Top 57 Slang For Poison – Meaning & Usage

Looking for a list of slang terms for poison? Look no further! We’ve gathered a collection of the most intriguing and lesser-known words used to describe this lethal substance. From old-school classics to modern twists, we’ve got you covered. Stay tuned to uncover the hidden language of poison and impress your friends with your newfound knowledge!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Juice

In slang terms, “juice” refers to a toxic substance or poison. It is often used metaphorically to describe something harmful or dangerous.

  • For example, a person might say, “Be careful, that guy’s got some bad juice.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous chemicals, someone might mention, “That chemical is pure juice, handle with caution.”
  • Another might warn, “Stay away from that drink, it’s spiked with juice.”

2. Venom

Venom is a slang term for a toxic fluid produced by certain animals, such as snakes or spiders, that is injected into a victim through a bite or sting. It is also used metaphorically to describe something harmful or poisonous.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Watch out for that snake, its venom can kill you.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous insects, a person might mention, “The venom of a black widow spider is highly toxic.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t mess with that person, they have a venomous tongue.”

3. Tox

Tox is a slang abbreviation for “toxic” or “poisonous.” It is often used in online gaming communities or in casual conversations to describe something harmful or dangerous.

  • For example, a gamer might say, “That player’s strategy is toxic, they’re always ruining the game for others.”
  • In a discussion about harmful substances, someone might mention, “That chemical is tox, don’t let it come in contact with your skin.”
  • Another might warn, “Stay away from that neighborhood, it’s known for its tox atmosphere.”

4. Bad medicine

In slang terms, “bad medicine” refers to a harmful substance or poison. It is often used metaphorically to describe something or someone that is detrimental or toxic.

  • For instance, someone might say, “That guy is bad medicine, he’ll only bring trouble.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous drugs, a person might mention, “Stay away from that pill, it’s bad medicine.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t trust that person, they’re like bad medicine for your mental health.”

5. Death juice

Death juice is a slang term for a lethal liquid, often referring to a poisonous substance. It is used metaphorically to describe something extremely dangerous or deadly.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t touch that bottle, it’s filled with death juice.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous chemicals, a person might mention, “The death juice in that lab is highly potent.”
  • Another might warn, “Stay away from that plant, its sap is like death juice.”

6. Lethal dose

This term refers to the amount of a substance that is capable of causing death. It is often used to describe the quantity of a toxic substance that is fatal to humans or animals.

  • For example, in a crime investigation, a detective might say, “The victim ingested a lethal dose of poison.”
  • A medical professional might discuss the effects of a drug by stating, “Even a small increase in dosage can turn a safe medication into a lethal dose.”
  • In a discussion about drug overdoses, someone might mention, “It’s important to be aware of the lethal dose of opioids to prevent accidental deaths.”

7. Malevolent mixture

This term refers to a concoction or blend of substances that is intentionally harmful or dangerous. It implies that the mixture has malicious or evil intentions.

  • For instance, in a mystery novel, a character might discover a bottle labeled “malevolent mixture” in the antagonist’s lair.
  • A chemist discussing dangerous chemicals might refer to a volatile combination as a “malevolent mixture.”
  • In a cautionary article about household cleaning products, someone might warn against mixing certain chemicals, saying, “Be careful not to create a malevolent mixture that could release toxic fumes.”

8. Sinister substance

This term describes a substance that is considered harmful, dangerous, or capable of causing harm. It suggests that the substance has a dark or evil nature.

  • For example, in a crime investigation, a detective might refer to a suspicious powder as a “sinister substance.”
  • A journalist reporting on a toxic spill might describe the leaked chemicals as a “sinister substance.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, someone might mention, “We need to address the issue of sinister substances contaminating our water sources.”

9. Toxic tonic

This term refers to a liquid or potion that contains toxic or poisonous substances. It suggests that the tonic is intended to cause harm or illness.

  • For instance, in a murder mystery, a character might discover a bottle labeled “toxic tonic” in the suspect’s possession.
  • A health expert discussing the dangers of certain beverages might warn against consuming toxic tonics.
  • In a discussion about historical poisons, someone might mention, “Toxic tonics were once used as deadly weapons in assassinations.”

10. Vile venom

This term combines the ideas of something being both repugnant and poisonous. It suggests a venomous substance that is highly unpleasant or revolting.

  • For example, in a fantasy novel, a character might encounter a creature with vile venom that causes excruciating pain.
  • A herpetologist studying venomous snakes might refer to a particularly potent snake’s venom as vile venom.
  • In a discussion about dangerous animals, someone might mention, “The bite of a funnel-web spider contains a vile venom that can be deadly.”

11. Deadly concoction

This term refers to a dangerous combination of substances that can cause harm or even death when consumed. It is often used to describe a poisonous drink or substance that has been created intentionally.

  • For example, a detective might say, “The victim was killed by a deadly concoction of drugs and alcohol.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might warn, “Be careful, that drink is a deadly concoction.”
  • A bartender might say, “I don’t recommend mixing those two ingredients, it could create a deadly concoction.”

12. Hazardous brew

This term refers to a dangerous mixture or combination of substances that can be harmful or toxic when consumed. It is often used to describe a poisonous drink or substance that has been created unintentionally.

  • For instance, a scientist might warn, “Don’t drink that, it’s a hazardous brew of chemicals.”
  • In a mystery novel, a character might discover, “The victim was poisoned by a hazardous brew in their drink.”
  • A friend might say, “I accidentally created a hazardous brew while experimenting with different ingredients.”

13. Noxious potion

This term refers to a poisonous or harmful substance that is often consumed as a drink or potion. It is used to describe a toxic liquid or mixture that can cause harm or illness.

  • For example, a witch in a fairy tale might create a noxious potion to harm her enemies.
  • In a fantasy novel, a character might encounter a noxious potion that has magical properties.
  • A doctor might warn, “Be careful not to ingest any noxious potions, they can be deadly.”

14. Deadly draft

This term refers to a poisonous or lethal drink that can cause death when consumed. It is often used to describe a beverage that has been intentionally tainted with a toxic substance.

  • For instance, a detective might discover, “The victim was killed by a deadly draft of poison.”
  • In a murder mystery, a character might say, “I suspect the deadly draft was meant for someone else.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Would you like a deadly draft or something less lethal?”

15. Venomous elixir

This term refers to a poisonous or toxic liquid that is often consumed as a drink or potion. It is used to describe a substance that can cause harm or illness when ingested.

  • For example, a villain in a superhero movie might possess a vial of venomous elixir.
  • In a fantasy novel, a character might encounter a venomous elixir with magical properties.
  • A scientist might caution, “Handle the venomous elixir with extreme care, it’s highly toxic.”

16. Maleficent mixture

This term refers to a poisonous mixture or potion that is intended to cause harm or death. It suggests a sense of malicious intent behind the creation of the poison.

  • For example, in a fantasy novel, a character might say, “Beware of the maleficent mixture brewed by the evil sorceress.”
  • In a crime investigation, a detective might describe a toxic substance as a “maleficent mixture” used to poison the victim.
  • A conspiracy theorist might claim, “There’s evidence of a maleficent mixture being used to control people’s minds.”

17. Sinister solution

This term refers to a poisonous substance that is presented as a solution or remedy, but in reality, it is harmful or deadly. It implies a deceptive nature behind the poison.

  • For instance, in a mystery novel, a character might discover a bottle labeled as a “sinister solution” that was being used to poison someone.
  • In a medical drama, a doctor might identify a dangerous substance as a “sinister solution” that was mistakenly administered to a patient.
  • A whistleblower might reveal, “The company was producing a sinister solution and marketing it as a miracle cure.”

18. Viper

This term is used metaphorically to refer to poison. It draws a parallel between the deadly nature of a venomous snake and the harmful effects of poison.

  • For example, a spy might refer to a lethal substance as a “viper” in a secret mission.
  • In a crime thriller, a detective might say, “The victim was injected with viper, a deadly poison.”
  • A poet might use the term in a metaphorical sense, saying, “Her words were like a viper, injecting poison into my heart.”

19. Dose

In the context of slang for poison, “dose” refers to a specific amount or quantity of a poisonous substance. It implies that even a small amount of the poison can have a significant impact.

  • For instance, a detective investigating a poisoning might say, “The victim ingested a lethal dose of poison.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might warn, “Even a small dose of certain substances can be fatal.”
  • A toxicologist might explain, “The effects of a poison depend on the dose, with higher doses being more dangerous.”

20. Brew

In the context of slang for poison, “brew” refers to a concoction or mixture of toxic substances. It suggests a process of creating a poisonous substance.

  • For example, a villain in a fantasy story might say, “I have brewed a deadly potion that will bring doom to all.”
  • In a crime investigation, a detective might describe the poison as a “mysterious brew” that was used to poison the victim.
  • A chemist might discuss the process of brewing a toxic substance, saying, “Creating a deadly brew requires precise measurements and knowledge of chemical reactions.”

21. Elixir

An elixir is a substance believed to have the power to cure all ills or prolong life indefinitely. It is often used in a metaphorical sense to describe something that is seen as a solution or remedy to a problem.

  • For example, “This new skincare product is being touted as the elixir for youthful skin.”
  • In a discussion about finding happiness, someone might say, “I believe that love is the elixir of life.”
  • A writer might describe a character as having “an elixir of charisma that captivated everyone they met.”
See also  Top 32 Slang For Bravery – Meaning & Usage

22. Potion

A potion is a liquid or substance with magical properties, often used in fantasy literature or games. It can also refer to a liquid or mixture with medicinal or poisonous properties.

  • For instance, in a fantasy novel, a character might concoct a potion that grants invisibility.
  • In a discussion about traditional medicine, someone might mention the use of herbal potions to treat ailments.
  • A person talking about a toxic substance might say, “Be careful not to ingest that potion, it’s deadly.”

23. Lethal

Lethal is an adjective that describes something that is capable of causing death or great harm. It is often used to describe substances or situations that pose a serious threat to life.

  • For example, “The snake’s venom is lethal and can kill within minutes.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous chemicals, someone might say, “Exposure to that substance can have lethal consequences.”
  • A news article might report, “The police officer fired his weapon in self-defense, resulting in a lethal shot.”

24. Tonic

A tonic is a liquid or substance believed to have a invigorating or restorative effect on the body or mind. It is often used to describe a drink or remedy that provides a sense of well-being or revitalization.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I like to have a gin and tonic as a tonic for my spirits.”
  • In a conversation about energy drinks, someone might say, “I rely on those beverages as a tonic to get me through the day.”
  • A person describing a motivating speaker might say, “His words were like a tonic, inspiring us to take action.”

25. Hemlock

Hemlock is a highly poisonous plant that can cause death if ingested. It is often used metaphorically to describe something that is dangerous or deadly.

  • For example, “The assassin used a hemlock extract to poison his target.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might say, “Staying in that situation is like drinking hemlock.”
  • A writer might describe a character as having “hemlock eyes,“hemlock eyes,” indicating their ability to deceive and harm others.

26. Cyanide

Cyanide is a highly toxic chemical compound that is often referred to as “the blue stuff” due to its blue color in certain forms. It is known for its deadly effects on the body, causing rapid and severe poisoning.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He slipped some of the blue stuff into her drink.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous substances, someone might mention, “Cyanide is often used as a quick and effective poison.”
  • A scientist studying toxicology might explain, “Cyanide works by interfering with the body’s ability to use oxygen, leading to cellular death.”

27. Mercury

Mercury is a heavy, silver-colored liquid metal that is known for its toxicity. It is often referred to as “quicksilver” due to its liquid state and its ability to flow and move quickly.

  • For instance, in an old alchemy text, mercury might be described as “the elusive quicksilver.”
  • In a conversation about environmental contamination, someone might mention, “Mercury is a dangerous substance that can bioaccumulate in the food chain.”
  • A chemistry teacher might caution, “Never handle mercury without proper safety precautions, as it can be absorbed through the skin and cause serious health issues.”

28. Nightshade

Nightshade refers to a group of plants that are known for their toxic properties. The term “deadly nightshade” is often used to specifically refer to the plant Atropa belladonna, which is highly poisonous.

  • For example, in a murder mystery novel, a character might say, “The victim was poisoned with deadly nightshade.”
  • In a discussion about poisonous plants, someone might mention, “Nightshade can be found in various parts of the world and has a long history of use in both medicine and poison.”
  • A botanist studying toxic plants might explain, “The toxins in nightshade plants can affect the nervous system, leading to symptoms such as dilated pupils and rapid heartbeat.”

29. Arsenic

Arsenic is a highly toxic element that is commonly associated with rat poison. It is often referred to as “rat poison” due to its historical use as a rodenticide.

  • For instance, in a crime TV show, a detective might say, “The suspect had a vial of rat poison containing arsenic.”
  • In a discussion about toxic substances, someone might mention, “Arsenic is a deadly poison that has been used throughout history.”
  • A toxicologist might explain, “Arsenic works by disrupting cellular function and can cause severe illness or death in high doses.”

30. Rat poison

Rat poison is a substance specifically designed to kill rats and other rodents. It is often referred to as “vermin killer” due to its purpose of eliminating pests.

  • For example, in a conversation about pest control, someone might say, “I had to use some vermin killer to get rid of a rat infestation.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of household chemicals, someone might mention, “Rat poison should always be kept out of reach of children and pets.”
  • An exterminator might explain, “Rat poison works by using toxic substances that are attractive to rodents, leading to their death.”

31. Cyan

Cyanide is a highly toxic chemical compound that can be fatal if ingested or inhaled. It is often used as a slang term for poison.

  • For example, a detective in a crime novel might say, “The victim was killed with a dose of cyan.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous substances, someone might mention, “Cyan is one of the deadliest poisons known to man.”
  • A person warning about potential dangers might say, “Be careful, that substance contains cyan, it’s extremely poisonous.”

32. Serpent

Serpent is a slang term for poison that is derived from the image of a snake, which is often associated with danger and toxicity.

  • For instance, a character in a fantasy novel might say, “Beware of the serpent’s venom, it can kill within minutes.”
  • In a conversation about deadly creatures, someone might mention, “The serpent’s bite contains a powerful poison.”
  • A person warning about hidden dangers might say, “Watch out for the serpent’s venom, it can be deadly.”

33. Death cap

The death cap is a highly toxic mushroom known scientifically as Amanita phalloides. It is one of the most poisonous mushrooms in the world and is often referred to as a slang term for poison.

  • For example, a mycologist might say, “The death cap contains a deadly poison called amatoxin.”
  • In a discussion about poisonous plants, someone might mention, “The death cap is responsible for many cases of mushroom poisoning.”
  • A person warning about the dangers of foraging might say, “Be careful, that mushroom looks like a death cap, it’s extremely poisonous.”

34. Belladonna

Belladonna is a poisonous plant known scientifically as Atropa belladonna. It contains toxic alkaloids that can be fatal if ingested. It is often used as a slang term for poison.

  • For instance, a character in a mystery novel might say, “The victim was poisoned with a dose of belladonna.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous plants, someone might mention, “Belladonna is one of the most toxic plants in existence.”
  • A person warning about potential dangers might say, “Stay away from belladonna, it’s highly poisonous.”

35. Datura

Datura is a type of poisonous plant that contains tropane alkaloids. It is commonly known as Devil’s Trumpet due to its trumpet-shaped flowers. The plant is highly toxic and can cause hallucinations, delirium, and even death if ingested.

  • For example, someone might say, “Be careful not to touch the Devil’s Trumpet plant, it’s datura and can be deadly.”
  • In a discussion about dangerous plants, a botanist might mention, “Datura is a poisonous plant that has been used in traditional medicine for its hallucinogenic properties.”
  • A person interested in herbal remedies might ask, “Has anyone ever tried using datura for its medicinal benefits?”

36. Aconite

Aconite is a highly toxic plant that contains aconitine, a deadly poison. It is also known as Monkshood due to the shape of its flowers resembling a monk’s hood. The plant has been historically used as a poison and has a long history of being used in assassinations and warfare.

  • For instance, a crime novel might feature a murder plot involving the use of aconite poison.
  • In a discussion about deadly plants, a botanist might mention, “Aconite is one of the most toxic plants in the world.”
  • A person interested in herbal medicine might ask, “Is it true that aconite can be used as a pain reliever if used in small doses?”

37. Ciguatoxin

Ciguatoxin is a naturally occurring toxin produced by certain species of marine algae. It accumulates in the flesh of fish, making them poisonous to humans. Ciguatoxin poisoning, also known as fish poisoning, can cause gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, and paralysis.

  • For example, a person might say, “I got fish poisoning from eating a fish contaminated with ciguatoxin.”
  • In a discussion about seafood safety, a chef might say, “It’s important to be aware of the risk of ciguatoxin poisoning when consuming certain types of fish.”
  • A person planning a vacation in a tropical location might ask, “Are there any precautions I should take to avoid ciguatoxin poisoning?”

38. Ricin

Ricin is a highly toxic protein derived from the seeds of the castor oil plant, also known as castor beans. It is one of the most potent natural toxins and can be lethal even in small doses. Ricin poisoning can occur through ingestion, inhalation, or injection.

  • For instance, in a crime TV show, a detective might investigate a case involving ricin poisoning.
  • In a discussion about bioterrorism, an expert might mention, “Ricin is a potential agent for biological warfare due to its high toxicity.”
  • A person interested in toxicology might ask, “What are the symptoms of ricin poisoning and how is it treated?”

39. Stramonium

Stramonium is a plant species in the nightshade family that contains tropane alkaloids. It is commonly known as Jimsonweed and has a long history of use as a poison and hallucinogen. Ingesting parts of the plant can cause hallucinations, delirium, and other toxic effects.

  • For example, a person might say, “Be careful not to touch Jimsonweed, it’s stramonium and can be dangerous.”
  • In a discussion about psychoactive plants, a botanist might mention, “Stramonium has been used for its hallucinogenic properties in certain cultural practices.”
  • A person interested in herbal remedies might ask, “Are there any medicinal uses for stramonium, or is it strictly toxic?”

40. Curare

Curare is a type of poison traditionally used by indigenous tribes in South America for hunting. It is typically applied to blowgun darts or arrows, and it paralyzes the prey by blocking nerve impulses to the muscles.

  • For example, a documentary about the Amazon rainforest might mention, “The indigenous people use curare to hunt monkeys and other small animals.”
  • In a discussion about traditional hunting methods, someone might say, “Curare is a highly effective dart poison.”
  • A biologist studying the effects of toxins might explain, “Curare works by binding to the receptors in the motor endplate of skeletal muscles, preventing the transmission of nerve signals.”

41. Oleander

Oleander is a poisonous plant that is native to the Mediterranean region. It contains toxic compounds that affect the heart, and ingestion of any part of the plant can be fatal.

  • For instance, a gardener might warn, “Be careful not to touch or ingest any part of the oleander plant, as it is highly toxic.”
  • In a discussion about toxic plants, someone might mention, “Oleander is one of the most poisonous common garden plants.”
  • A medical professional might explain, “Oleander poisoning can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, irregular heart rhythm, and even death.”

42. Tetrodotoxin

Tetrodotoxin is a potent neurotoxin found in certain species of pufferfish, as well as other marine animals. It blocks sodium channels in nerve cells, leading to paralysis and potentially death if ingested in large amounts.

  • For example, a sushi chef might warn, “Only specially trained chefs can prepare fugu, as it requires removing the tetrodotoxin-containing organs.”
  • In a discussion about deadly toxins, someone might say, “Tetrodotoxin is one of the most potent naturally occurring toxins.”
  • A toxicologist studying marine toxins might explain, “Tetrodotoxin acts by blocking the action potential in nerve cells, leading to muscle paralysis and respiratory failure.”

43. Botulinum

Botulinum is a neurotoxic protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It causes a condition known as botulism, which can result in paralysis and even death. However, it is also used in small, controlled doses for cosmetic purposes, such as reducing wrinkles.

  • For instance, someone considering getting Botox injections might ask, “What are the potential side effects of botulinum toxin?”
  • In a discussion about food safety, someone might mention, “Botulinum toxin can be produced in improperly canned foods.”
  • A medical professional might explain, “Botulinum toxin works by blocking the release of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, leading to muscle paralysis.”

44. Coniine

Coniine is a toxic alkaloid found in the poison hemlock plant. It affects the central nervous system and can cause paralysis and respiratory failure if ingested in large amounts.

  • For example, a hiker might warn, “Avoid touching or eating any plant that resembles parsley, as it might be poison hemlock containing coniine.”
  • In a discussion about deadly plants, someone might say, “Coniine is one of the main toxic compounds in poison hemlock.”
  • A botanist studying toxic plants might explain, “Coniine acts as a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, leading to muscle paralysis and eventually death.”

45. Nicotine

Nicotine is a highly addictive chemical found in tobacco products, such as cigarettes. “Cancer stick” is a derogatory term often used to refer to cigarettes due to their link to various types of cancer.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to quit smoking these cancer sticks.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of smoking, someone might warn, “Those cancer sticks will kill you.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any cancer sticks? I need a smoke.”

46. Scopolamine

Scopolamine is a powerful drug derived from plants in the nightshade family. “Devil’s Breath” is a colloquial term often used to refer to scopolamine due to its ability to induce a state of extreme suggestibility and memory loss.

  • For instance, in a discussion about dangerous drugs, someone might mention, “Have you heard of Devil’s Breath? It’s a terrifying substance.”
  • A news article might warn, “Beware of criminals using Devil’s Breath to incapacitate their victims.”
  • A person recounting a personal experience might say, “I was slipped Devil’s Breath unknowingly, and I don’t remember anything that happened that night.”

47. Thallium

Thallium is a highly toxic heavy metal. “Inheritance powder” is a darkly humorous term often used to refer to thallium due to its historical use as a poison for inheritance schemes.

  • For example, in a conversation about famous poisonings, someone might mention, “Thallium was known as the inheritance powder.”
  • A crime documentary might explain, “Thallium was a favorite choice for murderers seeking to inherit wealth.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of heavy metals might warn, “Be careful with thallium – it’s not called inheritance powder for nothing.”

48. Radium

Radium is a radioactive element that emits a faint glow. “Glow-in-the-dark” is a playful term often used to refer to radium due to its luminescent properties.

  • For instance, in a discussion about historical radioactive materials, someone might mention, “Radium was the original glow-in-the-dark substance.”
  • A science enthusiast might explain, “Radium’s glow-in-the-dark properties were once used in various products, including watch dials.”
  • A person talking about the dangers of radiation might say, “You don’t want to play with glow-in-the-dark stuff like radium.”

49. Plutonium

Plutonium is a highly radioactive element used as a fuel in nuclear reactors. “Nuclear fuel” is a technical term often used to refer to plutonium due to its role in generating nuclear power.

  • For example, in a conversation about nuclear energy, someone might mention, “Plutonium is a key nuclear fuel.”
  • A news article might discuss, “The dangers of mishandling nuclear fuel like plutonium.”
  • A person interested in science might ask, “What are the properties of plutonium as a nuclear fuel?”

50. Uranium

Uranium is a radioactive chemical element that is commonly associated with nuclear power and weapons. It is highly toxic and can cause severe health effects if ingested or inhaled.

  • For instance, “Exposure to uranium can lead to radiation sickness and long-term health problems.”
  • In a discussion about nuclear energy, someone might say, “Uranium is the primary fuel used in nuclear reactors.”
  • A scientist studying radiation might mention, “Uranium is used as a reference material in radiation experiments.”

51. Polonium

Polonium is a highly toxic radioactive element that is known for its use in assassinations, most notably the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko in 2006. It is a rare and dangerous substance.

  • For example, “Polonium can be lethal even in small doses.”
  • In a discussion about radioactive materials, someone might ask, “What are the properties of polonium?”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities suspect the use of polonium in the poisoning case.”

52. Lead

Lead is a toxic heavy metal that can cause serious health problems, especially in children. It was commonly used in paint and gasoline in the past, but its use has been restricted due to its harmful effects.

  • For instance, “Lead poisoning can lead to developmental delays and learning difficulties.”
  • In a discussion about environmental toxins, someone might mention, “Lead contamination in water is a major concern.”
  • A health expert might advise, “Avoid using products that contain lead to protect yourself from lead poisoning.”

53. Cadmium

Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal that is commonly found in batteries, pigments, and plastics. It can accumulate in the body over time and cause damage to the kidneys, lungs, and bones.

  • For example, “Exposure to cadmium can lead to lung cancer.”
  • In a discussion about workplace safety, someone might say, “Workers in industries that handle cadmium need to take precautions to avoid exposure.”
  • A scientist studying environmental toxins might mention, “Cadmium pollution is a significant concern in some areas.”

54. Toxin

A toxin is a poisonous substance produced by living organisms, such as bacteria, plants, or animals. It can cause harm or death when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed by the body.

  • For instance, “Snake venom is a potent toxin.”
  • In a discussion about food safety, someone might ask, “How can we prevent toxins from contaminating our food?”
  • A doctor treating a patient might say, “We need to determine the source of the toxin to provide appropriate treatment.”

55. Bane

This term refers to a poisonous substance that can cause harm or death. It is often used metaphorically to describe something that is extremely harmful or destructive.

  • For example, “The poison in the villain’s dagger was his bane.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might say, “Her constant criticism was my bane.”
  • A person warning about the dangers of a certain chemical might say, “That substance is a bane to our health.”

56. Viper’s brew

This slang term refers to a poisonous drink or mixture. It is often used figuratively to describe something that is harmful or dangerous.

  • For instance, “He drank a sip of the viper’s brew and immediately fell ill.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous substances, someone might say, “That chemical is like a viper’s brew.”
  • A person warning about a harmful combination of drugs might say, “Mixing those two substances is like drinking a viper’s brew.”

57. Black draft

This term refers to a deadly potion or concoction. It is often used metaphorically to describe something that is extremely harmful or dangerous.

  • For example, “The black draft was the weapon of choice for assassins.”
  • In a discussion about harmful substances, someone might say, “That chemical is like a black draft.”
  • A person warning about the dangers of a certain medication might say, “That drug can be a black draft if not taken properly.”