusement or gain.

  • For instance, “He’s known as a trickster who always manages to fool people with his pranks.”
  • In a discussion about practical jokes, one might say, “Watch out for that trickster who likes to play elaborate pranks.”
  • A victim of a trickster might share their experience, “I was fooled by a trickster who pretended to be a fortune teller.”

25. Con artist

A con artist is a person who deceives others through elaborate schemes or manipulative tactics. They often gain the trust of their victims before exploiting them for financial gain. The term “con artist” is commonly used to describe individuals who engage in confidence tricks or scams.

  • For example, “The con artist convinced people to invest in a fake business with promises of high returns.”
  • In a discussion about financial fraud, someone might say, “Never trust a con artist who promises you easy money.”
  • A victim of a con artist might warn others, “Be careful not to fall for the tricks of a con artist like I did.”

26. Hustler

A hustler is someone who deceives or tricks others, often for personal gain. This term is commonly used to describe someone who engages in illegal or dishonest activities for financial benefit.

  • For example, “He’s a hustler who scams people out of their money.”
  • In a discussion about street crime, someone might say, “Watch out for the hustlers in this neighborhood.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Don’t fall for that hustler’s smooth talk.”

27. Crook

A crook is a term used to describe someone who engages in illegal activities, particularly theft or fraud. It is often used to refer to someone who is dishonest or untrustworthy.

  • For instance, “He’s a crook who stole my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about organized crime, someone might say, “The city is infested with crooks.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful, there are crooks lurking around here.”

28. Scammer

A scammer is someone who deceives or tricks others, often for financial gain. They typically use fraudulent schemes or dishonest tactics to exploit their victims.

  • For example, “I was scammed by an online scammer who promised me a job.”
  • In a discussion about internet safety, someone might say, “Beware of scammers trying to steal your personal information.”
  • A person might share their experience, “I received a call from a scammer pretending to be from the IRS.”

29. Malevolent

Malevolent is an adjective used to describe someone who has ill intentions or desires to harm others. It refers to a person who is intentionally and deliberately harmful or evil.

  • For instance, “He has a malevolent nature and enjoys causing pain.”
  • In a conversation about villains, someone might say, “The antagonist in the movie is a malevolent character.”
  • A person might describe a harmful act, “His actions were driven by a malevolent intent.”

30. Maleficent

Maleficent is an adjective used to describe someone who is extremely evil or harmful. It is often used to describe someone who intentionally causes harm or misfortune to others.

  • For example, “The maleficent witch cast a spell on the kingdom.”
  • In a discussion about fairy tales, someone might say, “Maleficent is the classic example of a maleficent character.”
  • A person might describe a harmful action, “He committed a maleficent act that caused great suffering.”

31. Perpetrator

This is a slang term used to refer to a person who commits a crime or wrongdoing. It is often used in law enforcement or criminal justice contexts.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We apprehended the perp and took him into custody.”
  • In a news report about a robbery, the anchor might mention, “The perp was caught on surveillance camera.”
  • A detective might ask a witness, “Can you provide any information about the perp’s appearance?”