Top 106 Slang For Points-Out – Meaning & Usage

Have you ever been in a conversation where someone points out something obvious or states the obvious? It can be both funny and frustrating at the same time. Well, we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang phrases for pointing out the obvious. From the classic “Captain Obvious” to the clever “stating the obvious like a weatherman,” this list will have you laughing and nodding your head in agreement. So, let’s dive in and discover the perfect phrases to use when someone just can’t help but state the obvious!

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1. Highlight

To draw attention to or give special importance to something. “Highlight” is often used to indicate that something is significant or worthy of notice.

  • For example, a user might say, “Let’s highlight the key points of this article.”
  • In a discussion about a game, someone might comment, “The graphics in this game really highlight the attention to detail.”
  • A person might respond to a compliment with, “Thank you! That really highlights my hard work.”

2. Flag

To mark or bring attention to something, often to indicate an issue or problem. “Flag” is commonly used to indicate that something should be noticed or addressed.

  • For instance, a user might say, “We need to flag this comment for inappropriate content.”
  • In a discussion about a software bug, someone might say, “I flagged this issue with the development team.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Be careful with that website, it’s been flagged for malware.”

3. Spotlight

To put a particular person or thing in the spotlight or focus attention on them. “Spotlight” is often used to indicate that someone or something deserves recognition or special attention.

  • For example, a user might say, “Let’s spotlight this talented artist and their amazing work.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might comment, “The company is really spotlighting the innovative features.”
  • A person might share a personal accomplishment by saying, “I’m excited to be in the spotlight for my achievements.”

4. Pinpoint

To determine or locate something with precision or accuracy. “Pinpoint” is commonly used to indicate that something is being identified or located exactly.

  • For instance, a user might say, “Can you pinpoint the exact location on the map?”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might comment, “We need to pinpoint the root cause of the issue.”
  • A person might describe a skill by saying, “I have the ability to pinpoint the smallest details.”

5. Call out

To publicly point out or criticize someone’s behavior or actions. “Call out” is often used when someone wants to draw attention to something negative or unacceptable.

  • For example, a user might say, “I have to call out this company for their unethical practices.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might comment, “We need to call out politicians who are not serving the people.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “I can’t believe I have to call out my own family for their hurtful comments.”

6. Bring to the forefront

This phrase means to emphasize or give special attention to something, bringing it to the forefront of a discussion or situation.

  • For example, during a meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s bring this issue to the forefront and address it right away.”
  • In a news article, the author might write, “The recent scandal has brought the issue of corruption to the forefront of public consciousness.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “Your excellent performance has brought your talent to the forefront of the class.”

7. Zero in on

To “zero in on” something means to concentrate or focus specifically on that thing.

  • For instance, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let’s zero in on the most important points.”
  • In a detective novel, the protagonist might say, “I need to zero in on the suspect and gather more evidence.”
  • During a brainstorming session, a team member might suggest, “Let’s zero in on this idea and explore it further.”

8. Point up

This phrase means to draw attention to or emphasize something, often to make it more noticeable or significant.

  • For example, a manager might say, “The recent decline in sales points up the need for a new marketing strategy.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might say, “These statistics point up the flaws in our current economic system.”
  • A teacher might write on a student’s paper, “This paragraph points up the main theme of your essay.”

9. Draw attention to

This phrase means to focus on or bring notice to something, often to make it more prominent or significant.

  • For instance, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “I would like to draw attention to the key findings of our research.”
  • In a newspaper article, the headline might read, “New study draws attention to the impact of climate change.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I want to draw your attention to the importance of good manners.”

10. Single out

To “single out” something means to choose or identify it specifically from a group or larger set.

  • For example, a coach might say, “I want to single out John for his outstanding performance in today’s game.”
  • In a classroom discussion, a student might say, “I would like to single out this passage from the text as particularly significant.”
  • During a staff meeting, a manager might say, “We need to single out the areas of improvement in our customer service.”

11. Pick out

To select or identify something or someone from a group or crowd. “Pick out” implies making a deliberate choice or selection.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please pick out a partner for this activity.”
  • In a clothing store, a salesperson might ask, “Can I help you pick out a new outfit?”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Pick out a toy to take with you.”

12. Point out

To draw attention to or indicate something or someone. “Point out” often involves directing someone’s gaze or focus towards a specific object or detail.

  • For instance, a tour guide might say, “Now, if you look to your left, I’d like to point out the historical landmark.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might say, “I’d like to point out an important fact.”
  • A friend might say, “Let me point out the best view from this lookout point.”

13. Signal

To communicate or convey a message or meaning. “Signal” can refer to both verbal and nonverbal cues that convey information or instructions.

  • For example, a driver might use their turn signal to signal their intention to change lanes.
  • In a meeting, a participant might use hand signals to signal agreement or disagreement.
  • A teacher might use a hand signal to signal students to be quiet.

14. Specify

To provide detailed information or instructions about something. “Specify” involves clearly defining or stating specific details or requirements.

  • For instance, a client might say, “Please specify the color and size of the product I ordered.”
  • In a recipe, it might say, “Specify whether to use salted or unsalted butter.”
  • A teacher might say, “Make sure to specify your sources when citing information.”

15. Stress

To place importance or significance on something. “Stress” involves highlighting or giving special attention to a particular point or aspect.

  • For example, a coach might say, “I cannot stress enough the importance of teamwork.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I want to stress my ability to work under pressure.”
  • A teacher might stress the importance of studying for a test.

16. Underline

To draw attention to or highlight something, often by using an underline. This term is commonly used when referring to written or digital content.

  • For example, in a document review, a person might say, “Let’s underline the key points in this paragraph.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might instruct the audience, “Please pay attention to the underlined words on the slide.”
  • When editing a blog post, a writer might suggest, “We should underline the important information to make it stand out.”

17. Call attention to

To direct someone’s attention towards a specific thing or topic. This phrase is often used to indicate the act of highlighting or pointing out something noteworthy.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Let’s call attention to the main theme of this book.”
  • In a meeting, a participant might suggest, “We should call attention to the recent changes in the market.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, a person might argue, “It’s important to call attention to the underlying issues and address them.”

18. Focus on

To concentrate or give special attention to a particular aspect or detail. This phrase is commonly used to indicate the act of directing one’s attention or highlighting a specific point.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Let’s focus on improving our defense in the next practice.”
  • In a brainstorming session, a team member might suggest, “We should focus on the target audience’s needs and preferences.”
  • When giving feedback on a project, a supervisor might advise, “You need to focus on the key objectives and deliverables.”

19. Highlighter

A writing tool used to draw attention to or emphasize specific text or content. Highlighters are often fluorescent or brightly colored, making it easy to visually distinguish the highlighted information.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to use a highlighter to mark the important details in my textbook.”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask, “Does anyone have a highlighter? I want to mark the key points in this document.”
  • When studying, a person might comment, “Using different colors of highlighters helps me organize and remember the information better.”

20. Noteworthy

Describing something that is deserving of attention or recognition due to its significance or importance. This term is often used to highlight something notable.

  • For example, a journalist might write, “The politician’s speech contained several noteworthy quotes.”
  • In a review, a critic might state, “The movie’s cinematography is particularly noteworthy.”
  • When discussing achievements, a person might say, “His contributions to the field of science are truly noteworthy.”

21. Pin down

This slang phrase means to identify or specify something or someone. It is often used when trying to clarify or make something clear.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s pin down the exact date for the event.”
  • When discussing a problem, someone might ask, “Can you pin down the source of the issue?”
  • In a conversation about a suspect, a detective might say, “We need to pin down his whereabouts during the time of the crime.”

22. Point to

This slang phrase means to indicate or suggest something. It is often used when trying to draw attention to a particular idea or possibility.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a crime, someone might say, “All the evidence points to the suspect.”
  • When analyzing data, someone might point to a specific trend and say, “This data point points to a potential problem.”
  • In a debate, someone might point to a historical event and argue, “This example points to the potential consequences of our actions.”

23. Spotlight on

This slang phrase means to highlight or focus on something or someone. It is often used when drawing attention to a particular subject or individual.

  • For example, in a presentation, someone might say, “Now, let’s shine the spotlight on this important issue.”
  • When discussing a celebrity, someone might say, “The media constantly puts the spotlight on their personal life.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might suggest, “We need to put the spotlight on finding a solution.”

24. Take notice of

This slang phrase means to pay attention to something or someone. It is often used when emphasizing the importance of being aware or observant.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “I hope everyone takes notice of the new policy.”
  • When discussing a subtle detail, someone might say, “Take notice of the hidden message in this painting.”
  • In a conversation about a talented individual, someone might say, “You can’t help but take notice of their skills.”

25. Bring to light

This slang phrase means to reveal or expose something. It is often used when uncovering hidden information or bringing attention to a previously unknown fact.

  • For example, in a news article, the headline might read, “New evidence brings to light the truth about the scandal.”
  • When discussing a historical event, someone might say, “This documentary brings to light the untold stories of the people involved.”
  • In a conversation about a problem, someone might suggest, “We need to bring this issue to light and find a solution.”

26. Flag up

To “flag up” something means to bring attention to it or highlight it. It is often used to indicate that there is an important or noteworthy issue that needs to be addressed.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “I just want to flag up the fact that we are running behind schedule.”
  • In an email, a person might write, “I wanted to flag up the error in the report.”
  • A supervisor might tell their team, “If you notice any issues, please flag them up to me immediately.”

27. Bring up

To “bring up” something means to introduce or mention it in a conversation or discussion. It is often used when someone wants to talk about a specific topic or point.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “I would like to bring up a new idea for our marketing strategy.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might bring up a recent news article they read.
  • During a debate, a participant might bring up a relevant statistic to support their argument.
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28. Note

To “note” something means to take notice of it or mention it briefly. It is often used to acknowledge or highlight a specific point or piece of information.

  • For example, in a presentation, a speaker might say, “Please note that these figures are subject to change.”
  • In an email, a person might write, “Just a quick note to remind everyone about the upcoming deadline.”
  • A teacher might note a student’s improvement by saying, “I want to note the progress you have made in this subject.”

29. Identify

To “identify” something means to recognize or establish its identity. It is often used when someone wants to specify or determine the nature or characteristics of something.

  • For instance, in a crime investigation, a detective might say, “We need to identify the suspect based on the available evidence.”
  • In a research study, a scientist might identify the key variables that will be analyzed.
  • During a game, a player might identify the strengths and weaknesses of their opponent.

30. Mark

To “mark” something means to highlight or indicate it. It is often used to draw attention to a specific point or to indicate its significance.

  • For example, in a document, a person might mark a paragraph as important by highlighting it.
  • In a presentation, a speaker might mark key points with bullet points or visual aids.
  • A teacher might mark a student’s paper to indicate areas that need improvement.

31. Direct attention to

This phrase means to bring someone’s focus or attention to something specific. It is often used to point out important information or draw someone’s attention to a particular detail.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Direct attention to the diagram on the board.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s direct attention to the sales figures for this quarter.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Direct attention to the player with the ball and defend accordingly.”

32. Draw focus to

This phrase means to redirect someone’s attention or bring their focus to a particular subject or object. It is commonly used to emphasize a specific point or highlight an important detail.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “Let’s draw focus to the key findings of our research.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I want to draw focus to the impact this decision will have on our team.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in an article, “The author draws focus to the theme of identity throughout the novel.”

33. Outline

This word means to provide a brief summary or overview of something. It is often used to give a general idea or highlight the main points of a topic or concept.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “Let me outline the main steps of our project.”
  • In a report, someone might write, “The following section will outline the key findings of our research.”
  • A teacher might ask their students to outline the main events of a historical period.

34. Emphasize

This word means to give special importance or attention to something. It is used to make a point or draw attention to a particular aspect or detail.

  • For instance, a speaker might say, “I want to emphasize the importance of teamwork in this organization.”
  • In an essay, a writer might state, “The author emphasizes the theme of love throughout the novel.”
  • A coach might emphasize the importance of practice to their team, saying, “To succeed, we need to emphasize the value of consistent practice.”

35. Underscore

This word means to emphasize or give added importance to something. It is often used to draw attention to a specific point or to emphasize the significance of a particular detail.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “This data underscores the need for immediate action.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I want to underscore the impact this decision will have on our team.”
  • A writer might use this word in an article, “The author underscores the importance of friendship in the novel.”

36. Accentuate

To emphasize or draw attention to something. “Accentuate” is often used to describe the act of making something more noticeable or prominent.

  • For example, a fashion magazine might say, “Wearing a belt can accentuate your waist.”
  • In a discussion about interior design, someone might suggest, “Using bold colors can accentuate the room’s focal point.”
  • A person might use the word to describe a speaker who is trying to emphasize a point, saying, “She really knows how to accentuate her arguments.”

37. Feature

To prominently display or present something. In the context of “feature,” it often refers to highlighting a specific aspect or characteristic.

  • For instance, a technology review might say, “The new smartphone features a high-resolution screen.”
  • In a magazine article about a celebrity, a writer might mention, “The interview will feature exclusive photos of the star.”
  • A person might use the word to describe a restaurant that specializes in a particular cuisine, saying, “The menu features authentic Italian dishes.”

38. Bring out

To draw attention to or emphasize something. “Bring out” is often used to describe the act of making something more noticeable or prominent.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “The assignment is designed to bring out your creativity.”
  • In a discussion about a musician’s talent, someone might comment, “Her latest album really brings out her vocal range.”
  • A person might use the phrase to describe a speaker who is trying to emphasize a point, saying, “He knows how to bring out the best in his arguments.”

39. Raise awareness of

To increase knowledge or understanding about a particular issue or topic. “Raise awareness of” is often used to describe the act of bringing attention to a cause or problem.

  • For instance, a nonprofit organization might say, “Our goal is to raise awareness of climate change.”
  • In a social media campaign, someone might post, “Help us raise awareness of mental health by sharing your story.”
  • A person might use the phrase to describe an event aimed at educating the public, saying, “The workshop will raise awareness of the importance of recycling.”

40. Make clear

To explain or make something easier to understand. “Make clear” is often used to describe the act of removing confusion or ambiguity.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me make clear what the assignment requirements are.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might ask, “Can you make it clear how these two concepts are related?”
  • A person might use the phrase to describe a presenter who is ensuring understanding, saying, “The speaker used visuals to make the information clear.”

41. Illustrate

To illustrate something means to explain or clarify it using visual aids or examples.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me illustrate this concept with a diagram.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might use a graph to illustrate a trend or pattern.
  • A writer might include a photograph to illustrate a point in an article.

42. Elucidate

To elucidate means to make something clear or explain it in a way that is easy to understand.

  • For instance, a professor might say, “Allow me to elucidate the main points of this theory.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you elucidate what you mean by that?”
  • A writer might use an analogy to elucidate a complex concept.

43. Expound

To expound means to explain or discuss something in great detail or at length.

  • For example, a lecturer might say, “I will now expound upon the various theories surrounding this topic.”
  • In a debate, someone might expound on their argument by providing supporting evidence.
  • A writer might expound on a specific point in an essay to provide further clarity.

44. Clarify

To clarify means to make something clear or remove any confusion or ambiguity.

  • For instance, a speaker might say, “Allow me to clarify my previous statement.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you clarify what you mean by that?”
  • A writer might include a footnote to clarify a specific term or concept.

45. Reveal

To reveal means to make something known or disclose it to others.

  • For example, a detective might say, “The evidence revealed the identity of the suspect.”
  • In a surprise announcement, someone might reveal a secret to their friends.
  • A journalist might reveal new information in an investigative report.

46. Expose

To make something known or visible that was previously hidden or secret. “Expose” can refer to revealing the truth about something or bringing something to light.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I plan to expose the corruption within the government.”
  • In a scandal, someone might say, “The leaked documents will expose the truth.”
  • A whistleblower might come forward and say, “I want to expose the illegal activities happening at my workplace.”

47. Uncover

To reveal or bring to light something that was previously hidden or unknown. “Uncover” can refer to finding information or revealing the truth about something.

  • For instance, an archaeologist might say, “We hope to uncover ancient artifacts at this excavation site.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I need to uncover the identity of the killer.”
  • A journalist might investigate and say, “I want to uncover the truth behind this scandal.”

48. Unveil

To make something known or visible for the first time. “Unveil” often refers to the official introduction or presentation of something new or significant.

  • For example, a company might unveil a new product at a press conference.
  • In the world of fashion, a designer might unveil their latest collection on the runway.
  • A politician might unveil a new policy or initiative during a public speech.

49. Disclose

To make something known or provide information that was previously unknown or secret. “Disclose” often refers to sharing information or details that were previously withheld.

  • For instance, a company might disclose financial information in their annual report.
  • In a legal context, a witness might disclose important evidence during a trial.
  • A government official might disclose classified information to the public.

50. Indicate

To point out or suggest something. “Indicate” often refers to providing evidence or signs that can be interpreted as pointing towards a particular conclusion.

  • For example, a red traffic light indicates that drivers should stop.
  • In a scientific study, certain symptoms might indicate a specific medical condition.
  • A weather forecast might indicate that rain is likely in the afternoon.

51. Draw attention

To bring something to the forefront or make it noticeable. “Draw attention” is a phrase used to describe the act of making something stand out or become more visible.

  • For example, in a crowded room, someone might say, “I need to draw attention to our guest speaker.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might use visual aids to draw attention to important information.
  • A headline in a newspaper might read, “New study draws attention to the dangers of smoking.”

52. Call to mind

To bring something to one’s attention or to remember something. “Call to mind” is a phrase used to describe the act of bringing a memory or thought back to one’s consciousness.

  • For instance, a smell might call to mind a childhood memory.
  • Seeing an old photograph might call to mind a specific moment in time.
  • A certain song might call to mind a particular event or feeling.

53. Remind

To cause someone to remember something or to bring a memory back to one’s consciousness. “Remind” is a verb used to describe the act of prompting or triggering a memory.

  • For example, a calendar notification might remind someone of an upcoming appointment.
  • A familiar scent might remind someone of a person or place from their past.
  • A photograph might remind someone of a happy moment or time in their life.

54. Prompt

To encourage or cause someone to take action or remember something. “Prompt” is a verb used to describe the act of urging or inciting someone to do or think something.

  • For instance, a teacher might prompt a student to answer a question in class.
  • A reminder notification might prompt someone to complete a task.
  • A thought or idea might prompt someone to take a certain course of action.
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55. Evoke

To bring a feeling, memory, or image to mind. “Evoke” is a verb used to describe the act of bringing something to the surface or eliciting a response.

  • For example, a piece of music might evoke strong emotions in the listener.
  • A painting might evoke a specific time period or cultural reference.
  • A certain smell might evoke memories of a particular place or person.

56. Invoke

To invoke means to call upon or summon something, often in a ritualistic or formal manner. In the context of points-out, it refers to citing a specific reference or example to support an argument or point.

  • For example, a debater might say, “I invoke the words of the founding fathers to support my position on this issue.”
  • In a legal setting, a lawyer might invoke a precedent to strengthen their case.
  • An author might invoke a famous quote to emphasize a theme in their writing.

57. Summon

To summon means to bring forth or call upon someone or something, often with authority or power. In points-out slang, it refers to bringing forth evidence or examples to support a claim or argument.

  • For instance, a researcher might say, “I summon the data from our latest study to prove my hypothesis.”
  • In a debate, someone might summon historical events to illustrate the potential consequences of a policy.
  • A journalist might summon eyewitness testimonies to corroborate their report.

58. Cite

To cite means to refer to or mention something as evidence or support for a statement or argument. In the context of points-out slang, it means to provide a specific reference or example to back up a claim.

  • For example, a student might say, “I cite multiple sources to support my research paper.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific discovery, someone might cite a published study to validate their point.
  • A journalist might cite statistics to provide credibility to their news article.

59. Allude to

To allude to means to hint at or indirectly reference something. In points-out slang, it refers to subtly mentioning or implying a particular reference or example without explicitly stating it.

  • For instance, a speaker might say, “I allude to a famous historical event that illustrates the dangers of unchecked power.”
  • In a literary analysis, a critic might argue that the author alludes to a well-known myth to add depth to the story.
  • A comedian might allude to a popular meme to create a humorous connection with the audience.

60. Suggest

To suggest means to imply or indicate something indirectly. In points-out slang, it refers to implying or indicating a specific reference or example to support a claim or argument.

  • For example, a speaker might say, “The data suggests a correlation between these two variables.”
  • In a persuasive essay, a writer might suggest that historical patterns can inform future decision-making.
  • A scientist might suggest a hypothesis based on preliminary observations.

61. Imply

When you imply something, you are suggesting or hinting at it without directly stating it. It often involves using indirect language or nonverbal cues.

  • For example, if someone says, “You look tired,” they might be implying that you don’t look well-rested.
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “I hope they don’t find out,” implying that there is a surprise planned.
  • A person might imply their disapproval by saying, “Some people have no manners.”

62. Insinuate

Insinuating involves subtly suggesting or hinting at something negative or derogatory. It often involves making indirect or veiled remarks.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’m sure you didn’t mean to be rude,” they might be insinuating that you were indeed rude.
  • In a discussion about a coworker’s promotion, someone might insinuate that the promotion was based on favoritism.
  • A person might insinuate their suspicions by saying, “I find it interesting how you conveniently had an alibi for that time.”

63. Intimate

When you intimate something, you are subtly suggesting or hinting at it, often through nonverbal cues or indirect language. It is similar to implying something.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think she’s seeing someone else,” they might be intimating that there is infidelity in the relationship.
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might intimate their knowledge of the surprise by saying, “I heard there’s something special planned for tomorrow.”
  • A person might intimate their discomfort by avoiding eye contact and crossing their arms.

64. Hint at

When you hint at something, you are subtly suggesting or implying it without directly stating it. It often involves using subtle clues or indirect language.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I could use some help with this,” they might be hinting at wanting assistance.
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might hint at their desire to travel by saying, “I’ve always wanted to see the world.”
  • A person might hint at their romantic interest by saying, “I really enjoy spending time with you.”

65. Gesture towards

When you gesture towards something, you are making a physical movement or signal to indicate or point out that thing. It involves using body language or hand movements.

  • For example, if someone gestures towards a book, they are indicating that they want you to look at or read it.
  • In a conversation about directions, someone might gesture towards a specific street to indicate where to turn.
  • A person might gesture towards a chair to invite someone to sit down.

66. Nod towards

This phrase is used to suggest or imply something without explicitly stating it. It can be used to subtly point out or reference something.

  • For example, in a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I’m not saying he’s wrong, but let’s just nod towards the other side of the argument.”
  • In a meeting, a colleague might mention, “We should nod towards the potential risks of this decision.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in an article, saying, “The author subtly nods towards the underlying theme of loneliness throughout the novel.”

67. Refer to

This phrase is used to direct attention to something or someone. It can be used to allude to a specific topic or point out a reference.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The title of the chapter seems to refer to the main character’s internal struggle.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might state, “When I refer to ‘the study,’ I’m talking about the research conducted by Dr. Smith.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “When answering the question, make sure to refer to the text for evidence.”

68. Point towards

This phrase is used to indicate or suggest a particular idea or conclusion. It can be used to direct attention towards a specific point or aspect.

  • For example, in a detective novel, a clue might “point towards” the identity of the culprit.
  • In a scientific study, the results might “point towards” a certain conclusion.
  • A friend might say, “All the evidence seems to point towards her being the one who took the last slice of pizza.”

69. Show

This word is used to demonstrate or reveal something. It can be used to present evidence or information to support a claim or idea.

  • For instance, in a presentation, a speaker might say, “This graph shows the correlation between income and education level.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the chef might show the viewers how to properly chop an onion.
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Can you show your work to explain how you arrived at the answer?”

70. Display

This word is used to exhibit or showcase something. It can be used to present information or visuals in a clear and visible manner.

  • For example, in a museum, artifacts are displayed to educate and engage visitors.
  • In a technology conference, companies might display their latest products for attendees to see.
  • A designer might display their portfolio to potential clients to showcase their skills and style.

71. Manifest

To manifest means to show or demonstrate something clearly. It is often used to describe the act of making something visible or evident.

  • For example, “She manifested her talent through her stunning artwork.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might say, “I want to manifest my dreams into reality.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Manifest your desires by visualizing your success.”

72. Exhibit

To exhibit means to display or show something publicly. It is often used to describe the act of presenting something for others to see or experience.

  • For instance, “The museum will exhibit rare artifacts from ancient civilizations.”
  • In a conversation about art, someone might say, “She will exhibit her paintings at the gallery next month.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Each student must exhibit their science project during the school fair.”

73. Present

To present means to showcase or display something to an audience. It is often used to describe the act of offering or introducing something for others to observe or experience.

  • For example, “The speaker will present their research findings at the conference.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might say, “The company will present their latest innovation to potential investors.”
  • A performer might announce, “I am excited to present my new song to the audience tonight.”

74. Express

To express means to convey or communicate something. It is often used to describe the act of articulating thoughts, feelings, or ideas.

  • For instance, “She expressed her gratitude through a heartfelt thank-you note.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, someone might say, “It’s important to express your feelings in a healthy way.”
  • A writer might advise, “Use metaphors and vivid language to express the depth of your emotions.”

75. Articulate

To articulate means to enunciate or pronounce words clearly and distinctly. It is often used to describe the act of expressing oneself clearly and effectively.

  • For example, “He articulated his thoughts in a well-structured argument.”
  • In a discussion about public speaking, someone might say, “It’s important to articulate your words to ensure your message is understood.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “Practice articulating your ideas to improve your communication skills.”

76. Voice

When someone “voices” something, they are expressing or bringing attention to a particular point or issue.

  • For example, a person might say, “I just wanted to voice my concern about the new policy.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s give everyone a chance to voice their opinions on this matter.”
  • A journalist might write, “The article voices the frustrations of the local community.”

77. Spot

When someone “spots” something, they are identifying or pointing out a particular thing or detail.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I spotted a mistake in the report.”
  • A detective might say, “I spotted a clue that could lead to the suspect.”
  • In a game, a player might shout, “I spotted the hidden item!”

78. Highlights

When something is “highlighted,” it means that it is being emphasized or drawing attention.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “These are the highlights of the event.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “Let’s take a look at the highlights from the match.”
  • A reviewer might write, “The film highlights the actor’s exceptional performance.”

79. Spotlights

When something is “spotlighted,” it means that attention is being focused on it.

  • For instance, a company might spotlight a new product in their marketing campaign.
  • During a performance, a spotlight might be used to highlight a specific actor or scene.
  • A journalist might write, “The article spotlights the issue of climate change.”

80. Pinpoints

When someone “pinpoints” something, they are precisely identifying or locating a particular thing or detail.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “We have pinpointed the exact location of the earthquake.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to pinpoint the time of the crime to establish an alibi.”
  • In a treasure hunt, a clue might say, “This clue will pinpoint the location of the hidden treasure.”

81. Calls attention to

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is highlighting or emphasizing a particular thing or issue.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me call attention to an important detail in this passage.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I want to call attention to the budget deficit we’re facing.”
  • A news anchor might say, “This report calls attention to the rising crime rates in the city.”

82. Draws focus to

When someone draws focus to something, they are intentionally shifting the attention of others towards a specific thing or topic.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “I want to draw your focus to this chart, which shows our company’s growth.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let’s draw focus to the main issue at hand.”
  • A photographer might say, “I’m going to use lighting to draw focus to the subject of this portrait.”

83. Shines a light on

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is bringing attention to or revealing something that was previously unnoticed or hidden.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “This investigative report shines a light on corruption within the government.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to shine a light on the systemic inequalities in our society.”
  • A researcher might say, “This study shines a light on the potential health risks of a certain medication.”

84. Flags up

When something is flagged up, it means that attention is being drawn to a particular issue or concern.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “I need to flag up some safety concerns in the workplace.”
  • In a report, someone might write, “This data flags up a potential problem in our sales department.”
  • A teacher might say, “I want to flag up the importance of completing your homework on time.”

85. Points up

To point up means to draw attention to or emphasize a specific point or aspect.

  • For example, a speaker might say, “Let me point up the key findings of our research.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I want to point up the flaws in your argument.”
  • A coach might say, “I need to point up the importance of teamwork in this sport.”

86. Raises awareness of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being brought to the attention of others in order to increase awareness or understanding. It implies that the subject may not have been previously noticed or understood.

  • For example, a social media post might say, “This article raises awareness of the importance of mental health.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I want to raises awareness of the issues our team is facing.”
  • A speaker might use this phrase to introduce a topic, saying, “I’m here to raises awareness of the impact of climate change.”

87. Brings to the forefront

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being brought to the forefront or made more prominent. It suggests that the subject was previously less noticeable or less important.

  • For instance, a news headline might read, “New study brings to the forefront the dangers of vaping.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I want to bring to the forefront the need for better education on this issue.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to introduce a key point, saying, “I’d like to bring to the forefront the impact of technology on our daily lives.”

88. Key takeaways

This phrase is used to indicate the most important or significant points to remember from a discussion or presentation. It suggests that these points are crucial for understanding or applying the information.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Before we end the class, let’s review the key takeaways.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Could you please summarize the key takeaways from the presentation?”
  • A conference speaker might provide a handout with the key takeaways for attendees to reference later.
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89. Key points

This phrase is used to indicate the most important or essential aspects of a topic or discussion. It suggests that these points are crucial for understanding or making decisions.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “Let’s focus on the key points of the proposal.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I’d like to address the key points raised by my opponent.”
  • A teacher might ask students to identify the key points from a reading assignment.

90. Main points

This phrase is used to indicate the primary or central ideas of a topic or discussion. It suggests that these points are the most significant or fundamental.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “Let’s go over the main points of the argument.”
  • In a lecture, a professor might say, “These are the main points you need to understand for the exam.”
  • A writer might structure an article around the main points to ensure clarity and organization.

91. Standouts

This term is used to refer to the specific parts or aspects of something that are particularly outstanding or remarkable.

  • For example, in a discussion about a basketball game, someone might say, “The standouts of the game were the incredible three-point shots.”
  • In a review of a movie, a critic might mention, “The standouts of the film were the stunning visual effects.”
  • A teacher might point out, “One of the standouts in this essay is the well-developed argument.”

92. Salient points

This phrase is used to highlight the key or significant points of a discussion, argument, or presentation.

  • For instance, in a political debate, someone might say, “Let me summarize the salient points of my opponent’s argument.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might emphasize, “These are the salient points that we need to focus on for our strategy.”
  • A student might ask, “Can you please clarify the salient points of the lecture?”

93. Key aspects

This term is used to identify the crucial or fundamental parts of something that contribute to its overall understanding or significance.

  • For example, in a book review, someone might discuss, “The key aspects of the novel are its complex characters and intricate plot.”
  • In a scientific study, a researcher might analyze, “These are the key aspects that explain the observed phenomenon.”
  • A coach might point out, “One of the key aspects of winning this game is strong teamwork.”

94. Major points

This phrase is used to highlight the main or major points of a discussion, argument, or presentation.

  • For instance, in a debate, someone might say, “Let me summarize the major points of my argument.”
  • In a lecture, a professor might emphasize, “These are the major points that you should remember for the exam.”
  • A speaker might ask, “Do you have any questions about the major points I just covered?”

95. Notable

This term is used to describe something or someone that is deserving of notice or acknowledgement due to its significance or exceptional qualities.

  • For example, in a music review, a critic might say, “The album has several notable tracks that showcase the artist’s versatility.”
  • In a sports competition, a commentator might highlight, “The player’s notable performance led the team to victory.”
  • A historian might discuss, “One of the notable figures in this period of history is known for their groundbreaking discoveries.”

96. Key elements

This term refers to the most important or crucial parts of something. It is often used to highlight the fundamental aspects or factors that contribute to a particular outcome or result.

  • For example, in a business presentation, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the key elements of our marketing strategy.”
  • In a scientific research paper, the author might state, “The key elements of our study include participant demographics and data analysis methods.”
  • A coach might emphasize, “The key elements of a successful team are communication, teamwork, and dedication.”

97. Key factors

This term is used to describe the significant or influential factors that contribute to a particular situation or outcome. It highlights the essential elements that play a crucial role in shaping a result.

  • For instance, a financial analyst might say, “The key factors affecting the stock market today are interest rates and global trade.”
  • In a sports analysis, a commentator might discuss, “The key factors in the team’s victory were strong defense and accurate passing.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The key factors for academic success include regular studying, active participation, and time management.”

98. Main highlights

This term refers to the most important or notable aspects or moments of something. It is used to draw attention to the significant or standout features that are worth focusing on or remembering.

  • For example, a book review might mention, “The main highlights of the novel are its intricate plot and well-developed characters.”
  • In a travel blog, the writer might describe, “The main highlights of my trip to Paris were visiting the Eiffel Tower and exploring the Louvre.”
  • A presenter might say, “Now let’s move on to the main highlights of our product demonstration.”

99. Key findings

This term refers to the most important or noteworthy conclusions or results obtained from a study, research, or investigation. It highlights the key discoveries or insights that contribute to the overall understanding of a particular subject.

  • For instance, a scientific report might state, “The key findings of our experiment indicate a positive correlation between exercise and mental well-being.”
  • In a market research presentation, the analyst might highlight, “The key findings suggest a growing demand for sustainable products among consumers.”
  • A journalist reporting on a study might summarize, “The key findings of the research reveal a potential link between sleep deprivation and cognitive decline.”

100. Main takeaways

This term refers to the most important or valuable insights or lessons gained from an experience, event, or information. It highlights the key points or key messages that individuals should remember or apply.

  • For example, a workshop facilitator might say, “Before we wrap up, let’s discuss the main takeaways from today’s session.”
  • In a conference presentation, a speaker might emphasize, “The main takeaways from our research are the need for increased collaboration and innovation.”
  • A mentor might advise, “The main takeaways from my years of experience are to prioritize self-care and maintain a growth mindset.”

101. Notable features

These are the distinct or remarkable aspects of something. “Notable features” refers to the specific elements that make something noteworthy or worthy of attention.

  • For example, a review of a new smartphone might mention, “One of the notable features of this phone is its high-resolution display.”
  • In a discussion about a painting, someone might point out, “The artist’s use of vibrant colors is one of the notable features of this artwork.”
  • A tour guide might say, “As we explore this historic building, I’ll point out some of its notable features.”

102. Key observations

These are the significant or crucial observations made about a particular subject. “Key observations” refers to the main points or important details that are noticed or recognized.

  • For instance, in a scientific study, the researcher might state, “Based on our key observations, we can conclude that the hypothesis is accurate.”
  • In a discussion about a film, someone might share, “One of my key observations about this movie is the excellent cinematography.”
  • A journalist might write, “After extensive research, I have made several key observations about the current political climate.”

103. Main features

These are the most important or prominent aspects of something. “Main features” refers to the key elements or primary characteristics that define or distinguish something.

  • For example, in a product description, the seller might highlight, “The main features of this laptop include a powerful processor and a high-resolution display.”
  • When discussing a car, someone might say, “One of the main features of this model is its fuel efficiency.”
  • A travel brochure might list, “The main features of this destination are its beautiful beaches and vibrant nightlife.”

104. Noteworthy details

These are the significant or remarkable specifics or particulars about something. “Noteworthy details” refers to the specific information or details that stand out or are worthy of attention.

  • For instance, in a book review, the reviewer might mention, “The author’s attention to noteworthy details brings the story to life.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might point out, “One of the noteworthy details is the involvement of a key figure.”
  • A teacher might say, “Pay close attention to the noteworthy details in this passage, as they will be important for the quiz.”

105. Key conclusions

These are the significant or crucial conclusions or results drawn from a particular study or analysis. “Key conclusions” refers to the main points or important findings that are reached or determined.

  • For example, in a scientific research paper, the author might state, “Based on our key conclusions, we can recommend a new treatment for this disease.”
  • In a business report, someone might highlight, “One of the key conclusions of our analysis is the need for cost-cutting measures.”
  • A student might say, “After analyzing the data, I have drawn several key conclusions about the experiment.”

106. Main conclusions

This refers to the main points or findings of a discussion, presentation, or report. It highlights the most important information that summarizes the overall content.

  • For example, in a scientific research paper, the main conclusions might be stated as “The study found that X and Y are strongly correlated.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s go over the main conclusions from the market analysis.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Can anyone share the main conclusions from the assigned reading?”