Top 56 Slang For Police – Meaning & Usage

Law enforcement officers play a crucial role in maintaining safety and order in our communities. However, they are often referred to by various slang terms that may not be familiar to everyone. Whether you’re a true crime enthusiast or just curious about the language used to describe the men and women in blue, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we uncover the top slang for police that you need to know to stay in the loop!

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1. 5-0

Derived from the television show “Hawaii Five-O,” this term is used to refer to the police. It can be used to describe law enforcement in general or specific police officers.

  • For example, “Watch out, the 5-0 are patrolling the area tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I got pulled over by the 5-0 for speeding.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might comment, “The 5-0 are cracking down on drug dealers in the city.”

2. The Fuzz

This slang term is used to refer to the police, especially when emphasizing their presence or authority. It is often used in a slightly derogatory or mocking manner.

  • For instance, “The fuzz showed up and shut down the party.”
  • A person might say, “I saw the fuzz arresting someone on the street.”
  • In a discussion about police action, someone might comment, “The fuzz are always harassing innocent people.”

3. The Law

This term is used to refer to the police as enforcers of the law. It can also be used to refer to the legal system in general.

  • For example, “I don’t want to mess with the law, so I always follow the speed limit.”
  • A person might say, “The law caught up with the criminal after months of investigation.”
  • In a conversation about crime prevention, someone might comment, “We need the law to crack down on drug trafficking.”

4. The Heat

This slang term is used to refer to the police, particularly when they are actively pursuing or investigating criminal activity. It implies a sense of pressure or intensity.

  • For instance, “The heat is on, so be careful not to get caught.”
  • A person might say, “I saw the heat raiding a suspected drug house.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might comment, “The heat needs to do more to combat gang violence.”

5. Po-Po

Derived from the French word “policier,” this term is used to refer to the police. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I saw the po-po driving by with their sirens on.”
  • A person might say, “I called the po-po to report a noise disturbance.”
  • In a conversation about law enforcement, someone might comment, “The po-po are here to keep the peace.”

6. Cops

This term is a shorthand way of referring to police officers. It is commonly used in informal conversation and media.

  • For example, a person might say, “I saw the cops patrolling the neighborhood last night.”
  • In a crime show, a character might exclaim, “The cops are closing in on the suspect!”
  • A news headline might read, “Cops arrest suspect in bank robbery.”

7. Boys in Blue

This phrase is a slang term used to refer to police officers, emphasizing the color of their uniforms. It is often used in a lighthearted or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The boys in blue are here to keep the peace.”
  • In a comedy movie, a character might joke, “Better watch out, the boys in blue are on their way!”
  • A person might comment, “I feel safe knowing the boys in blue are patrolling the streets.”

8. The Man

This term is used to refer to the police or any other authority figure who is seen as being in control or having power. It can have a negative connotation, suggesting oppression or authority.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t mess with The Man, or you’ll get in trouble.”
  • In a protest, a chant might go, “Down with The Man, up with the people!”
  • A person discussing government control might say, “The Man is always watching, we need to fight for our rights.”

9. The Badge

This term refers to the emblem or identification worn by police officers. It is often used to refer to police officers themselves.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The badge arrived at the scene of the crime.”
  • In a detective novel, a character might say, “I trust the badge to solve this case.”
  • A person might comment, “The badge represents honor and service in law enforcement.”

10. The Blue

This phrase is a shortened way of referring to police officers, emphasizing the color of their uniforms. It is commonly used in informal conversation and media.

  • For example, a person might say, “I saw The Blue patrolling the streets last night.”
  • In a crime show, a character might say, “The Blue are always there to protect and serve.”
  • A news headline might read, “The Blue apprehend suspect in high-speed chase.”

11. The Brass

This term refers to high-ranking officers in the police force. It is often used to describe those in positions of authority or power within the police hierarchy.

  • For example, “The brass are meeting to discuss new strategies for combating crime.”
  • In a conversation about promotions, someone might say, “He’s been with the force for years, he’s bound to make it to the brass eventually.”
  • A police officer might refer to their superiors as “the brass” when discussing a decision made by higher-ups.

12. The Authorities

This term is a general reference to the police or any law enforcement agency. It is often used to describe the individuals or organizations responsible for maintaining law and order.

  • For instance, “The authorities are investigating the crime scene.”
  • In a discussion about a recent arrest, someone might say, “The authorities finally caught the suspect.”
  • A person voicing their support for law enforcement might say, “We need to respect the authorities and the difficult job they do.”

13. The Force

This term is a common nickname for a police department. It is often used to refer to the collective group of police officers who work together to enforce the law and maintain order.

  • For example, “He’s been serving in the force for over 20 years.”
  • In a conversation about crime rates, someone might say, “The force is doing a great job at reducing crime in our neighborhood.”
  • A police officer might say, “I’m proud to be part of the force and protect our community.”

14. The Feds

This term is a colloquial abbreviation for federal law enforcement agencies, such as the FBI or DEA. It is often used to refer to agents or officers who work for these federal agencies.

  • For instance, “The feds are cracking down on drug trafficking.”
  • In a conversation about a high-profile case, someone might say, “The feds have taken over the investigation.”
  • A person discussing the role of federal law enforcement might say, “The feds play a crucial role in combating organized crime and terrorism.”

15. The Five-O

This term is derived from the television show “Hawaii Five-O” and is commonly used to refer to police officers in general. It is often used in a more casual or lighthearted context.

  • For example, “Watch out, the five-o are patrolling the streets tonight.”
  • In a conversation about a traffic stop, someone might say, “I got pulled over by the five-o for speeding.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to a police officer as “one of the five-o” when discussing a minor encounter with law enforcement.
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16. The Pigs

This slang term is often used to express disdain or disrespect towards police officers. It is considered derogatory and offensive.

  • For example, in a protest against police brutality, a protester might chant, “Down with the pigs!”
  • In a conversation about encounters with law enforcement, someone might say, “I can’t stand dealing with the pigs.”
  • A person expressing frustration with police tactics might comment, “The pigs are always harassing innocent people.”

17. The Coppers

This slang term is a colloquial way of referring to police officers. It is commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I saw the coppers patrolling the neighborhood last night.”
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, a person might mention, “The coppers are doing their best to keep the streets safe.”
  • A character in a crime novel might refer to the police as “the coppers” when talking about their investigation.

18. The Constabulary

This term is a more formal way of referring to the police force or individual police officers. It is often used in official or legal contexts.

  • For example, a news article might report, “The constabulary is investigating the incident.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement agencies, someone might mention, “The constabulary plays a crucial role in maintaining public safety.”
  • A lawyer might refer to the police as “the constabulary” when presenting a case in court.

19. The Gestapo

This slang term is a derogatory reference to the Gestapo, the secret police force of Nazi Germany known for their brutality and oppression. It is used to criticize or compare a police force or officers to the Gestapo.

  • For instance, in a heated debate about police tactics, someone might accuse the officers of acting like the Gestapo.
  • In a discussion about historical abuses of power, a person might say, “We must ensure our police force doesn’t become the Gestapo.”
  • A protester might hold a sign saying, “No to a modern-day Gestapo!”

20. The Mounties

This slang term refers to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the federal and national law enforcement agency in Canada. It is often used to refer to Canadian police officers in general.

  • For example, a traveler in Canada might say, “I saw the Mounties patrolling the streets of Ottawa.”
  • In a discussion about Canadian law enforcement, someone might mention, “The Mounties have a long and storied history.”
  • A character in a TV show set in Canada might refer to the police as “the Mounties” when talking about a crime investigation.

21. The Rozzers

This term is a slang for the police. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “Watch out, the rozzers are around the corner!”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “I had to run from the rozzers after the heist.”
  • A person discussing law enforcement might ask, “What is the public’s perception of the rozzers?”

22. The Old Bill

This term is another slang for the police, particularly used in British English. It is believed to be derived from the name of Sir Robert Peel, who is considered the father of modern policing.

  • For instance, “I saw the old bill patrolling the streets last night.”
  • In a conversation about crime rates, someone might say, “The old bill is cracking down on gang activity.”
  • A person discussing law enforcement might mention, “The old bill plays a crucial role in maintaining public safety.”

23. The Filth

This term is a derogatory slang for the police. It is often used to express disdain or contempt towards law enforcement.

  • For example, “I can’t stand the filth, they’re always harassing innocent people.”
  • In a protest against police brutality, someone might shout, “Down with the filth!”
  • A person discussing police misconduct might say, “The actions of the filth have eroded public trust in law enforcement.”

24. The Law Enforcement

This term is a more formal way of referring to the police or those who enforce the law.

  • For instance, “Law enforcement agencies are working together to combat organized crime.”
  • In a discussion about police training, someone might say, “Proper training is essential for effective law enforcement.”
  • A person discussing the role of law enforcement might mention, “The primary duty of law enforcement is to protect and serve the community.”

25. The Gendarmes

This term is a slang for the police, particularly used in French-speaking countries. It refers to the uniformed police force.

  • For example, “The gendarmes were quick to respond to the emergency.”
  • In a conversation about traffic enforcement, someone might say, “I got stopped by the gendarmes for speeding.”
  • A person discussing international law enforcement might mention, “The gendarmes play a crucial role in maintaining public order in France.”

26. Feds

This term is used to refer to federal law enforcement agents, such as FBI agents or DEA agents. It can also be used to refer to the federal government as a whole.

  • For example, in a crime show, a character might say, “The feds are closing in on us.”
  • In a discussion about government surveillance, someone might comment, “The feds have access to all our digital communications.”
  • A person discussing a federal investigation might ask, “Do you think the feds will catch the suspect?”

27. Pigs

This is a derogatory slang term used to refer to police officers. It is often used to express contempt or disrespect towards law enforcement.

  • For instance, during a protest against police brutality, someone might chant, “No justice, no peace, abolish the pigs.”
  • In a conversation about encounters with the police, someone might say, “I got pulled over by a couple of pigs for no reason.”
  • A person expressing frustration with law enforcement might exclaim, “Those pigs are always harassing innocent people!”

28. Blue

This term is used to refer to police officers. It originated from the blue uniforms commonly worn by law enforcement officers.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “The blue are on their way, we need to move quickly.”
  • In a discussion about community policing, someone might comment, “Building trust between the community and the blue is crucial.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was stopped by the blue for a routine traffic check.”

29. Smokey

This term is used to refer to state troopers, who are law enforcement officers responsible for enforcing traffic laws and patrolling highways. It originated from the smokey bear hats worn by state troopers.

  • For instance, in a road trip movie, a character might say, “Watch out, there’s a smokey up ahead.”
  • In a discussion about speeding tickets, someone might comment, “I got pulled over by a smokey for going over the speed limit.”
  • A person warning others about a speed trap might say, “Be careful, there are a couple of smokeys hiding behind that billboard.”

30. One Time

This term is used to refer to police officers. It is believed to have originated from the idea that when someone sees the police, they only have one time to run or hide.

  • For example, in a rap song, the lyrics might mention, “I saw the one time and had to stash my drugs.”
  • In a conversation about encounters with law enforcement, someone might say, “I got stopped by the one time, but luckily they let me go with a warning.”
  • A person expressing caution about illegal activities might say, “Always be aware of the one time, they’re always watching.”

31. 12

This term refers to an undercover police officer. The number “12” is believed to have originated from the police radio code for “officer needs assistance.”

  • For example, in a conversation about crime, someone might say, “Watch out, there might be a 12 lurking around.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement tactics, a person might mention, “The 12s are trained to blend in with the crowd.”
  • A character in a crime novel might refer to an undercover officer as “one of the 12s.”
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32. The Po-lice

This is a slang term for the police, often used in urban settings. It is derived from the word “police” and is used to refer to law enforcement officers.

  • For instance, in a conversation about crime, someone might say, “I saw the po-lice driving by earlier.”
  • In a discussion about police presence, a person might mention, “The po-lice are cracking down on illegal activities in this area.”
  • A character in a movie might exclaim, “Oh no, it’s the po-lice! Run!”

33. The Popo

Similar to “the po-lice,” this term is slang for the police. It is derived from the word “police” and is often used in casual or informal conversations.

  • For example, in a conversation about a recent crime, someone might say, “Did you hear what happened? The popo are investigating.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement, a person might mention, “The popo are responsible for maintaining public order.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “I can’t believe we got caught by the popo!”

34. The Copper

This term is a slang term for a police officer. It is derived from the copper badges that were historically worn by law enforcement officers.

  • For instance, in a conversation about a crime investigation, someone might say, “The coppers are working hard to solve the case.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement training, a person might mention, “Becoming a copper requires physical and mental fitness.”
  • A character in a crime novel might refer to a police officer as “one of the coppers.”

35. The Blue Line

This term refers to the police force as a whole. It is derived from the blue uniforms often worn by law enforcement officers.

  • For example, in a conversation about a protest, someone might say, “The blue line is here to maintain order.”
  • In a discussion about community safety, a person might mention, “The blue line plays a crucial role in preventing and solving crimes.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I have friends in the blue line who can help us out.”

36. The Sarge

This term is used to refer to a police officer with the rank of sergeant. It is often used to show respect or familiarity with the officer.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “The Sarge wants us to patrol the area tonight.”
  • In a movie or TV show, a character might say, “I need to talk to the Sarge about this case.”
  • A citizen might ask, “Can I speak to the Sarge about filing a complaint?”

37. The Sheriff

This term refers to the highest law enforcement officer in a county or jurisdiction. The sheriff is typically elected and has authority over local law enforcement.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The Sheriff is responsible for maintaining law and order in our town.”
  • In a western film, a character might say, “The Sheriff is rounding up a posse to catch the outlaws.”
  • A citizen might ask, “Can I speak to the Sheriff about a safety concern in my neighborhood?”

38. The Deputy

This term is used to refer to a police officer who works under the authority of a sheriff. Deputies assist the sheriff in carrying out law enforcement duties.

  • For example, a person might say, “The Deputy arrested the suspect and brought them to the county jail.”
  • In a TV show, a character might say, “The Deputy is investigating a series of burglaries in our town.”
  • A citizen might ask, “Can I speak to the Deputy about a traffic ticket I received?”

39. The Captain

This term refers to a high-ranking officer within a police department. Captains are often in charge of a specific division or unit and have authority over a group of officers.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “The Captain wants us to increase patrols in the downtown area.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “The Captain is leading the investigation into the serial killer.”
  • A citizen might ask, “Can I speak to the Captain about a neighborhood watch program?”

40. The Chief

This term is used to refer to the highest-ranking officer within a police department. The Chief of Police is responsible for overseeing the entire department and making strategic decisions.

  • For example, a person might say, “The Chief is implementing new policies to improve community relations.”
  • In a TV show, a character might say, “The Chief is under pressure to solve the murder case.”
  • A citizen might ask, “Can I speak to the Chief about a concern regarding police misconduct?”

41. The Cop Shop

This term is used to refer to a police station, where police officers work and carry out their duties. It is often used in a casual or colloquial manner.

  • For example, “I had to go down to the cop shop to file a report.”
  • In a conversation about a crime investigation, someone might say, “The suspect was taken to the cop shop for questioning.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might mention, “I got pulled over and ended up spending a few hours at the cop shop.”

42. The Precinct

Similar to “The Cop Shop,” this term is also used to refer to a police station. It is commonly used in urban settings.

  • For instance, “The suspect was taken to the precinct for further investigation.”
  • In a discussion about police operations, someone might mention, “The precinct is responsible for patrolling a specific area.”
  • A person reminiscing about their childhood might say, “I used to pass by the precinct every day on my way to school.”

43. The Beat

This term refers to the specific area or route that a police officer is assigned to patrol. It is often used to describe the regular route or territory of a police officer.

  • For example, “The officer walked his beat, keeping an eye out for any suspicious activity.”
  • In a conversation about police presence, someone might say, “There’s always a police officer patrolling the beat in this neighborhood.”
  • A person discussing community policing might mention, “Officers on the beat build relationships with residents and businesses.”

44. The Cruiser

This term is used to refer to a police car or patrol vehicle. It is often associated with the image of a traditional police car, typically a large sedan or SUV.

  • For instance, “The officer hopped into the cruiser and turned on the siren.”
  • In a discussion about police equipment, someone might say, “The cruiser is equipped with various tools and technology for law enforcement.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might mention, “I saw the cruiser parked outside the convenience store.”

45. The Squad Car

Similar to “The Cruiser,” this term is also used to refer to a police car or patrol vehicle. It is commonly used in urban and suburban settings.

  • For example, “The suspect was apprehended and placed in the back of the squad car.”
  • In a conversation about police response time, someone might say, “The squad car arrived at the scene within minutes.”
  • A person discussing police visibility might mention, “Having squad cars patrolling the streets deters crime and provides a sense of security.”

46. The Black and White

This term refers to a police car, typically one that is painted black and white. The contrasting colors are often used to make the vehicle more visible and recognizable as a police car.

  • For example, “I saw the black and white pull someone over for speeding.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement, someone might say, “The black and white is an iconic symbol of the police.”
  • A person witnessing a police chase might exclaim, “Look at that black and white racing down the street!”

47. The Blue and White

Similar to “The Black and White,” this term also refers to a police car. However, the car is typically painted blue and white instead of black and white. The colors may vary depending on the specific police department.

  • For instance, “The blue and white was parked outside the bank during the robbery.”
  • In a conversation about different police vehicles, someone might mention, “Some departments use blue and white cars, while others use black and white.”
  • A person describing a police car they saw might say, “It was a blue and white with the word ‘Police’ written on the side.”

48. The Unit

This term is used to refer to a police department as a whole. It emphasizes the unity and collective nature of the police force, working together as a unit to enforce the law and maintain public safety.

  • For example, “The unit responded quickly to the emergency call.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement agencies, someone might say, “Every unit has its own specific responsibilities and jurisdiction.”
  • A person expressing gratitude for the police might say, “I’m grateful for the hard work and dedication of the entire unit.”

49. The Paddy Wagon

This term refers to a police van or vehicle used for transporting multiple suspects or prisoners. The term “paddy wagon” has historical roots and is believed to have originated from the large number of Irish immigrants who were arrested and transported in these vehicles.

  • For instance, “The suspects were loaded into the paddy wagon and taken to the police station.”
  • In a conversation about police tactics, someone might mention, “The paddy wagon is often used to transport individuals during mass arrests.”
  • A person witnessing a police operation might say, “I saw the paddy wagon parked outside the building.”

50. The Jailor

This term refers to a police officer who is responsible for enforcing the law and making arrests. It emphasizes their role in apprehending and detaining individuals who have committed crimes.

  • For example, “The jailor quickly apprehended the suspect and brought them into custody.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement careers, someone might say, “Being a jailor requires physical fitness and the ability to handle stressful situations.”
  • A person expressing gratitude for the police might say, “I appreciate the dedication and bravery of the jailors who protect our community.”

51. The Peacekeeper

This term refers to a police officer or any individual responsible for maintaining peace and order in a community. The term “peacekeeper” emphasizes the role of police officers in preventing and resolving conflicts.

  • For example, during a protest, someone might say, “The peacekeepers are here to ensure everyone’s safety.”
  • In a news article about community policing, a writer might mention, “The peacekeepers work closely with residents to address neighborhood issues.”
  • A citizen might express gratitude by saying, “I feel safer knowing the peacekeepers are patrolling our streets.”

52. The Watchman

This term refers to a police officer who diligently watches over and protects the community. It emphasizes the role of police officers as guardians of the peace and safety of the people.

  • For instance, in a crime novel, a character might say, “The watchman spotted the suspicious activity and called for backup.”
  • In a conversation about community safety, someone might mention, “We rely on the watchmen to keep our neighborhoods secure.”
  • A citizen might express appreciation by saying, “Thank you to all the watchmen who work tirelessly to keep us safe.”

53. The Gendarme

This term is used to refer to a police officer in France. The term “gendarme” is derived from the French word for “armed men” and is often associated with the military-style policing in France.

  • For example, in a travel blog, a writer might mention, “The gendarmes were patrolling the streets of Paris.”
  • In a discussion about international law enforcement, someone might say, “The gendarmerie plays a crucial role in maintaining public order in France.”
  • A tourist might ask for directions by saying, “Excuse me, do you know where I can find a gendarme station?”

54. The Mountie

This term refers to a police officer who serves in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). The term “Mountie” is derived from the RCMP’s iconic horse-mounted patrols.

  • For instance, in a Canadian TV show, a character might say, “The Mountie always gets his man.”
  • In a conversation about Canadian law enforcement, someone might mention, “The Mounties are known for their iconic red serge uniforms.”
  • A tourist visiting Canada might take a photo with a Mountie and say, “I met a real Mountie today!”

55. The Trooper

This term is commonly used to refer to a state police officer in the United States. The term “trooper” emphasizes the officer’s role in enforcing traffic laws and maintaining order on state highways.

  • For example, during a traffic stop, a driver might say, “Yes, Trooper, I understand why you pulled me over.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement agencies, someone might mention, “State troopers often assist local police departments in rural areas.”
  • A citizen might express gratitude by saying, “Thank you to all the troopers who keep our highways safe.”

56. The Ranger

This term is used to refer to a police officer, especially one who works in a rural or wilderness area. It can also be used to refer to a member of a specialized law enforcement unit, such as park rangers or forest rangers.

  • For example, “The ranger patrolled the national park to ensure the safety of visitors.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement agencies, someone might say, “The rangers are responsible for protecting wildlife and enforcing conservation laws.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I encountered a ranger while hiking and they gave me some helpful tips on staying safe in the wilderness.”