Top 64 Slang For Phone Call – Meaning & Usage

In a world dominated by text messages and social media, phone calls may seem like a thing of the past. But don’t hang up just yet! We’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms for phone calls that will have you dialing up your friends in no time. From old-school classics to trendy new phrases, we’ve rounded up the most popular ways to talk about making a call. So grab your phone and get ready to speak the language of the digital age!

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1. Give me a tinkle

This phrase is a playful way to ask someone to give you a call. “Tinkle” is used as a euphemism for the sound of a phone ringing.

  • For example, if you want a friend to call you, you might say, “Hey, give me a tinkle later.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll give you a tinkle tomorrow to discuss the plans.”
  • If you’re expecting an important call, you might tell someone, “If you need me, just give me a tinkle.”

2. Drop me a line

This phrase is used to request someone to contact you, typically through written communication. It can refer to any form of communication, not just a phone call.

  • For instance, if you want someone to email you, you might say, “Drop me a line whenever you get a chance.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Can you drop me a line with the details?”
  • If you prefer written communication over phone calls, you might tell someone, “If you have any questions, feel free to drop me a line.”

3. Ring me up

This phrase is a straightforward way to ask someone to call you. “Ring” is used as a synonym for making a phone call.

  • For example, if you want a friend to call you, you might say, “Ring me up when you’re free.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “If you have any issues, don’t hesitate to ring me up.”
  • If you’re expecting an important call, you might tell someone, “Make sure to ring me up as soon as you hear anything.”

4. Hit me on the horn

This phrase uses “horn” as a slang term for a telephone. It is a more casual way to ask someone to call you.

  • For instance, if you want someone to call you, you might say, “Hey, hit me on the horn later.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Can you hit me on the horn when you have a moment?”
  • If you prefer phone calls over other forms of communication, you might tell someone, “If you need to reach me, just hit me on the horn.”

5. Buzz me

This phrase is a casual way to ask someone to call you. “Buzz” is used as a metaphor for the sound of a phone ringing.

  • For example, if you want a friend to call you, you might say, “Hey, buzz me later.”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “Can you buzz me with the details?”
  • If you’re expecting an important call, you might tell someone, “If anyone asks for me, just buzz me.”

6. Dial me up

This phrase is used to ask someone to call you on the phone. It implies that you want the person to initiate the phone call.

  • For example, you might say to a friend, “Hey, if you have any questions, just dial me up.”
  • In a business context, you might tell a colleague, “If you need any assistance, feel free to dial me up.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Feeling bored, someone dial me up and let’s chat!”

7. Give me a buzz

This phrase is used to ask someone to call you on the phone. It suggests that you want the person to contact you for a conversation.

  • For instance, you might say to a friend, “When you have a moment, give me a buzz and we can catch up.”
  • In a work setting, you might tell a coworker, “If you need any help, give me a buzz and I’ll be there.”
  • A person might send a text message saying, “I have some exciting news. Give me a buzz when you’re free!”

8. Shoot me a text

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you a text message. It implies that you prefer to communicate via text rather than a phone call.

  • For example, you might say to a friend, “If you have any updates, shoot me a text.”
  • In a casual conversation, you might tell someone, “If you want to make plans, just shoot me a text.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Feeling lonely, anyone wants to chat? Shoot me a text!”

9. Phone me

This phrase is used to ask someone to call you on the phone. It is a more formal way of requesting a phone call.

  • For instance, you might say to a colleague, “If you need to discuss the project, please phone me.”
  • In a professional setting, you might tell a client, “If you have any questions, please phone me directly.”
  • A person might send an email saying, “I would like to schedule a meeting. Please phone me at your earliest convenience.”

10. Hit me up

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact you, either through a phone call or any other means of communication.

  • For example, you might say to a friend, “If you’re free this weekend, hit me up and we can hang out.”
  • In a social setting, you might tell someone, “If you want to go out for dinner, hit me up and we can make plans.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Looking for recommendations for a good book to read. Hit me up with your suggestions!”

11. Call me up

This phrase is used to ask someone to call you on the phone. It implies a desire for a conversation or connection.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey, I heard about your promotion. Call me up and tell me all about it!”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “I miss you. Call me up tonight so we can talk.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “If you need anything while you’re away, just call me up.”

12. Reach out to me

This phrase is used to invite someone to contact you by phone. It suggests a willingness to communicate or offer assistance.

  • For instance, a colleague might say, “If you have any questions about the project, feel free to reach out to me.”
  • In a customer service context, a representative might say, “If you need help with your account, please reach out to me.”
  • A friend might post on social media, “Going through a tough time. Reach out to me if you need to talk.”

13. Give me a jingle

This phrase is a lighthearted way of requesting a phone call. It’s often used in a friendly or casual context.

  • For example, a grandparent might say, “I haven’t heard from you in a while. Give me a jingle sometime.”
  • A friend might text, “I’m bored. Give me a jingle and let’s catch up.”
  • In a playful manner, someone might say, “I miss the sound of your voice. Give me a jingle when you have a chance.”

14. Dial me

This phrase is a direct request for someone to call you on the phone. It’s a concise way of asking for a conversation.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “I have some information to share. Dial me when you’re free.”
  • A family member might text, “We need to discuss our plans. Dial me later.”
  • In a professional context, a client might email, “I have some questions. Can you dial me at your earliest convenience?”

15. Get in touch with me

This phrase is used to invite someone to contact you, typically by phone. It suggests a desire for communication or connection.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “If you have any inquiries, please get in touch with me.”
  • A friend might post on social media, “I’m feeling lonely. Get in touch with me if you want to chat.”
  • A colleague might say, “I have some ideas to discuss. Get in touch with me when you have a moment.”

16. Ring me

This phrase is used to ask someone to call you on the phone. It implies that you want the person to initiate a phone call with you.

  • For example, “Hey, if you need anything, just ring me.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll ring you later to discuss our plans.”
  • Someone might text, “Can you ring me when you get a chance?”

17. Hit me on the blower

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to call you. “Blower” is a slang term for a telephone, and “hit me” means to contact or call someone.

  • For instance, “If you need to talk, hit me on the blower.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll be out of town, but you can hit me on the blower if you need anything.”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “I have some news to share. Hit me on the blower when you’re free.”

18. Dial my digits

This phrase is used to ask someone to call you. “Dial my digits” refers to entering your phone number into a phone’s keypad to initiate a call.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to dial my digits.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always here to help. Just dial my digits.”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “I’m having trouble with my computer. Can you dial my digits and guide me through it?”

19. Give me a shout

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to call you. It implies that you want the person to reach out to you through a phone call.

  • For instance, “If you need any assistance, give me a shout.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll be in town next week. Give me a shout if you want to hang out.”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “I have some exciting news. Give me a shout when you have a moment.”

20. Text me

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you a text message instead of calling you. It indicates that you prefer to communicate through text.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to text me.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a meeting right now. Can you text me instead?”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “I’ll be a bit busy today, but you can text me if you need anything.”

21. Call me

This phrase is an informal way of asking someone to contact you via phone. It implies that you want the person to call you.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I have some exciting news to share, call me!”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’ll be home in 10 minutes, call me when you’re ready to leave.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a social media post, saying, “Feeling lonely, call me for a chat!”

22. Hit me on my cell

This slang phrase means to reach out to someone using their cellphone number. It suggests that the person wants to be contacted specifically on their mobile device.

  • For instance, someone might say, “If you need anything, hit me on my cell.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “I’m running late, hit me on my cell if you need to reach me.”
  • A friend might post on social media, “Going out for the night, hit me on my cell if you want to join!”

23. Phone me up

This phrase means to call someone on the telephone. It is a more casual and informal way of asking someone to contact you.

  • For example, a person might say, “I haven’t talked to you in ages, phone me up sometime!”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I have some exciting news, phone me up when you’re free.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a social media post, saying, “Bored at home, phone me up for a chat!”

24. Give me a ring

This phrase is a colloquial way of asking someone to call you. It suggests that the person should contact you by phone.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I miss hearing your voice, give me a ring sometime!”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “I need to talk to you about something important, give me a ring when you can.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a social media post, saying, “Feeling lonely, give me a ring and let’s catch up!”

25. Reach me on my mobile

This phrase means to get in touch with someone using their mobile phone. It implies that the person wants to be contacted specifically on their cellphone.

  • For example, someone might say, “If you need anything, reach me on my mobile.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “I’ll be out of the office, reach me on my mobile if you have any questions.”
  • A friend might post on social media, “Going on vacation, reach me on my mobile if you want to chat!”

26. Give me a holler

This phrase is a casual way of asking someone to call you. It implies that you want the person to reach out to you by phone.

  • For example, “I’ll be free tonight, so give me a holler if you want to hang out.”
  • If you’re trying to make plans with a friend, you might say, “Give me a holler when you’re ready to meet up.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you give me a holler later? I have something important to discuss.”

27. Buzz me up

This slang phrase is often used to ask someone to call you when they arrive at a specific location. It suggests that you want the person to let you know they have reached their destination.

  • For instance, if you’re expecting a friend to come over, you might say, “When you get to my apartment building, buzz me up.”
  • If you’re meeting someone at a restaurant, you could say, “Buzz me up when you arrive, and I’ll come out to meet you.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you buzz me up when you reach the office? I’ll be waiting for you.”

28. Text me up

This phrase is a slang way of asking someone to send you a text message. It implies that you want the person to reach out to you through a text.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, just text me up and I’ll help you out.”
  • If you’re waiting for someone to send you information, you might say, “Text me up with the details when you have them.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you text me up later? I want to talk about something.”

29. Call me on my cell

This phrase is a straightforward way of asking someone to call you on your cellphone. It specifies that you want the person to reach out to you using your mobile phone.

  • For instance, “If you need anything, just call me on my cell and I’ll be there.”
  • If you’re expecting an important call, you might say, “Please call me on my cell if there are any updates.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you call me on my cell later? I need to discuss something with you.”

30. Hit me on my mobile

This slang phrase is another way of asking someone to call you on your cellphone. It suggests that you want the person to reach out to you using your mobile phone.

  • For example, “If you want to meet up, just hit me on my mobile and we’ll make plans.”
  • If you’re waiting for someone to call you, you could say, “Feel free to hit me on my mobile whenever you’re ready.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you hit me on my mobile later? I want to talk about something important.”

31. Phone me on my cell

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to call you on your cellphone. It implies that you prefer to be contacted through your mobile device instead of a landline phone.

  • For example, “If you need anything, just phone me on my cell.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be out of the office, so phone me on my cell if you need to reach me.”
  • Another might text, “I can’t talk right now, but phone me on my cell later.”

32. Give me a shout-out

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to give you a call. It is a casual way of requesting a phone call.

  • For instance, “When you have a chance, give me a shout-out.”
  • A person might say, “I have some exciting news to share. Give me a shout-out when you’re free.”
  • Another might text, “I miss talking to you. Give me a shout-out sometime.”

33. Dial me on my mobile

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to call you on your mobile phone. It emphasizes that you want to be contacted using your cellphone.

  • For example, “If you need to reach me, dial me on my mobile.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be traveling, so please dial me on my mobile if you need to get in touch.”
  • Another might text, “I left my landline phone at home, so dial me on my mobile instead.”

34. Reach me on my cell

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to contact you on your cellphone. It implies that you are more easily reachable through your mobile device.

  • For instance, “If you can’t reach me at home, reach me on my cell.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be out of town, so please reach me on my cell if you need to talk.”
  • Another might text, “I have bad reception at home, so please reach me on my cell instead.”

35. Give me a buzz on my cell

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to give you a call on your cellphone. It suggests a quick and informal phone call.

  • For example, “When you have a moment, give me a buzz on my cell.”
  • A person might say, “I have some urgent news to share. Give me a buzz on my cell as soon as possible.”
  • Another might text, “I’m bored and need someone to talk to. Give me a buzz on my cell.”

36. Text me on my cell

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a text message to your cellphone instead of calling. It implies that you prefer to communicate via text rather than a phone call.

  • For example, “Text me on my cell if you have any updates.”
  • You might say, “I don’t answer unknown numbers, so please text me on my cell.”
  • When making plans, someone might say, “Text me on my cell with the details so I can save them.”

37. Ring up

This term is used to refer to making a phone call. It can be used in both formal and informal contexts.

  • For instance, “I’ll ring up my friend to see if they want to join us.”
  • You might hear someone say, “I need to ring up the doctor’s office to schedule an appointment.”
  • When discussing a missed call, you might say, “They rang me up, but I couldn’t answer at the time.”

38. Dial up

This phrase comes from the days of rotary phones when one had to physically rotate a dial to enter the phone number they wanted to call.

  • For example, “I need to dial up my mom to let her know I’ll be late.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you dial up the restaurant and make a reservation?”
  • When reminiscing about older technology, you might say, “Back in the day, we had to dial up our friends to talk on the phone.”

39. Buzz

This term is used to suggest making a phone call to someone. It implies a quick and casual conversation.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a buzz later to discuss the details.”
  • You might hear someone say, “I need to buzz my friend and see if they’re free tonight.”
  • When asking someone to reach out, you might say, “Give me a buzz when you have a chance.”

40. Give a bell

This phrase is a slang term used to mean making a phone call to someone. It can be used in both formal and informal contexts.

  • For example, “I’ll give my sister a bell to let her know I’m running late.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to give the bank a bell and sort out this issue.”
  • When discussing contacting someone, you might say, “Give me a bell when you’re ready to talk.”

41. Hit up

This phrase means to reach out or contact someone, usually through a phone call or text message. It can be used to casually ask someone to call you or to initiate a conversation.

  • For example, “Hey, hit me up later and we can make plans.”
  • A friend might say, “I hit up our mutual friend to see if she wants to join us.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Looking for a good restaurant in the area, hit me up with recommendations!”

42. Phone up

This term simply means to call someone on the phone. It is a more formal or traditional way of referring to making a phone call.

  • For instance, “I’ll phone up the restaurant and make a reservation.”
  • A parent might say, “I need to phone up the school and ask about the schedule.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you phone up the pizza place and order for us?”

43. Call up

Similar to “phone up,” this phrase means to call someone on the phone. It can be used interchangeably with “phone up” and has the same meaning.

  • For example, “I’ll call up my friend and see if she wants to join us.”
  • A coworker might say, “I need to call up the client and discuss the project.”
  • A teenager might text, “I’m going to call up my crush and ask them out!”

44. Reach out

To “reach out” means to initiate contact with someone, usually through a phone call, email, or social media message. It implies a desire to connect or communicate with someone.

  • For instance, “I’ll reach out to my cousin and see if she can help us.”
  • A colleague might say, “I reached out to the speaker and invited them to our conference.”
  • A person might post on social media, “If anyone needs to talk, feel free to reach out. I’m here for you!”

45. Give a shout

This phrase means to call someone on the phone. It is a more casual and informal way of referring to making a phone call.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a shout later and we can catch up.”
  • A friend might say, “Give me a shout when you’re ready to leave.”
  • Someone might text, “I’ll give my mom a shout and ask if she can pick us up.”

46. Ring someone’s phone

This phrase is used to indicate making a phone call to someone. It implies the action of dialing a person’s phone number and initiating a conversation.

  • For example, “I’ll ring your phone later to discuss the details.”
  • A friend might say, “Ring my phone when you’re ready to go.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you ring my phone so I can find it?”

47. Dial someone’s digits

This slang phrase refers to dialing or calling someone’s phone number. It emphasizes the action of physically entering the numbers on a phone keypad to make a call.

  • For instance, “I dialed his digits, but he didn’t answer.”
  • A teenager might say, “I’ll dial your digits after school.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you dial his digits and see if he’s available?”

48. Buzz someone’s line

This phrase means to call or contact someone. It suggests the act of buzzing or making a noise on someone’s phone line to get their attention.

  • For example, “I’ll buzz your line tomorrow to discuss the project.”
  • A colleague might say, “Buzz my line if you need any help.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you buzz her line and ask if she’s free for a chat?”

49. Give someone a ring

This slang phrase means to call or phone someone. It implies the action of giving a person a call to initiate a conversation or relay information.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a ring when I arrive.”
  • A parent might say, “Give me a ring if you need anything.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you give him a ring and ask about the meeting?”

50. Hit someone up on the phone

This phrase means to contact or call someone. It suggests the act of reaching out to someone via phone to have a conversation or ask a question.

  • For example, “I’ll hit you up on the phone later to discuss the details.”
  • A friend might say, “Hit me up on the phone if you need to talk.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you hit her up on the phone and see if she’s available?”

51. Phone someone up

This phrase means to call someone using a phone. It is often used when someone wants to reach out to someone else for a conversation.

  • For example, “I need to phone someone up to ask about the meeting time.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll phone my friend up later to see if she wants to grab dinner.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you phone up the restaurant and make a reservation for tonight?”

52. Call someone on the horn

This phrase refers to making a phone call to someone. “Horn” is a slang term for a telephone.

  • For instance, “I need to call my mom on the horn and ask her for a recipe.”
  • A person might say, “I called my friend on the horn to discuss our upcoming trip.”
  • Another might mention, “I’ll call the office on the horn and let them know I’ll be late.”

53. Reach someone on the blower

This phrase means to contact or reach someone by phone. “Blower” is slang for a telephone.

  • For example, “I couldn’t reach him on his cell, so I tried to reach him on the blower.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll try to reach the customer on the blower and resolve the issue.”
  • Another might mention, “I reached my friend on the blower to invite her to the party.”

54. Give someone a buzz

This phrase means to call someone on the phone. It is often used when someone wants to reach out to someone else for a conversation.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a buzz later to discuss the project.”
  • A person might say, “I gave my friend a buzz to catch up on the latest news.”
  • Another might mention, “I need to give the doctor a buzz and schedule an appointment.”

55. Ring someone’s cell

This phrase means to call someone on their cellphone. It is often used when someone wants to reach out to someone else for a conversation.

  • For example, “I’ll ring my friend’s cell and see if she’s available for lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I rang his cell, but he didn’t answer. I’ll try again later.”
  • Another might mention, “I need to ring the office’s cell to inform them about the change in plans.”

56. Dial someone’s number

This phrase means to call someone by inputting their phone number into a telephone or mobile device and initiating the call.

  • For example, “I need to dial someone’s number to ask them a question.”
  • A person might say, “I dialed her number, but she didn’t answer.”
  • In a conversation about contacting someone, someone might ask, “Did you dial his number yet?”

57. Give a ring

This slang phrase means to make a phone call to someone. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a ring later to discuss the details.”
  • A person might say, “I gave her a ring, but she didn’t pick up.”
  • In a discussion about communication, someone might mention, “I prefer giving a ring instead of sending a text message.”

58. Ring someone’s bell

This phrase means to make a phone call to someone. It is a playful way of referring to a phone call.

  • For example, “I need to ring her bell and ask about our plans.”
  • A person might say, “I rang his bell, but he didn’t answer.”
  • In a conversation about contacting someone, someone might ask, “Did you ring her bell yet?”

59. Give someone a jingle

This slang phrase means to make a phone call to someone. It is a lighthearted way of referring to a phone call.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a jingle tomorrow to discuss the details.”
  • A person might say, “I gave him a jingle, but he was busy.”
  • In a discussion about communication, someone might mention, “I like giving someone a jingle instead of sending an email.”

60. Hit someone up on the blower

This phrase means to make a phone call to someone. “Blower” is a slang term for a telephone.

  • For example, “I’ll hit him up on the blower and see if he wants to hang out.”
  • A person might say, “I hit her up on the blower, but she didn’t answer.”
  • In a conversation about contacting someone, someone might ask, “Have you hit him up on the blower yet?”

61. Buzz someone’s mobile

This phrase means to call someone on their mobile phone. “Buzz” is a colloquial term for making a phone call, and “mobile” refers to a mobile phone.

  • For example, “I’ll buzz you on your mobile when I’m ready to meet up.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll buzz your mobile later to discuss our plans.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you buzz my mobile when you get a chance?”

62. Hit someone up on the telephone

This phrase means to contact someone by calling them on the telephone. “Hit someone up” is slang for reaching out to someone, and “telephone” refers to the device used to make the call.

  • For instance, “I’ll hit you up on the telephone tomorrow to discuss the details.”
  • A person might say, “I hit up my friend on the telephone to catch up.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you hit me up on the telephone later?”

63. Call someone on the cell

This phrase means to make a phone call to someone’s mobile phone. “Call” is a common term for making a phone call, and “cell” is short for “cellular,” referring to a mobile phone.

  • For example, “I’ll call you on the cell when I arrive.”
  • A friend might say, “I called her on the cell to let her know I’ll be late.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you call me on the cell instead of the landline?”

64. Phone someone’s line

This phrase means to call someone’s phone number. “Phone” is a general term for making a phone call, and “line” refers to the connection used to make the call.

  • For instance, “I’ll phone your line later to discuss the details.”
  • A person might say, “I phoned his line, but he didn’t answer.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you phone my line at 5 PM?”
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