Top 58 Slang For Phone Number – Meaning & Usage

Phone numbers are an essential part of modern communication, but did you know that there are slang terms for them too? Whether you’re looking to impress your friends or simply stay up-to-date with the latest lingo, our team has got you covered. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang for phone numbers that will have you dialing with style. Get ready to add some flair to your digits and become the talk of the town!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Digits

Refers to the numerical characters that make up a phone number. It is a slang term used to indicate a phone number.

  • For example, “Can you give me your digits?”
  • A person might say, “I just got her digits, so I can call her later.”
  • In a conversation about exchanging contact information, someone might ask, “Can you write down your digits for me?”

2. Line

Used to refer to a phone number or the connection to a phone service provider. It can also mean a specific phone line in a household or business.

  • For instance, “What’s your line? I’ll give you a call.”
  • A person might mention, “I have two phone lines at home, one for personal use and one for work.”
  • In a discussion about troubleshooting phone issues, someone might say, “I need to check the line and see if there’s a problem with the connection.”

3. Contact

Refers to a person’s phone number or contact information stored in a phone’s address book. It can also mean reaching out to someone via phone.

  • For example, “I lost all my contacts when my phone crashed.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have her contact? I need to call her.”
  • In a conversation about keeping in touch, someone might say, “I’ll add you to my contacts so I can reach you easily.”

4. Cell

Short for “cellular,” it refers to a mobile phone or a mobile phone number. It is commonly used as a slang term for a phone number.

  • For instance, “What’s your cell? I’ll text you the details.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t find my cell. Have you seen it?”
  • In a discussion about the convenience of mobile phones, someone might mention, “Having a cell means you’re always reachable.”

5. Digits of gold

Refers to a phone number that is considered valuable or special in some way. It can be a memorable or easy-to-remember phone number.

  • For example, “He has the digits of gold. Everyone wants his number.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been trying to get a hold of a business with digits of gold, but they’re always busy.”
  • In a conversation about lucky phone numbers, someone might mention, “Having digits of gold can bring you good fortune.”

6. Phone digits

This term refers to the numerical sequence used to identify a phone line. It typically consists of a combination of numbers and sometimes includes special characters, such as hyphens or parentheses.

  • For instance, when asked for their contact information, someone might say, “Here’s my phone digits: 555-123-4567.”
  • In a conversation about privacy, someone might say, “I always use a different set of phone digits when signing up for online services.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give me your phone digits so I can add you to my contacts?”

7. Number code

This term refers to the unique code assigned to a phone line. It is used to identify a specific phone number within a larger system.

  • For example, when setting up a new phone, a user might be asked to enter their number code.
  • In a discussion about security, someone might say, “Make sure to keep your number code private to protect your phone number.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s your number code? I need to call you.”

8. Tele digits

This term refers to the numerical sequence used to identify a telephone line. It is similar to “phone digits” and is often used interchangeably.

  • For instance, when asked for their contact information, someone might say, “Here’s my tele digits: 555-123-4567.”
  • In a conversation about communication, someone might say, “I prefer using tele digits instead of email.”
  • A person might ask, “What are your tele digits? I need to reach you.”

9. Call digits

This term refers to the numerical sequence used to make a phone call. It is the set of digits that need to be dialed to connect with a specific phone line.

  • For example, when giving someone your contact information, you might say, “Here’s my call digits: 555-123-4567.”
  • In a discussion about international calling, someone might say, “Make sure to include the country code in the call digits when dialing overseas.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give me your call digits so I can call you later?”

10. Mobile code

This term specifically refers to the numerical sequence used to identify a mobile or cell phone line. It is similar to “phone digits” but indicates that the number is associated with a mobile device.

  • For instance, when asked for their contact information, someone might say, “Here’s my mobile code: 555-123-4567.”
  • In a conversation about cell phone plans, someone might say, “I’m thinking of switching providers, but I want to keep my mobile code.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s your mobile code? I need to send you a text message.”

11. Phone line

Refers to the physical connection between a telephone and a network or service provider. The term “phone line” is often used to indicate the availability of a working telephone connection.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to fix my phone line because I can’t make any calls.”
  • In a discussion about internet connectivity, a user might ask, “Does your house have a dedicated phone line for internet access?”
  • A customer might complain, “I’ve been waiting for days for the technician to come and repair my phone line.”

12. Dial code

The numerical code used to identify a specific geographic region for telephone calls. The term “dial code” refers to the digits that need to be dialed before the actual phone number to connect a call to a specific area.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The dial code for New York City is 212.”
  • When discussing long-distance calling, a user might ask, “What’s the dial code for calling internationally?”
  • A traveler might inquire, “Can you tell me the dial code for this city? I need to make a call.”

13. Ring digits

Refers to the numerical sequence used to identify a specific telephone line. The term “ring digits” emphasizes the digits that need to be dialed to reach a particular phone number.

  • For example, someone might ask, “What are the ring digits for the local pizza place?”
  • In a discussion about phone scams, a user might warn, “Don’t give out your ring digits to anyone you don’t trust.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t remember the ring digits for that contact. Let me check my phonebook.”

14. Call code

The numerical code used to identify a specific country for international telephone calls. The term “call code” refers to the digits that need to be dialed before the actual phone number to connect a call to a specific country.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The call code for the United States is +1.”
  • When discussing traveling abroad, a user might ask, “What’s the call code for calling back home?”
  • A person might say, “I need to add the call code before dialing this international number.”

15. Tele code

A numerical code used to identify a specific exchange or central office within a telephone network. The term “tele code” refers to the digits that need to be dialed after the area code and before the actual phone number.

  • For example, someone might say, “The tele code for this neighborhood is 555.”
  • In a discussion about phone systems, a user might ask, “Do you need to dial the tele code for local calls?”
  • A person might say, “I’m having trouble connecting to a specific tele code. Is there an issue with the network?”

16. Cell digits

Refers to the numerical sequence used to identify a mobile phone. It is often used in a casual or slang context.

  • For example, “Hey, can you give me your cell digits?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll text you my cell digits so we can stay in touch.”
  • In a conversation about phone plans, someone might ask, “How many cell digits do you have on your plan?”

17. Phone contact

A term used to refer to a phone number that can be used to reach someone. It emphasizes the ability to establish communication with a person through their phone.

  • For instance, “I lost his phone contact, so I can’t reach him anymore.”
  • When exchanging numbers, one might say, “Let’s exchange phone contacts so we can stay connected.”
  • In a discussion about networking, someone might mention, “Having a wide phone contact list can be beneficial for career opportunities.”

18. Number line

A slang term for a phone number. It implies that the digits make up a line of numbers that can be dialed to establish a connection.

  • For example, “Can I have your number line so I can call you later?”
  • In a conversation about prank calls, someone might say, “I used a random number line to make the call.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s your number line? I need to add it to my contacts.”

19. Call line

Refers to the specific sequence of numbers used to make a phone call. It highlights the action of calling someone through their phone number.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you my call line so you can reach me.”
  • When discussing missed calls, one might say, “I saw a missed call on my phone, but I didn’t recognize the call line.”
  • In a conversation about international calls, someone might ask, “Do you have a different call line for international calls?”

20. Mobile digits

A colloquial term for the numerical sequence that represents a mobile phone. It suggests that the digits are associated with a mobile device.

  • For example, “Can you give me your mobile digits so I can add you to my contacts?”
  • When discussing phone plans, one might ask, “How many mobile digits do you have on your plan?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll text you my mobile digits so we can stay connected.”

21. Phone code

This refers to the three-digit code that identifies a specific geographic region for telephone calls. It is often used when referring to the first three digits of a phone number.

  • For instance, “I need to call my friend in New York. What’s the phone code for that area?”
  • When discussing long-distance calls, someone might ask, “Do I need to include the phone code when dialing?”
  • A person might mention, “I have a different phone code for my home and office numbers.”

22. Dial digits

This term refers to the individual numbers that make up a phone number. It emphasizes the action of dialing or entering these digits to make a phone call.

  • For example, “I had to dial seven digits to reach the local pizza place.”
  • When discussing a complicated phone number, someone might say, “Remember to dial all the digits, including the area code.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please repeat the dial digits for the conference call?”

23. Contact info

This is a general term that encompasses various ways to reach someone, including their phone number. It can refer to any means of communication, such as email, social media, or physical address.

  • For instance, “Please provide your contact info so we can get in touch.”
  • When exchanging information, someone might say, “Let’s swap contact info so we can stay connected.”
  • A person might mention, “I keep all my contact info in my phone’s address book.”

24. Telephone digits

This term refers to the individual numbers that make up a phone number. It emphasizes that these digits are specific to a telephone or phone line.

  • For example, “I need to memorize my grandmother’s telephone digits.”
  • When discussing the length of a phone number, someone might say, “Most telephone digits in this country are ten digits long.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please write down the telephone digits for me?”

25. Phone tag

This term refers to a situation where two or more people repeatedly try to reach each other by phone but keep missing each other’s calls. It can also refer to the act of leaving voicemails back and forth without actually speaking to each other.

  • For instance, “I’ve been playing phone tag with my doctor all day.”
  • When discussing a frustrating communication experience, someone might say, “I hate playing phone tag with customer service.”
  • A person might mention, “We finally connected after a few rounds of phone tag.”

26. Mobile

This term refers to a portable telephone that can make and receive calls wirelessly. “Mobile” is often used as a shortened version of “mobile phone” or “cellphone”.

  • For example, “I left my mobile at home, can I use yours to make a call?”
  • A person might say, “I can’t live without my mobile, it’s my lifeline.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any good mobile recommendations?”

27. Dial

To “dial” means to input a telephone number using a rotary or keypad to initiate a call. The term comes from the early days of telephones when rotary dials were used to select numbers.

  • For instance, “I’ll dial your number and see if you pick up.”
  • A person might say, “I dialed the wrong number and ended up talking to a stranger.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you dial the pizza place and order for us?”

28. Buzz

This term is used to describe a phone call or to indicate that someone’s phone is ringing or vibrating. “Buzz” can also refer to the sound a phone makes when it receives a call or message.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a buzz later to discuss the details.”
  • A person might say, “My phone keeps buzzing, but there are no notifications.”
  • Another might ask, “Did you hear that buzz? Someone’s phone is ringing.”

29. Ring-up

To “ring-up” means to make a phone call or to initiate a conversation over the phone. The term “ring-up” is often used in informal or colloquial contexts.

  • For instance, “I’ll ring you up tomorrow to finalize the plans.”
  • A person might say, “I rang up the customer service line to inquire about my order.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you ring-up the restaurant and make a reservation for us?”

30. Tele line

This term refers to the physical connection or wire that allows telephone calls to be made and received. “Tele line” is a colloquial term often used to refer to a telephone line or the infrastructure that enables telecommunication.

  • For example, “I need to install a new tele line in my office.”
  • A person might say, “The tele line got disconnected during the storm.”
  • Another might ask, “Is there a problem with the tele line? I can’t make any calls.”

31. Contact code

The term “contact code” is a slang term used to refer to a phone number. It is often used in casual conversations or when sharing phone numbers with friends.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey, can you give me your contact code?”
  • In a text message, a person might ask, “What’s your contact code? I need to add you to my contacts.”
  • When exchanging phone numbers, a person might say, “Here’s my contact code: 555-1234.”

32. Dial-up

The term “dial-up” is slang for an old-fashioned phone number that requires dialing on a rotary dial or keypad. It refers to the process of manually entering the digits to make a phone call.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had to use dial-up to call my grandma’s landline.”
  • In a nostalgic conversation, a person might reminisce, “I remember the days of dial-up when you had to wait for the rotary dial to spin back.”
  • When discussing the evolution of technology, someone might comment, “Kids these days will never understand the struggles of dial-up.”

33. Buzz code

The term “buzz code” refers to a coded phone number that is used to communicate a hidden or secret message. It is often used in situations where privacy or discretion is desired.

  • For example, someone might say, “I gave him my buzz code so he knows it’s me calling.”
  • In a spy-themed conversation, a person might mention, “Agents use buzz codes to relay information without arousing suspicion.”
  • When discussing secret communication methods, someone might say, “Buzz codes are a clever way to keep conversations private.”

34. Mobile line

The term “mobile line” is a slang term used to refer to a cell phone number. It emphasizes the mobility and portability of the phone number.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Can I have your mobile line? I’ll text you the details.”
  • In a discussion about contact information, a person might ask, “Do you prefer giving out your mobile line or your email address?”
  • When talking about the convenience of cell phones, someone might comment, “Having a mobile line means you can be reached anywhere, anytime.”

35. Tele buzz

The term “tele buzz” is a slang term used to refer to a telephone number. It combines the words “tele” (short for telephone) and “buzz” to create a catchy and informal way to talk about phone numbers.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll give you my tele buzz so you can reach me.”
  • In a conversation about communication methods, a person might mention, “Back in the day, people relied on tele buzzes to stay connected.”
  • When discussing the importance of having a contact list, someone might say, “Make sure to save important tele buzzes in your phone.”

36. Contact digits

Contact digits refers to the numbers that can be used to reach someone via phone. It is a slang term used to refer to a phone number.

  • For example, someone might say, “Give me your contact digits so I can reach you.”
  • In a conversation about exchanging information, one person might ask, “Can you share your contact digits with me?”
  • A person might receive a message saying, “I lost my phone, can you send me your contact digits?”

37. Hotline

A hotline is a direct phone line that is often used for specific purposes such as emergency assistance or providing information.

  • For instance, a suicide hotline is a phone service that offers support and counseling to individuals in crisis.
  • In a discussion about customer service, someone might mention, “You can reach our support team through our hotline.”
  • A person might say, “If you need immediate help, call the hotline.”

38. Blower

Blower is a slang term used to refer to a phone. It is derived from the action of blowing into the microphone of old telephones to make a call.

  • For example, someone might ask, “Can I borrow your blower to make a quick call?”
  • In a conversation about communication devices, one person might say, “I prefer using a blower instead of a smartphone.”
  • A person might receive a message saying, “I’ll give you a call on your blower later.”

39. Tele

Tele is a shortened form of the word “telephone” and is used as a slang term for a phone.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you a ring on the tele.”
  • In a discussion about communication methods, one person might mention, “I still prefer using a tele over texting.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a tele I can use to make a call?”

40. Buzzline

Buzzline is a slang term used to refer to a phone number. It implies that calling the number will result in a buzzing or ringing sound.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll give you my buzzline so you can reach me.”
  • In a conversation about sharing contact information, one person might ask, “Can you give me your buzzline?”
  • A person might receive a message saying, “I lost my phone, can you buzzline me instead?”

41. Buzz digits

This term refers to a phone number that can be used to reach someone. “Buzz digits” implies that the number can be used to contact someone by buzzing or calling them.

  • For example, “Hey, can I get your buzz digits? I want to give you a call.”
  • In a conversation about exchanging contact information, someone might say, “Just give me your buzz digits and I’ll add you to my contacts.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have his buzz digits? I need to reach him urgently.”

42. Ring contact

This term refers to a phone number that can be used to contact someone. “Ring contact” implies that the number can be used to make the person’s phone ring.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you my ring contact so you can reach me anytime.”
  • In a discussion about saving phone numbers, someone might say, “Make sure you save her ring contact so you don’t forget.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you share your ring contact? I need to get in touch with you.”

43. Call contact

This term refers to a phone number that can be used to call someone. “Call contact” implies that the number is used specifically for making phone calls.

  • For example, “I’ll give you my call contact so you can reach me directly.”
  • In a conversation about contacting someone, a person might say, “Just use my call contact if you need to get in touch.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you provide your call contact? I need to talk to you about something important.”

44. Buzzline digits

This term refers to a phone number that can be used to reach someone. “Buzzline digits” implies that the number is used specifically for buzzing or calling someone.

  • For instance, “Give me your buzzline digits so I can reach you later.”
  • In a discussion about phone numbers, someone might say, “I’ll add your buzzline digits to my contacts.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have her buzzline digits? I need to give her a call.”

45. Ring-up digits

This term refers to a phone number that can be used to make someone’s phone ring. “Ring-up digits” implies that the number is used specifically for making the person’s phone ring.

  • For example, “I’ll give you my ring-up digits so you can reach me whenever you want.”
  • In a conversation about exchanging contact information, someone might say, “Just save his ring-up digits in your phone.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you share your ring-up digits? I need to contact you urgently.”

46. Blower digits

This term refers to a phone number, specifically the digits that are used to make a call. “Blower” is slang for a telephone, and “digits” refers to the individual numbers that make up a phone number.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey, can you give me your blower digits?”
  • In a conversation about contacting someone, one person might ask, “Do you have his blower digits?”
  • A person might mention, “I lost my phone and all my blower digits are gone.”

47. Call

This term is used to refer to a phone number. It is a simple and straightforward way to talk about the digits needed to make a phone call.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you a call later. What’s your call?”
  • In a conversation about sharing contact information, one person might ask, “Can you give me your call?”
  • A person might mention, “I have a new phone, so I need to update all my calls.”

48. Num

This term is a shortened version of the word “number” and is used to refer to a phone number. It is commonly used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For example, someone might ask, “Can you give me your num?”
  • In a discussion about exchanging contact information, one person might say, “Just give me your num and I’ll text you.”
  • A person might mention, “I lost my phone, so I don’t have anyone’s nums anymore.”

49. Jingle

This term is used to refer to a phone number. It is a playful and catchy way to talk about the digits needed to make a phone call.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey, can you give me your jingle?”
  • In a conversation about sharing contact information, one person might ask, “What’s your jingle?”
  • A person might mention, “I have a new phone, so I need to update all my jingles.”

50. Ringtone

This term is used to refer to a phone number. It plays on the similarity between a phone’s ringtone and the digits needed to make a call.

  • For example, someone might say, “Can you give me your ringtone?”
  • In a discussion about contacting someone, one person might ask, “What’s your ringtone?”
  • A person might mention, “I lost my phone, so I don’t have any of my old ringtones.”

51. Chime

Refers to the numbers that make up a phone number. It can also be used to describe the act of dialing or entering a phone number.

  • For example, “Can you give me your chime so I can call you later?”
  • A person might say, “I need to chime my friend to let them know I’m running late.”
  • In a conversation about phone numbers, someone might ask, “How many chimes are in your phone number?”

52. Beep

A beep can refer to a phone number, especially when it is being dialed or entered on a keypad. It can also be used as a verb to describe the act of calling someone on the phone.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a beep later to discuss the details.”
  • A person might say, “I beeped my friend to let them know I arrived.”
  • In a discussion about phone numbers, someone might ask, “Can you give me your beep so I can add you to my contacts?”

53. Buzzword

A buzzword can refer to a phone number, particularly when it is being shared or mentioned in conversation. It can also be used to describe a trendy or popular phone number.

  • For example, “What’s the buzzword for that new restaurant?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll text you the buzzword so you can reach me.”
  • In a conversation about phone numbers, someone might ask, “Do you have the buzzword for the local taxi service?”

54. Talkie

Talkie is a slang term for a phone number, often used to refer to a specific phone line or extension.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you my talkie so you can reach me directly.”
  • A person might say, “I need to call the talkie at the office to discuss the project.”
  • In a discussion about phone numbers, someone might ask, “What’s the talkie for the customer service department?”

55. Telephony

Telephony refers to the technology and systems used for telephone communication. It can also be used to describe a phone number or the act of making a phone call.

  • For example, “I’ll give you my telephony so we can chat.”
  • A person might say, “I need to telephony my doctor to schedule an appointment.”
  • In a conversation about phone numbers, someone might ask, “What’s your telephony? I’ll add you to my contacts.”

56. Phonie

This term refers to a phone number that is not genuine or is intentionally given out to deceive someone. It can also be used to describe a phone number that is no longer in service.

  • For instance, if someone asks for your number and you give them a phonie, it means you are not interested in further contact.
  • In a prank call, a person might give a phonie as a joke.
  • Someone might say, “I tried calling that number, but it turned out to be a phonie.”

57. Ringback

This term refers to the sound or music that a caller hears while waiting for the person they called to answer. It is also known as a ringback tone or caller tone.

  • For example, when you call someone and hear a song playing instead of a traditional ringing sound, that’s a ringback.
  • A person might say, “I love the ringback on my friend’s phone. It’s always a catchy tune.”
  • Another might ask, “How do I change my ringback to a different song?”

58. Dial tone

This term refers to the audible tone or signal that a telephone system provides to indicate that it is ready to receive dialing instructions. It is a continuous sound that is heard when the phone is off the hook and ready to make a call.

  • For instance, if you pick up the phone and hear a dial tone, it means you can start dialing the number.
  • In a discussion about phone service, someone might say, “I called customer support, but all I got was a dial tone.”
  • A person might ask, “What should I do if there’s no dial tone on my phone?”
See also  Top 64 Slang For So – Meaning & Usage