Top 82 Slang For Pounds – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang for pounds, it’s easy to get lost in a sea of words. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. From quid to dosh, we’ve compiled a list of the most popular slang terms for pounds that will make you feel like a true Brit. So, whether you’re a local or just a fan of British culture, get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these catchy and quirky expressions.

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1. Quid

This is a slang term for the British pound, which is the official currency of the United Kingdom. “Quid” is often used in everyday conversation to refer to money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you 20 quid for the tickets.”
  • In a discussion about travel expenses, a person might mention, “I spent 100 quid on dinner last night.”
  • A British comedian might make a joke like, “I found a fiver in my pocket. That’s 5 quid I didn’t have before!”

2. Nicker

This is a slang term for a pound, specifically referring to one pound (£1). “Nicker” is a colloquial term often used in the United Kingdom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to borrow a nicker to buy a coffee.”
  • In a conversation about the cost of an item, a person might ask, “How much is that jacket? 50 nickers?”
  • A British friend might casually say, “I’ll pay you back the 10 nickers I owe you next week.”

3. Pony

This is a slang term for a twenty-five-pound note (£25). “Pony” is a colloquial term often used in the United Kingdom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a pony in my jacket pocket!”
  • In a discussion about cash gifts, a person might mention, “My grandma gave me a pony for my birthday.”
  • A British comedian might make a joke like, “I spent a pony on drinks last night. My wallet is feeling it today!”

4. Ton

This is a slang term for a one-hundred-pound note (£100). “Ton” is a colloquial term often used in the United Kingdom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to withdraw a ton from the bank.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, a person might ask, “How much did that TV cost? A ton?”
  • A British friend might casually say, “I owe you a ton for covering dinner last night.”

5. Monkey

This is a slang term for a five-hundred-pound note (£500). “Monkey” is a colloquial term often used in the United Kingdom.

  • For example, someone might say, “I won a monkey in a poker game.”
  • In a discussion about high-value transactions, a person might mention, “I had to pay a monkey for my car repairs.”
  • A British comedian might make a joke like, “I’d love to have a monkey in my wallet, but I’ll settle for a tenner.”

6. Grand

In British slang, “grand” is a colloquial term for £1,000. It is often used to refer to a large sum of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just won a grand in the lottery!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, one might say, “That designer handbag cost me a grand.”
  • A person discussing their savings might say, “I managed to save up five grand for my vacation.”

7. Bag

In British slang, “bag” is a term used to refer to £1,000. It is similar to the term “grand” in meaning.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got paid and I’ve got a bag in my pocket.”
  • In a discussion about a big purchase, one might say, “I dropped a bag on that new car.”
  • A person talking about their salary might say, “I make a bag a week working overtime.”

8. Bullseye

In British slang, “bullseye” is a term used to refer to £50. It originates from the design of the £50 note, which features a bullseye-like target.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a bullseye in an old jacket pocket!”
  • In a conversation about a small amount of money, one might say, “I just need a bullseye to cover my expenses.”
  • A person discussing their gambling winnings might say, “I hit the bullseye at the casino last night.”

9. Lady

In British slang, “lady” is a term used to refer to £5. It is derived from the image of Queen Elizabeth II, who appears on the £5 note.

  • For example, someone might say, “Can you lend me a lady? I forgot my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about a small purchase, one might say, “I only need a couple of ladies for these snacks.”
  • A person talking about their pocket money might say, “My parents give me a lady every week.”

10. Fiver

In British slang, “fiver” is a term used to refer to £5. It is a common and widely recognized term for this denomination.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a fiver on the street!”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, one might say, “Can you give me a fiver for your share?”
  • A person discussing a small expense might say, “I only spent a fiver on lunch today.”

11. Tenner

This is a slang term for a £10 note, which is equivalent to ten pounds. It is commonly used in informal conversations to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a tenner until payday?”
  • Someone might say, “I found a tenner on the ground, lucky me!”
  • In a discussion about prices, a person might ask, “How much does that cost? About a tenner?”

12. Score

This is a slang term for a £20 note, which is equivalent to twenty pounds. It is derived from the fact that the number 20 is often represented with a score mark (a line) in old-fashioned counting.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw a score from the ATM.”
  • A person might say, “I’m willing to pay a score for that vintage record.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent a score on lunch today.”

13. Pony and a half

This is a slang term for a £50 note, which is equivalent to fifty pounds. It is derived from the fact that the number 50 is often represented with a pony (a line) and a half in old-fashioned counting.

  • For example, “I can’t believe I lost a pony and a half at the casino.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up to buy a new phone, and I already have a pony and a half.”
  • In a discussion about expensive items, someone might ask, “How much does that luxury bag cost? A pony and a half?”

14. Bullseye and a half

This is a slang term for £150, which is equivalent to one hundred and fifty pounds. It is derived from the fact that the number 150 is often represented with a bullseye (a circle) and a half in old-fashioned counting.

  • For instance, “I spent a bullseye and a half on concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I earned a bullseye and a half from selling my old bike.”
  • In a conversation about savings goals, someone might mention, “I need to save up a bullseye and a half for my vacation.”

15. Ton and a half

This is a slang term for £100, which is equivalent to one hundred pounds. It is derived from the fact that the number 100 is often represented with a ton (a large amount) and a half in old-fashioned counting.

  • For example, “I just found a ton and a half in my jacket pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you a ton and a half for that favor.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might ask, “How much should I set aside each month? About a ton and a half?”

16. Monkey and a half

This is a slang term that refers to £500. It is believed to have originated from soldiers returning from India, where the 500 rupee note had a picture of a monkey on it.

  • For example, “I just won a monkey and a half at the casino!”
  • A person might say, “I saved up a monkey and a half to buy a new phone.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That car costs a monkey and a half!”

17. Grand and a half

This slang term is used to describe £1,500. It is an extension of the word “grand,” which is slang for £1,000.

  • For instance, “I just got a bonus of a grand and a half!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a grand and a half for my dream vacation.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of living, someone might mention, “Rent in this city is outrageous, it’s like a grand and a half a month!”

18. Bag and a half

This slang term refers to £1,500. It is believed to have originated from the phrase “bag of sand,” which is Cockney rhyming slang for a grand (i.e., £1,000).

  • For example, “I just sold my old car for a bag and a half!”
  • A person might say, “I need to earn a bag and a half to afford that designer handbag.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I managed to save up a bag and a half in just a few months!”

19. Lady and a fiver

This slang term refers to £55. It is derived from the combination of the word “lady,” which is slang for £50, and “fiver,” which is slang for £5.

  • For instance, “I just won a bet and made a lady and a fiver!”
  • A person might say, “I spent a lady and a fiver on dinner last night.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I can only afford to spend a lady and a fiver on groceries this week.”

20. Bullseye and a fiver

This slang term is used to describe £55. It is derived from the combination of the word “bullseye,” which is slang for £50, and “fiver,” which is slang for £5.

  • For example, “I just found a bullseye and a fiver in my old jacket pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I need a bullseye and a fiver to buy that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about winning a bet, someone might mention, “I bet on the winning horse and walked away with a bullseye and a fiver!”

21. Monkey and a fiver

This slang term refers to a sum of £500. The term “monkey” is a British slang for £500, and “fiver” is a slang term for £5.

  • For example, “I owe you a monkey and a fiver for that bet.”
  • In a conversation about buying concert tickets, someone might say, “I managed to snag two tickets for only a monkey and a fiver.”
  • A person discussing a large purchase might mention, “I had to shell out a monkey and a fiver for that new gadget.”

22. Grand and a fiver

This slang term refers to a sum of £1,005. The term “grand” is a common slang for £1,000, and “fiver” represents £5.

  • For instance, “I saved up a grand and a fiver to buy that new laptop.”
  • In a conversation about a winning lottery ticket, someone might say, “I just won a grand and a fiver!”
  • A person discussing a recent bonus at work might mention, “I received a grand and a fiver as a bonus this year.”

23. Bag and a fiver

This slang term refers to a sum of £5,000. The term “bag” is a British slang for £1,000, and “fiver” represents £5.

  • For example, “I need to save up a bag and a fiver for that vacation.”
  • In a conversation about a large expense, someone might say, “It cost me a bag and a fiver to fix my car.”
  • A person discussing their savings goal might mention, “I’m aiming to have a bag and a fiver in my bank account by next year.”

24. Bullseye and a tenner

This slang term refers to a sum of £100. The term “bullseye” is a British slang for £50, and “tenner” represents £10.

  • For instance, “I owe you a bullseye and a tenner for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about a small cash prize, someone might say, “I won a bullseye and a tenner in a raffle.”
  • A person discussing the cost of a night out might mention, “I spent a bullseye and a tenner on drinks last night.”

25. Monkey and a tenner

This slang term refers to a sum of £1,010. The term “monkey” is a British slang for £500, and “tenner” represents £10.

  • For example, “I need to borrow a monkey and a tenner to pay my rent.”
  • In a conversation about a recent shopping spree, someone might say, “I spent a monkey and a tenner on clothes.”
  • A person discussing a high-priced item might mention, “I managed to negotiate the price down to a monkey and a tenner.”

26. Grand and a tenner

This phrase is a slang term for £1,010, combining the word “grand” which refers to £1,000 and “tenner” which refers to £10. It is often used informally to describe a sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a grand and a tenner in the lottery!”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might say, “I paid a grand and a tenner for that new phone.”
  • A person discussing a large bill might exclaim, “I can’t believe I owe a grand and a tenner for that car repair!”

27. Bag and a tenner

This phrase is another slang term for £1,010, combining the word “bag” which refers to £1,000 and “tenner” which refers to £10. It is a casual way to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just saved up a bag and a tenner for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about a costly purchase, one might say, “I spent a bag and a tenner on that designer handbag.”
  • A person discussing a significant expense might comment, “It cost me a bag and a tenner to fix my car.”

28. Bullseye and a score

This phrase is a slang term for £20, combining the word “bullseye” which refers to £20 and “score” which also refers to £20. It is a playful way to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a bullseye and a score in my pocket!”
  • In a conversation about a small debt, one might say, “Can you lend me a bullseye and a score until payday?”
  • A person discussing a quick and easy payment might say, “I can give you a bullseye and a score for that task.”

29. Monkey and a score

This phrase is a slang term for £60, combining the word “monkey” which refers to £500 and “score” which refers to £20. It is a casual way to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a monkey and a score selling my old phone.”
  • In a conversation about splitting expenses, one might say, “We each owe a monkey and a score for the hotel.”
  • A person discussing a significant purchase might comment, “It cost me a monkey and a score to buy that concert ticket.”

30. Grand and a score

This phrase is a slang term for £1,020, combining the word “grand” which refers to £1,000 and “score” which refers to £20. It is an informal way to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got paid a grand and a score for that freelance project!”
  • In a conversation about a large bill, one might say, “I owe a grand and a score for my rent.”
  • A person discussing a significant expense might comment, “It cost me a grand and a score to fix my car.”

31. Bag and a score

This slang term refers to a sum of money equal to twenty pounds. It combines “bag” which is a common slang term for money, and “score” which is a term for twenty.

  • For example, “I just found a bag and a score under my mattress!”
  • A person might say, “I owe you a bag and a score for that favor.”
  • In a conversation about a purchase, someone might ask, “How much for that bag and a score?”

32. Bullseye and a pony

This slang term refers to a sum of money equal to fifty pounds. It combines “bullseye” which is a slang term for fifty pounds, and “pony” which is a term for twenty-five.

  • For instance, “I need to borrow a bullseye and a pony to pay my rent.”
  • A person might say, “I spent a bullseye and a pony on those concert tickets.”
  • In a discussion about a bet, someone might ask, “Are you willing to put down a bullseye and a pony?”

33. Monkey and a pony

This slang term refers to a sum of money equal to five hundred pounds. It combines “monkey” which is a slang term for five hundred pounds, and “pony” which is a term for twenty-five.

  • For example, “I just won a monkey and a pony in the lottery!”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up to buy a car, I already have a monkey and a pony.”
  • In a conversation about a loan, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a monkey and a pony?”

34. Grand and a pony

This slang term refers to a sum of money equal to one thousand and twenty-five pounds. It combines “grand” which is a slang term for one thousand pounds, and “pony” which is a term for twenty-five.

  • For instance, “That new TV cost me a grand and a pony.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a grand and a pony before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about a salary, someone might mention, “I make a grand and a pony a month.”

35. Bag and a pony

This slang term refers to a sum of money equal to twenty-five pounds. It combines “bag” which is a common slang term for money, and “pony” which is a term for twenty-five.

  • For example, “I just found a bag and a pony in my jacket pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I spent a bag and a pony on those new shoes.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, someone might ask, “Can you spot me a bag and a pony?”

36. Bullseye and a ton

This slang term refers to £100. The word “bullseye” is often used to represent the number 100, and “ton” is a slang term for £100.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a bullseye and a ton at the casino!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a bullseye and a ton?”
  • A person discussing a large purchase might say, “I spent a bullseye and a ton on this new smartphone.”

37. Monkey and a ton

This slang term refers to £500. The word “monkey” is often used to represent the number 500, and “ton” is a slang term for £100.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I saved up a monkey and a ton to buy this designer handbag.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might ask, “How much did you spend? A monkey and a ton?”
  • A person bragging about their earnings might say, “I made a monkey and a ton in just one week!”

38. Grand and a ton

This slang term refers to £1,100. The word “grand” is often used to represent the number 1,000, and “ton” is a slang term for £100.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just paid a grand and a ton for this new laptop.”
  • In a conversation about expensive bills, someone might ask, “How much was your car repair? A grand and a ton?”
  • A person discussing their savings might say, “I have a grand and a ton in my emergency fund.”

39. Bag and a ton

This slang term refers to £1,200. The word “bag” is often used to represent the number 1,000, and “ton” is a slang term for £100.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just spent a bag and a ton on this vacation.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might ask, “How much did you spend? A bag and a ton?”
  • A person talking about their salary might say, “I make a bag and a ton every month.”

40. Bullseye and a monkey

This slang term refers to £500. The word “bullseye” is often used to represent the number 100, and “monkey” is a slang term for £500.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a bullseye and a monkey in the lottery!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a bullseye and a monkey?”
  • A person discussing their savings might say, “I have a bullseye and a monkey in my piggy bank.”

41. Monkey and a monkey

This term refers to a sum of £5000. It is derived from the phrase “monkey” which is slang for £500 and “a monkey” which means 5 times that amount.

  • For example, “He just won a monkey and a monkey in the lottery!”
  • In a discussion about a large sum of money, someone might say, “I wish I had a monkey and a monkey in my bank account.”
  • A person might brag, “I saved up and bought a new car with a monkey and a monkey.”

42. Grand and a monkey

This term refers to a sum of £1500. It is derived from the phrase “grand” which is slang for £1000 and “a monkey” which means 5 times that amount.

  • For instance, “He spent a grand and a monkey on that designer handbag.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I paid a grand and a monkey for my rent this month.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe I lost a grand and a monkey at the casino.”

43. Bag and a monkey

This term refers to a sum of £500. It is derived from the phrase “bag” which is slang for £100 and “a monkey” which means 5 times that amount.

  • For example, “He owed me a bag and a monkey but still hasn’t paid.”
  • In a discussion about a small loan, someone might say, “Can you lend me a bag and a monkey until payday?”
  • A person might boast, “I made a bag and a monkey selling my old clothes online.”

44. Bullseye and a grand

This term refers to a sum of £1000. It is derived from the phrase “bullseye” which is slang for £100 and “a grand” which means £1000.

  • For instance, “He won a bullseye and a grand in the poker game.”
  • In a conversation about a large purchase, someone might say, “I just spent a bullseye and a grand on a new computer.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe I found a bullseye and a grand in my jacket pocket!”

45. Monkey and a grand

This term refers to a sum of £6000. It is derived from the phrase “monkey” which is slang for £500 and “a grand” which means £1000.

  • For example, “She saved up a monkey and a grand to go on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about a significant amount of money, someone might say, “I just paid a monkey and a grand for my tuition.”
  • A person might brag, “I earned a monkey and a grand in a week of overtime.”

46. Grand and a grand

This slang term refers to a sum of £1,000. It is often used to describe a large amount of money.

  • For example, “He just won a grand and a grand in the lottery!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might say, “That designer handbag cost me a grand and a grand.”
  • A person discussing their savings might mention, “I managed to save up a grand and a grand for my vacation.”

47. Bag and a grand

Similar to “grand and a grand,” this slang term also refers to a sum of £1,000. It is commonly used in the same context to describe a significant amount of money.

  • For instance, “She made a bag and a grand from selling her artwork.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, someone might say, “They made a bag and a grand in just one week.”
  • A person talking about their salary might mention, “I earn a bag and a grand every month.”

48. Bullseye and a bag

This slang term is used to describe a sum of £50. It is derived from the game of darts, where hitting the bullseye is considered a high-scoring achievement.

  • For example, “I found a bullseye and a bag in my jacket pocket!”
  • In a conversation about a small debt, someone might say, “I owe him a bullseye and a bag.”
  • A person discussing the cost of a night out might mention, “We spent a bullseye and a bag on drinks and food.”

49. Monkey and a bag

This slang term refers to a sum of £500. The origin of this term is unclear, but it is commonly used in British slang.

  • For instance, “He lent me a monkey and a bag to cover my rent.”
  • In a discussion about a purchase, someone might say, “I got this new phone for a monkey and a bag.”
  • A person talking about a loan might mention, “I borrowed a monkey and a bag from my friend to start my business.”

50. Bean

This slang term is used to describe a sum of £1. It is a common term in British slang, often used in the context of small amounts of money.

  • For example, “I found a bean on the street!”
  • In a conversation about the cost of a cup of coffee, someone might say, “It’s just a bean.”
  • A person discussing pocket change might mention, “I only have a few beans in my wallet.”

51. Bar

In British slang, “bar” is used to refer to a pound sterling, which is equivalent to 100 pence. This term originated from the practice of marking a bar on a tally stick to represent a pound.

  • For example, “I owe you 20 bars for that favor.”
  • A person might say, “I spent 50 bars on this new jacket.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “Rent for this flat is 500 bars a month.”

52. Lady Godiva

“Lady Godiva” is a slang term used to refer to a £5 note. It is named after the English noblewoman who famously rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest against her husband’s oppressive taxes.

  • For instance, “I only have a Lady Godiva in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need some change for this Lady Godiva.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might mention, “I withdrew a couple of Lady Godivas from the ATM.”

53. Cockle

In British slang, “cockle” is used to refer to a £10 note. The term is derived from the resemblance of the number 10 to a cockle shell.

  • For example, “I found a few cockles in my pocket.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a cockle until payday?”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent 50 cockles on groceries this week.”

54. Macaroni

“Macaroni” is a slang term used to refer to a £25 note. The term is derived from the Italian dish macaroni, which was considered a luxury food in the 18th century.

  • For instance, “I need to break a macaroni for this purchase.”
  • A person might say, “I found a couple of macaronis in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I managed to save 100 macaronis this month.”

55. Carpet

In British slang, “carpet” is used to refer to a £100 note. The term originated from the cockney rhyming slang “carpet bag,” which rhymes with “rag,” meaning £100.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw a carpet from the bank.”
  • A person might say, “I found a carpet in an old jacket.”
  • In a conversation about large expenses, someone might mention, “I spent a couple of carpets on that vacation.”

56. Double carpet

This slang term refers to the amount of two hundred pounds. It is derived from the rhyming slang “carpet” for “two hundred.”

  • For example, “I just won a double carpet at the casino!”
  • A person might say, “I owe you a double carpet for that favor.”
  • In a conversation about a large purchase, someone might mention, “It cost me a double carpet, but it was worth it.”

57. Monkey nuts

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, typically less than one pound. It is derived from the fact that monkey nuts (peanuts) are small and relatively inexpensive.

  • For instance, “I only have a few monkey nuts left in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I spent all my money on this, now I’m left with monkey nuts.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I need to save every monkey nut I can.”

58. Pony and trap

This slang term refers to the amount of fifty pounds. It is derived from the rhyming slang “pony and trap” for “crap,” which is used to describe something of poor quality or rubbish.

  • For example, “I lost a pony and trap on that bet.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I paid a pony and trap for this broken phone.”
  • In a conversation about expensive items, someone might mention, “That designer handbag costs a pony and trap!”

59. Bullion

This slang term refers to the amount of one million pounds. It is derived from the fact that bullion refers to gold or silver bars, which are often associated with wealth and value.

  • For instance, “He made a fortune and now he’s sitting on a pile of bullion.”
  • A person might say, “I’d love to win the lottery and have a bullion in my bank account.”
  • In a discussion about extravagant purchases, someone might mention, “That mansion costs a bullion!”

60. Quidsworth

This slang term refers to something that is worth one pound. It is derived from the combination of the word “quid,” which is a colloquial term for a pound, and the suffix “-sworth,” which indicates value.

  • For example, “I found a quidsworth on the street.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you a quidsworth for that candy bar.”
  • In a conversation about affordable items, someone might mention, “You can buy a quidsworth of snacks at the vending machine.”

61. Nickerbocker glory

This term is Cockney rhyming slang for “story,” which in turn is slang for £1,000. It is often used in reference to a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a nickerbocker glory at the casino!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That car cost me a nickerbocker glory.”
  • A person discussing their savings might say, “I’ve managed to save up a nickerbocker glory for my vacation.”

62. Ton of bricks

This slang term refers to £100. It is derived from the phrase “hit someone like a ton of bricks,” which means to have a sudden and significant impact.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just got paid, and I’ve got a ton of bricks in my pocket!”
  • In a conversation about the cost of something, someone might mention, “That concert ticket set me back a ton of bricks.”
  • A person discussing their budget might say, “I can only spend a ton of bricks on groceries this week.”

63. Grand slam

This term is slang for £1,000. It is derived from the game of baseball, where a grand slam refers to a home run hit with all bases occupied, resulting in four runs.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a grand slam at the casino!”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I’m trying to set aside a grand slam each month.”
  • A person discussing their salary might say, “I make a grand slam every week.”

64. Bag of sand

This term is Cockney rhyming slang for “grand,” which in turn is slang for £1,000. It is often used to refer to a large sum of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just won a bag of sand at the horse races!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That watch cost me a bag of sand.”
  • A person discussing their savings might say, “I’ve managed to save up a bag of sand for emergencies.”

65. Carpet bagger

This term is slang for £1,000. It is derived from the historical term “carpetbagger,” which referred to opportunistic Northerners who moved to the South after the American Civil War to take advantage of the chaotic and unstable situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a carpet bagger at the poker game!”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m trying to save up a carpet bagger for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person discussing their income might say, “I make a carpet bagger every week.”

66. Deep sea diver

This slang term refers to a five-pound note in British currency. It is derived from the fact that the design on the five-pound note features a portrait of the Queen wearing a crown, which resembles a deep sea diver’s helmet.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a deep sea diver for lunch?”
  • A person might say, “I found a deep sea diver in my pocket, lucky me!”
  • If someone owes you money, you might ask, “Do you have a deep sea diver to pay me back?”

67. Cock and hen

This slang term is used to describe a ten-pound note in British currency. It is derived from Cockney rhyming slang, where “hen” rhymes with “ten”.

  • For instance, “Can you break a cock and hen for me?”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw a cock and hen from the bank.”
  • If someone owes you ten pounds, you might ask, “Do you have a cock and hen to pay me back?”

68. Uncle Ben

This slang term refers to a twenty-pound note in British currency. It is derived from the image of a famous person named Benjamin Franklin, who appears on the twenty-dollar bill in the United States. The term “Uncle Ben” is used to refer to the twenty-pound note due to the similarity in appearance between the two notes.

  • For example, “I found an Uncle Ben in my wallet!”
  • A person might say, “I need to exchange my Uncle Ben for smaller denominations.”
  • If someone owes you twenty pounds, you might ask, “Do you have an Uncle Ben to pay me back?”

69. Speckled hen

This slang term is used to describe a fifty-pound note in British currency. It is derived from the image of a famous person named Sir Christopher Wren, who appears on the fifty-pound note. Wren is known for designing many of the iconic buildings in London, including St. Paul’s Cathedral, which features a speckled pattern on its dome.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw a speckled hen from the bank.”
  • A person might say, “I found a speckled hen in my coat pocket!”
  • If someone owes you fifty pounds, you might ask, “Do you have a speckled hen to pay me back?”

70. Nelson

This slang term refers to a one-hundred-pound note in British currency. It is derived from the image of Admiral Lord Nelson, who appears on the back of the note. Nelson is a famous British naval officer, known for his leadership during the Napoleonic Wars.

  • For example, “I need to break a Nelson for smaller denominations.”
  • A person might say, “I found a Nelson in my piggy bank!”
  • If someone owes you one hundred pounds, you might ask, “Do you have a Nelson to pay me back?”

71. Twenny

This term is used to refer to a twenty-pound note in British currency. It is a slang term commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a twenny until payday?”
  • A person might say, “I found a twenny on the street!”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save at least a twenny a week.”

72. Fifty quid

This phrase is used to refer to a fifty-pound note in British currency. “Quid” is a slang term for pounds, and “fifty” indicates the amount.

  • For instance, “I spent fifty quid on a new pair of shoes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me fifty quid until next week?”
  • In a conversation about the cost of living, someone might mention, “Rent in the city is at least fifty quid a week.”

73. Ton up

This term is used to refer to one hundred pounds in British currency. It is a slang term commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For example, “He owed me a ton up, and finally paid me back.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve saved up a ton up for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “I spent a ton up on a new laptop.”

74. Pony up

This phrase is used to refer to twenty-five pounds in British currency. “Pony” is a slang term for twenty-five, and “up” indicates the amount.

  • For instance, “You owe me a pony up for the concert tickets.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you pony up for your share of the bill?”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save a pony up every month.”

75. Big ones

This phrase is used to refer to pounds in British currency. “Big ones” is a colloquial term often used to describe an amount of money.

  • For example, “I need to save up some big ones for a new car.”
  • A person might say, “I spent all my big ones on a shopping spree.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “My aim is to have a million big ones in my bank account.”

76. Smackers

This is a slang term for pounds or money in general. It is often used to refer to a large sum of money.

  • For example, “He just won a huge jackpot and now he’s got loads of smackers.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up some smackers for a vacation.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I had enough smackers to buy a mansion.”

77. Quids in

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a financially advantageous position or has made a profit.

  • For instance, “After winning the lottery, he was definitely quids in.”
  • In a discussion about business ventures, someone might say, “If this deal goes through, we’ll be quids in.”
  • A person might comment, “I worked hard and now I’m finally quids in.”

78. Cashola

This is a playful slang term for money, emphasizing the cash aspect.

  • For example, “I need to hit the ATM and get some cashola.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’m a bit short on cashola this month.”
  • A person might comment, “I found some extra cashola in my pocket.”

79. Dough

This slang term for pounds or money is derived from the idea that money is like dough that can be kneaded and shaped.

  • For instance, “He just got a raise and now he’s rolling in dough.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up some dough for a down payment.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I could just make some dough appear out of thin air.”

80. Bread

This is a slang term for pounds or money, with the idea that money is a staple or essential part of life.

  • For example, “He’s always looking for ways to make more bread.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to earn some extra bread to pay off my debts.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m going to work overtime and make some serious bread.”

81. Scratch

This term refers to cash or money in general. It is often used to describe a significant amount of money.

  • For example, “He’s got a lot of scratch in his pocket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up some scratch before I can go on vacation.”
  • A person might boast, “I just made a big score and now I’m rolling in scratch.”

82. Wad

This slang term is used to describe a large amount of money, usually in the form of bills folded or rolled together.

  • For instance, “He pulled a wad of cash out of his pocket.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, someone might say, “They made a wad of money from that deal.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I found a wad of cash on the street! Lucky me!”
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