Top 50 Slang For Poorly – Meaning & Usage

Feeling under the weather? We’ve got you covered with a roundup of the top slang terms for feeling poorly. From feeling “under the weather” to being “under the pump,” our team has put together a list that will have you nodding in agreement and maybe even learning a new phrase or two. So sit back, grab a warm cup of tea, and get ready to dive into the world of slang for feeling unwell!

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1. Under the weather

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is not feeling their best or is experiencing mild illness or discomfort.

  • For example, “I can’t come to work today, I’m feeling a bit under the weather.”
  • A friend might say, “You should stay home and rest if you’re feeling under the weather.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’ve been feeling under the weather all week, I think I caught a cold.”

2. Off

When someone feels “off,” it means they are not feeling their usual self or something is not quite right with their physical or mental state.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling off today, I think I might be coming down with something.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t explain it, but I just feel off lately.”
  • Someone might comment, “When I’m feeling off, I like to take some time for self-care and relaxation.”

3. Out of sorts

When someone is out of sorts, it means they are feeling unsettled, emotionally or physically, and not quite themselves.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling out of sorts ever since I had that argument.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not sure why, but I’ve been feeling out of sorts lately.”
  • Someone might comment, “If you’re feeling out of sorts, it’s important to take care of yourself and seek support if needed.”

4. Lousy

When someone feels lousy, it means they are feeling generally unwell, miserable, or in a state of discomfort.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling lousy today, I think I caught a stomach bug.”
  • A person might say, “I feel lousy every time allergy season rolls around.”
  • Someone might comment, “Feeling lousy can really put a damper on your mood and energy levels.”

5. Rough

When someone feels rough, it means they are feeling physically or emotionally unwell and not functioning at their best.

  • For example, “I had a rough night’s sleep, so I’m feeling a bit rough today.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been going through a rough patch lately, and it’s taking a toll on my well-being.”
  • Someone might comment, “Feeling rough can make it difficult to focus and perform daily tasks.”

6. Not up to snuff

This phrase is used to describe something that is not of the expected or desired quality or standard.

  • For example, “The quality of the food at that restaurant was not up to snuff.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might say, “Your work on this project was not up to snuff.”
  • A disappointed customer might complain, “The customer service at that store was not up to snuff.”

7. Below par

This term is used to describe something that is not up to the expected or desired level of performance or quality.

  • For instance, “His golf game was below par today.”
  • A teacher might comment, “Your recent test scores are below par.”
  • In a product review, a customer might say, “The battery life of this phone is below par.”

8. Under par

This phrase is used to describe something that is performing better than expected or exceeding the desired level of performance or quality.

  • For example, “Her presentation was under par and impressed the entire team.”
  • A coach might say, “Your performance in the game was under par, keep it up!”
  • A customer might rave, “The service at that restaurant was under par, I highly recommend it.”

9. Off-color

This term is used to describe something that is considered to be in poor taste or inappropriate.

  • For instance, “His jokes during the meeting were off-color and made everyone uncomfortable.”
  • A reviewer might comment, “The language used in this book is off-color and may not be suitable for all readers.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful with your remarks, some of them can be off-color and offend others.”

10. Peaky

This slang term is used to describe someone who is feeling unwell, weak, or generally not in good health.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling peaky all day, I think I caught a cold.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m not going to the party tonight, I’m feeling peaky.”
  • A person might complain, “I’ve been feeling peaky for weeks now, I should see a doctor.”

11. Queasy

Feeling sick to your stomach, often accompanied by a sense of unease or discomfort.

  • For example, “I ate too much at the buffet and now I’m feeling queasy.”
  • A person might say, “The rocking motion of the boat made me feel queasy.”
  • Someone experiencing motion sickness might say, “I always get queasy when I ride roller coasters.”

12. Wiped out

Feeling extremely tired or fatigued, to the point of complete exhaustion.

  • For instance, “After running a marathon, I was completely wiped out.”
  • A person who stayed up all night might say, “I’m so wiped out, I can barely keep my eyes open.”
  • Someone who just finished a long day of work might exclaim, “I’m wiped out, time for bed!”

13. Knackered

British slang for feeling extremely tired or worn out.

  • For example, “I’ve been working double shifts all week, I’m absolutely knackered.”
  • A person who just completed a physically demanding task might say, “I feel completely knackered.”
  • Someone who didn’t get enough sleep might complain, “I’m so knackered, I can barely function.”

14. Run down

Feeling tired and lacking energy, often due to physical or mental exertion.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I feel run down.”
  • A person who has been sick might say, “I’m still recovering, so I’m feeling a bit run down.”
  • Someone who has been traveling might exclaim, “I’ve been on the go for hours, I’m really run down.”

15. Off-colour

Feeling slightly sick or not in good health, but not seriously ill.

  • For example, “I woke up with a headache and feeling a bit off-colour.”
  • A person who has a mild cold might say, “I’m feeling a bit off-colour, but I’ll still go to work.”
  • Someone who is experiencing minor symptoms might comment, “I’m feeling off-colour, but I think it’s just allergies.”

16. Poorly

This term is used to describe a state of being unwell or sick. It can refer to both physical and mental health.

  • For example, “I’m feeling poorly today, so I’m going to stay home and rest.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been eating junk food all week and now I feel poorly.”
  • A person might comment, “She looks really poorly, we should check on her.”

17. Not oneself

This phrase is used to describe a person who is not feeling like their usual self. It can indicate a change in behavior, mood, or physical well-being.

  • For instance, “I’m not myself today, I’m feeling really tired.”
  • Someone might say, “Ever since the accident, he hasn’t been himself.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s not herself lately, I think something is bothering her.”

18. Down in the dumps

This expression is used to describe a person who is feeling down, sad, or depressed. It implies a low mood or a lack of enthusiasm.

  • For example, “I’ve been down in the dumps ever since I lost my job.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s been feeling down in the dumps lately, maybe we should cheer her up.”
  • A person might comment, “He looks really down in the dumps, I wonder what’s wrong.”

19. Off one’s game

This phrase is used to describe a person who is not performing as well as they normally do. It is often used in sports or competitive contexts.

  • For instance, “I don’t know what’s wrong with me, I’m totally off my game today.”
  • Someone might say, “He’s been off his game ever since his injury.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s usually a great player, but today she’s really off her game.”

20. Off one’s feed

This expression is used to describe a person or animal who is not eating or has a decreased appetite. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate a lack of interest or enthusiasm.

  • For example, “The sick child has been off her feed for a few days.”
  • Someone might say, “He’s been off his feed since he started the new medication.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s usually a foodie, but today she’s really off her feed.”

21. Off one’s rocker

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in an irrational or mentally unstable manner. It implies that the person is “off” their metaphorical “rocker,” which represents a state of stability or sanity.

  • For example, “After staying up all night, he was completely off his rocker.”
  • In a discussion about eccentric behavior, someone might say, “She’s definitely off her rocker, but in the best way possible.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “You must be off your rocker if you think I’m going to lend you money again.”

22. Off one’s trolley

Similar to “off one’s rocker,” this phrase is used to describe someone who is acting in an irrational or chaotic manner. The term “trolley” refers to a streetcar or tram, and being “off” it suggests being disconnected from the normal course of events.

  • For instance, “He went off his trolley when he found out he lost his job.”
  • In a conversation about unpredictable behavior, someone might say, “She’s completely off her trolley, you never know what she’ll do next.”
  • A person might jokingly comment, “I must be off my trolley to agree to go on that roller coaster.”

23. Out of kilter

This phrase is used to describe something that is not working correctly or is out of sync. The term “kilter” refers to a state of balance or proper functioning, so being “out of kilter” suggests a lack of stability or harmony.

  • For example, “Ever since the power outage, the computer has been completely out of kilter.”
  • In a discussion about a malfunctioning machine, someone might say, “The gears are out of kilter, that’s why it’s making that strange noise.”
  • A person might comment, “My sleep schedule is totally out of kilter after traveling across time zones.”

24. Out of whack

This phrase is used to describe something that is not in its correct or expected state. The term “whack” refers to a blow or strike, so being “out of whack” suggests a disruption or disturbance of the normal order.

  • For instance, “The oven temperature is out of whack, it keeps burning everything.”
  • In a conversation about a misaligned picture frame, someone might say, “It’s really bothering me, it’s totally out of whack.”
  • A friend might comment, “My sleep schedule is completely out of whack after pulling an all-nighter.”

25. Out of commission

This phrase is used to describe something that is temporarily or permanently not functioning or available for use. It implies that the item or person is “out” of the normal course of action or service.

  • For example, “The elevator is out of commission, we’ll have to take the stairs.”
  • In a discussion about a broken-down car, someone might say, “It’s going to be out of commission for at least a week.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t go to the gym today, my knee is out of commission.”

26. Out of action

This phrase is often used to describe something or someone that is not currently in use or unable to perform its intended function.

  • For example, “The car broke down and is currently out of action.”
  • A person might say, “I sprained my ankle, so I’ll be out of action for a few weeks.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Our star player is injured and will be out of action for the next game.”

27. Out of shape

This phrase is commonly used to describe someone who is not physically fit or does not have good physical stamina.

  • For instance, “I haven’t been exercising regularly, so I’m really out of shape.”
  • A person might say, “I need to start working out because I’m feeling really out of shape.”
  • In a fitness context, a trainer might say, “If you want to improve your endurance, you’ll need to push yourself even when you feel out of shape.”

28. Out of form

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is not performing at their usual level of skill or ability.

  • For example, “The soccer player has been out of form lately and hasn’t been scoring goals.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been sick, so I’ve been out of form at work.”
  • In a music context, a critic might say, “The singer seemed out of form during the performance and struggled with the high notes.”

29. Out of condition

This phrase is similar to “out of shape” and is commonly used to describe someone who is not physically fit or does not have good physical health.

  • For instance, “I haven’t been taking care of myself, so I’m really out of condition.”
  • A person might say, “I need to start eating healthier because I’m feeling really out of condition.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might say, “Your blood pressure is high, indicating that you’re out of condition.”

30. Out of trim

This phrase is often used to describe something that is not in its proper or balanced condition.

  • For example, “The sailboat is out of trim, causing it to veer to one side.”
  • A person might say, “My car’s alignment is off, so it’s out of trim.”
  • In a woodworking context, a carpenter might say, “The table is wobbly because one of the legs is out of trim.”

31. Out of order

This phrase is used to describe something that is not working or functioning properly.

  • For example, “The elevator is out of order, so we’ll have to take the stairs.”
  • A person might say, “My computer is out of order, I need to get it fixed.”
  • In a restaurant, a sign might say, “Sorry, our ice cream machine is out of order at the moment.”

32. Out of alignment

This term is used to describe something that is not in the correct position or arrangement.

  • For instance, “My car’s wheels are out of alignment, so it pulls to one side.”
  • A person might say, “My spine is out of alignment, I need to see a chiropractor.”
  • In a discussion about home renovations, someone might mention, “The tiles in my bathroom are out of alignment, I need to fix them.”

33. Out of sync

This expression is used to describe something that is not in proper synchronization or coordination with something else.

  • For example, “The audio and video are out of sync in this video.”
  • A person might say, “My dance moves were out of sync with the music.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might mention, “Our schedules are out of sync, we need to coordinate better.”

34. Out of tune

This phrase is used to describe something, usually music, that is not in the correct pitch or harmony.

  • For instance, “The guitar is out of tune, I need to tune the strings.”
  • A musician might say, “My voice was out of tune during the performance.”
  • In a discussion about a piano, someone might mention, “The keys are out of tune, they need to be adjusted.”

35. Out of balance

This term is used to describe something that is not in the correct state of balance or equilibrium.

  • For example, “The bike feels out of balance, I need to adjust the seat.”
  • A person might say, “My diet is out of balance, I need to eat more fruits and vegetables.”
  • In a yoga class, the instructor might say, “Make sure your body is not out of balance during this pose.”

36. Out of control

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is behaving in a chaotic or uncontrollable manner. It suggests a lack of restraint or discipline.

  • For example, “The party got out of control and the police had to be called.”
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might say, “Sometimes kids can become out of control and it’s important to set boundaries.”
  • A person describing a dangerous situation might say, “The car was spinning out of control on the icy road.”

37. Out of line

When someone is said to be “out of line,” it means they have behaved in an inappropriate or unacceptable manner. It implies a violation of social norms or boundaries.

  • For instance, “His comments were out of line and offensive.”
  • In a workplace context, someone might say, “Her behavior towards her colleagues was completely out of line.”
  • A person discussing a disrespectful action might say, “I told him his behavior was out of line and he needed to apologize.”

38. Out of place

When something or someone is described as “out of place,” it means they do not belong or fit in a particular context. It suggests a lack of harmony or suitability.

  • For example, “His loud laughter was out of place in a somber funeral.”
  • In a discussion about interior design, someone might say, “That painting looks out of place with the rest of the decor.”
  • A person describing an awkward situation might say, “I felt out of place at the fancy gala because I didn’t know anyone.”

39. Out of step

When someone or something is “out of step,” it means they are not in sync or in alignment with others. It suggests a lack of coordination or harmony.

  • For instance, “The team’s performance was out of step with their usual standards.”
  • In a discussion about a dance routine, someone might say, “She kept going out of step with the rest of the group.”
  • A person describing a disagreement might say, “We’re out of step on this issue and can’t seem to find common ground.”

40. Out of touch

When someone is described as “out of touch,” it means they are uninformed or unaware of current trends, ideas, or realities. It suggests a lack of understanding or connection.

  • For example, “He’s been out of touch with the latest technology for years.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The politician’s statements show that he’s out of touch with the concerns of everyday people.”
  • A person describing a friend’s ignorance might say, “She’s completely out of touch with what’s happening in the world.”

41. Out of reach

This phrase is used to describe something that is impossible to obtain or achieve.

  • For example, “That luxury car is out of reach for most people.”
  • A person might say, “I would love to go on a vacation, but it’s out of reach right now.”
  • In a discussion about career goals, someone might mention, “Getting that promotion seems out of reach at the moment.”

42. Out of pocket

This term is used to describe something that is temporarily unavailable or out of stock.

  • For instance, “Sorry, that item is currently out of pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I went to the store to buy my favorite snack, but it was out of pocket.”
  • In a conversation about a popular concert, someone might mention, “Tickets sold out within minutes, so they’re currently out of pocket.”

43. Down and out

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking resources.

  • For example, “After losing his job, he was down and out for a while.”
  • A person might say, “I volunteered at a homeless shelter and met many down and out individuals.”
  • In a discussion about poverty, someone might mention, “There are many causes that can lead to someone becoming down and out.”

44. Off-kilter

This term is used to describe something that is not quite right or is out of sync with what is expected.

  • For instance, “His sense of humor is a bit off-kilter.”
  • A person might say, “I had a strange dream last night, it was really off-kilter.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might mention, “The plot twists in that film were completely off-kilter.”

45. Under the table

This phrase is used to describe something that is done secretly or illegally, often involving money or transactions.

  • For example, “He paid his employees under the table to avoid taxes.”
  • A person might say, “Some people do jobs under the table to earn extra cash.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, someone might mention, “Bribes are often given under the table to avoid detection.”

46. Off the rails

This phrase is often used to describe a situation or person that has become uncontrollable or chaotic. It can also refer to something that has gone off track or deviated from the intended path.

  • For example, “The party last night was completely off the rails.”
  • A person might say, “My life feels like it’s gone off the rails lately.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might comment, “The whole thing went off the rails from the start.”

47. Off color

This term is used to describe something that is considered inappropriate or offensive. It can refer to jokes, comments, or behaviors that are not socially acceptable.

  • For instance, “I didn’t appreciate his off-color remark.”
  • A person might say, “That movie had a few off-color jokes that made me uncomfortable.”
  • In a discussion about workplace behavior, someone might mention, “We need to address any off-color comments or behavior in the office.”

48. Laid up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is unable to work or participate in normal activities due to illness or injury. It implies that the person is confined to bed or resting.

  • For example, “I’ve been laid up with the flu for the past week.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m laid up with a sprained ankle.”
  • In a discussion about recovery from surgery, someone might mention, “I’ll be laid up for a few weeks while I heal.”

49. In a bad way

This phrase is used to describe someone who is not doing well physically or emotionally. It implies that the person is experiencing difficulties or challenges.

  • For instance, “She’s been in a bad way since her breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I saw him at the party and he looked in a bad way.”
  • In a discussion about a friend’s health, someone might mention, “He’s been in a bad way lately, dealing with a chronic illness.”

50. Off sick

This term is used to describe someone who is absent from work or school due to illness. It implies that the person is not feeling well and needs to rest and recover.

  • For example, “I won’t be in the office today, I’m off sick.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been off sick for the past few days with a stomach bug.”
  • In a discussion about workplace policies, someone might mention, “We have a policy that employees must notify their supervisor when they’re off sick.”
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