Top 55 Slang For Practices – Meaning & Usage

Practices are an integral part of various communities, each with its own set of slang that adds a unique flavor to the experience. Whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting out, understanding the lingo can make all the difference. Join us as we uncover some of the most popular slang terms for practices that will have you feeling like a true insider in no time. Get ready to level up your knowledge and dive into the world of specialized jargon!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Grind

Refers to putting in a lot of effort and dedication towards a task or goal. It often implies long hours and persistence.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to grind all night to finish this research paper.”
  • A professional athlete might mention, “Success in sports requires a lot of grind and sacrifice.”
  • A gamer might say, “I’ve been grinding this game for hours to level up my character.”

2. Reps

Short for repetitions, it refers to the number of times an exercise or movement is performed. It is commonly used in fitness and weightlifting contexts.

  • For instance, a personal trainer might say, “Do three sets of 10 reps for this exercise.”
  • A weightlifter might mention, “I’m focusing on increasing my reps for squats.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might say, “I did 50 reps of push-ups today.”

3. Drill

Refers to a practice exercise or routine that is repeated to improve a specific skill or technique. It is commonly used in sports and military contexts.

  • For example, a basketball coach might say, “Let’s do some shooting drills to improve our accuracy.”
  • A military instructor might mention, “We need to practice drill movements to ensure precision and coordination.”
  • A musician might say, “I’ve been doing scales and drills to improve my finger dexterity.”

4. Run-through

Refers to a rehearsal or practice session where the entire performance or routine is practiced from start to finish. It is commonly used in theater, dance, and music contexts.

  • For instance, a theater director might say, “Let’s do a run-through of the play to iron out any issues.”
  • A dance choreographer might mention, “We need to do multiple run-throughs of the routine to ensure everyone is in sync.”
  • A band member might say, “We have a run-through scheduled before the concert to make sure everything flows smoothly.”

5. Warm-up

Refers to a set of exercises or activities performed before engaging in a more intense physical activity. It helps to prepare the body for the upcoming exertion.

  • For example, a fitness instructor might say, “Let’s start with a 10-minute warm-up before the workout.”
  • An athlete might mention, “I always do a warm-up routine before running to prevent injuries.”
  • A dancer might say, “We do a series of stretches as part of our warm-up routine to improve flexibility.”

6. Rehearse

This refers to the act of repeating or practicing something in order to improve or prepare for a performance or event. It is commonly used in the context of performing arts or music.

  • For example, a theater actor might say, “I need to rehearse my lines before the show tonight.”
  • A musician might say, “Let’s rehearse this song one more time before the concert.”
  • In a dance class, the instructor might say, “We will now rehearse the choreography for the upcoming recital.”

7. Jam

In the context of music, “jamming” refers to playing music in an improvised or spontaneous manner, often in a group setting. It is a way for musicians to explore new ideas and create music on the spot.

  • For instance, a group of friends might gather in a garage and say, “Let’s jam and see what we come up with.”
  • At a music festival, a band might invite other musicians on stage to jam together.
  • A guitarist might say, “I love jamming with other musicians because it allows for creative freedom.”

8. Woodshed

This term is often used in the context of music and refers to practicing or studying intensely. It implies a dedicated and focused approach to improving one’s skills.

  • For example, a music teacher might tell a student, “You need to spend some time in the woodshed to master that difficult piece.”
  • A musician might say, “I’m going to the woodshed to work on my technique.”
  • In a conversation about skill development, someone might say, “You have to put in the hours in the woodshed if you want to excel.”

9. Sweat session

This term is used to describe a physically demanding or intense practice session. It implies hard work, effort, and dedication.

  • For instance, a personal trainer might say, “Get ready for a sweat session. We’re going to push your limits.”
  • An athlete might say, “I had a great sweat session at the gym today.”
  • In a fitness class, the instructor might say, “Let’s start the sweat session with some high-intensity interval training.”

10. Polish

In the context of practices, “polish” refers to the act of refining or perfecting something through practice or repetition. It is often used to describe the final stages of preparation.

  • For example, a public speaker might say, “I need to polish my presentation before the conference.”
  • A writer might say, “I’m working on polishing the final draft of my novel.”
  • In a dance rehearsal, the choreographer might say, “Let’s polish the transitions between the movements.”

11. Iron out

To “iron out” means to resolve or fix a problem or issue. It is often used in the context of finding a solution or smoothing out difficulties.

  • For example, “We need to iron out the details before we can proceed with the project.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s iron out any misunderstandings before we move forward.”
  • A manager might ask, “Can you help us iron out this scheduling conflict?”

12. Tune-up

A “tune-up” refers to the act of improving or adjusting something, usually to make it work better or more efficiently.

  • For instance, “I need to give my car a tune-up before our road trip.”
  • A computer technician might say, “I’ll perform a tune-up on your laptop to optimize its performance.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We’ll focus on individual skills during today’s practice to give everyone a tune-up.”

13. Repeatedly

“Repeatedly” means to do something over and over again, often with a certain frequency or regularity.

  • For example, “He repeatedly asked for a raise, but his request was denied.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’ve reminded the students repeatedly to turn in their assignments on time.”
  • In a customer service scenario, an employee might apologize, “I’m sorry for the inconvenience. We’ve repeatedly had issues with our online payment system.”

14. Fine-tune

To “fine-tune” means to make small adjustments to improve or optimize something, often to achieve a desired outcome or result.

  • For instance, “I need to fine-tune my presentation before the big meeting.”
  • A musician might say, “I spent hours fine-tuning the melody to make it more catchy.”
  • In a cooking context, a chef might say, “I’ll fine-tune the recipe to balance the flavors.”

15. Perfect

To “perfect” means to make something flawless or without faults. It often implies achieving a high level of excellence or precision.

  • For example, “She spent years perfecting her painting technique.”
  • A student might say, “I need to perfect my essay before submitting it for grading.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We’ll focus on perfecting our defensive strategy in today’s practice.”

16. Hone

To refine or improve a skill or ability through practice and repetition. “Hone” suggests a deliberate and focused effort to become better at something.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I need to hone my guitar skills before the concert.”
  • A writer might comment, “I spend hours honing my writing craft every day.”
  • A basketball player might say, “I’m heading to the gym to hone my jump shot.”

17. Grindstone

Refers to the act of putting in consistent and diligent effort towards a particular goal or task. “Grindstone” emphasizes the idea of hard work and perseverance.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’ve been hitting the grindstone to prepare for my exams.”
  • A businessperson might comment, “Success in entrepreneurship requires keeping your nose to the grindstone.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s get out there and put our noses to the grindstone!”

18. Session

A specific period of time dedicated to a particular activity or task. “Session” implies a concentrated and uninterrupted period of work or practice.

  • For example, a therapist might say, “Let’s schedule a therapy session to discuss your concerns.”
  • A musician might say, “I have a recording session later today to work on my new album.”
  • A gamer might say, “I’m having a gaming session with my friends this evening.”

19. Run

To engage in a particular activity or task repeatedly. “Run” suggests a continuous and repetitive practice or performance.

  • For instance, a dancer might say, “I need to run through my routine a few more times before the show.”
  • A chef might comment, “I’ve been running this recipe in my restaurant for years.”
  • A basketball player might say, “We need to run more plays to improve our teamwork.”

20. Work on

To dedicate time and effort towards improving or developing a particular skill or aspect. “Work on” implies actively focusing on an area of practice or improvement.

  • For example, an artist might say, “I need to work on my shading techniques to enhance my drawings.”
  • A writer might comment, “I’m currently working on developing my character arcs in this novel.”
  • A student might say, “I need to work on my time management skills to be more productive.”

21. Brush up

This term is used when someone wants to review or refresh their knowledge or skills on a particular topic or activity. It implies the act of going over something again to improve or maintain proficiency.

  • For example, “I need to brush up on my Spanish before my trip to Mexico.”
  • A student might say, “I have an exam next week, so I need to brush up on my math skills.”
  • Someone preparing for a job interview might say, “I’m going to brush up on my interview skills by practicing with a friend.”

22. Drill down

This phrase is used when someone wants to explore a topic or subject in more detail. It suggests the act of going beyond surface-level understanding and gaining a deeper level of knowledge or insight.

  • For instance, “We need to drill down into the data to find the root cause of the issue.”
  • A researcher might say, “I’m going to drill down into this topic to uncover new findings.”
  • A manager might ask their team, “Let’s drill down into the project plan to identify potential risks and challenges.”

23. Practice makes perfect

This saying emphasizes the importance of consistent practice in order to achieve perfection or mastery in a particular skill or activity. It suggests that the more one practices, the better they become.

  • For example, “If you want to become a skilled pianist, remember that practice makes perfect.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Keep practicing, because practice makes perfect.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “Don’t give up! Remember, practice makes perfect.”

24. Get in reps

This phrase is often used in the context of physical fitness or sports, referring to the act of performing repetitive exercises or movements to improve strength, skill, or technique.

  • For instance, “I need to get in reps at the gym to build muscle.”
  • A basketball player might say, “I’m going to the court to get in some shooting reps.”
  • A fitness instructor might encourage their class, “Let’s get in some reps and push ourselves to improve.”

25. Dial in

This slang term is used when someone wants to concentrate or improve their performance in a specific area. It implies the act of adjusting or fine-tuning one’s skills or actions to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, “I need to dial in my presentation skills before the big meeting.”
  • A musician might say, “I’m going to dial in my guitar playing for the upcoming concert.”
  • A golfer might comment, “I need to dial in my putting technique to improve my score.”

26. Fine-tune your skills

This phrase means to make small adjustments or improvements to your skills in order to reach a higher level of proficiency.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I need to fine-tune my guitar playing before the concert.”
  • A basketball player might say, “I’ve been practicing my jump shot for hours to fine-tune my shooting skills.”
  • A chef might say, “To become a better cook, I need to fine-tune my knife skills.”

27. Put the hours in

This phrase means to invest a significant amount of time and effort into practicing or working on a particular skill or task.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to put the hours in if I want to pass the exam.”
  • A dancer might say, “I’ve been putting the hours in at the studio to perfect my technique.”
  • A writer might say, “To improve my writing, I need to put the hours in and practice every day.”

28. Perfect your craft

This phrase means to continuously work on and improve your abilities in a particular field or profession.

  • For example, a painter might say, “I strive to perfect my craft with each new artwork.”
  • A chef might say, “To become a great chef, you have to perfect your craft in the kitchen.”
  • A musician might say, “I spend hours practicing every day to perfect my craft as a pianist.”

29. Work the muscle memory

This phrase refers to the process of training your muscles to perform certain actions automatically, without conscious thought.

  • For instance, a tennis player might say, “I need to work the muscle memory for my backhand stroke.”
  • A martial artist might say, “To execute a perfect kick, you have to work the muscle memory through repetition.”
  • A dancer might say, “Working the muscle memory is crucial for remembering complex choreography.”

30. Drill it into your head

This phrase means to repeat something over and over again in order to firmly remember or understand it.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I’m going to drill this equation into your head until you can solve it in your sleep.”
  • A coach might say, “We need to drill these plays into our heads so that they become second nature.”
  • A language learner might say, “I’m drilling vocabulary words into my head to improve my fluency.”

31. Practice with purpose

This term refers to practicing with a specific goal or objective in mind. It emphasizes the importance of being intentional and deliberate in one’s practice sessions.

  • For example, a basketball coach might tell their players, “Make sure you’re practicing with purpose. Focus on improving your shooting accuracy.”
  • A musician might say, “I always practice with purpose. I set specific goals for each practice session.”
  • A student preparing for a test might advise, “Don’t just mindlessly study. Practice with purpose by targeting your weak areas.”

32. Get your reps in

This phrase is used to encourage someone to repeatedly perform a specific action or exercise in order to improve their skills or proficiency.

  • For instance, a fitness trainer might say, “Make sure you get your reps in during this workout. It’s the key to building strength.”
  • A coach might tell a baseball player, “Keep practicing your swing. Get your reps in every day to improve your batting.”
  • A teacher might advise a student, “If you want to improve your writing, you need to get your reps in. Write every day.”

33. Work on your game

This slang phrase is commonly used in sports to encourage athletes to focus on improving their skills and overall performance.

  • For example, a basketball coach might say, “You need to work on your game if you want to make the team.”
  • A golfer might tell their friend, “I’ve been working on my game a lot lately, and I’ve seen a noticeable improvement.”
  • A soccer player might advise a teammate, “If you want to play at a higher level, you need to work on your game during the off-season.”

34. Practice until it’s second nature

This phrase emphasizes the importance of practicing a skill or task repeatedly until it becomes so familiar that it can be performed without conscious effort.

  • For instance, a dancer might say, “I’ve practiced that routine so many times, it’s second nature to me now.”
  • A musician might advise a fellow musician, “Keep practicing that song until it’s second nature. You want to be able to play it without even thinking.”
  • A chef might tell a cooking apprentice, “Keep practicing those knife skills until they’re second nature. It will make your job much easier.”

35. Put the time in

This phrase emphasizes the importance of dedicating a significant amount of time and effort to practice in order to achieve improvement or mastery in a particular skill or activity.

  • For example, a coach might say, “If you want to get better, you have to put the time in. Practice every day.”
  • A musician might advise a beginner, “Don’t expect to become a great player overnight. You have to put the time in and practice consistently.”
  • A writer might tell an aspiring author, “If you want to improve your writing, you have to put the time in. Set aside dedicated time each day to write and hone your skills.”

36. Cram

Cramming refers to the act of studying intensively in a short period of time, usually right before an exam or test.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to cram for my biology test tomorrow.”
  • Another student might ask, “Are you cramming for the math final too?”
  • A friend might offer advice, “If you’re going to cram, make sure to take breaks and stay focused.”

37. Grasp

To grasp something means to understand or comprehend it.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I want to make sure all the students grasp the concept before moving on.”
  • A student might ask, “Can you explain that again? I’m not grasping it.”
  • A friend might say, “Once you grasp the basics, the rest will be easier to learn.”

38. Get the hang of

To get the hang of something means to become proficient or skilled at it.

  • For example, a new employee might say, “I’m still trying to get the hang of using the new software.”
  • A friend might encourage, “Keep practicing, and you’ll get the hang of playing the guitar.”
  • A teacher might reassure a student, “It takes time to get the hang of solving these types of equations.”

39. Skill sesh

A skill sesh is a slang term for a skill session, which is a dedicated time for practicing and improving a specific skill.

  • For instance, a basketball player might say, “I’m going to the gym for a skill sesh to work on my shooting.”
  • A musician might invite others, “Join me for a skill sesh on piano this weekend.”
  • A coach might schedule regular skill seshes for the team to improve their performance.
See also  Top 84 Slang For Communities – Meaning & Usage

40. Rehearsal

A rehearsal is a practice session for a performance, typically in the context of music, theater, or dance.

  • For example, a theater director might say, “We have a rehearsal tonight to run through the entire play.”
  • A musician might say, “We need to have a rehearsal before the concert to iron out any issues.”
  • A dancer might ask, “Are we having a rehearsal tomorrow for the upcoming performance?”

41. Workout

A workout refers to a session of physical exercise or training, often with the goal of improving fitness or strength. Workouts can vary in intensity and duration, and can focus on different muscle groups or overall fitness.

  • For example, “I’m going to the gym for a workout after work.”
  • Someone might say, “I had a great workout today, I really pushed myself.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might share, “Here’s my favorite workout routine for building muscle.”

42. Repping

Repping is a term commonly used in weightlifting or strength training to refer to performing a repetition of an exercise. It can also be used more broadly to describe repeating any type of physical activity or practice.

  • For instance, “I’m repping out some squats at the gym.”
  • A trainer might say, “Focus on your form and do 10 solid reps.”
  • Someone might ask, “How many reps are you doing for each set?”

43. Woodshedding

Woodshedding is a slang term used to describe intense and focused practice or rehearsal. It often implies spending a significant amount of time and effort on honing skills or mastering a particular technique.

  • For example, “I’ve been woodshedding my guitar playing for hours every day.”
  • A musician might say, “I’m going to lock myself in the practice room and do some serious woodshedding.”
  • Someone might ask, “How long have you been woodshedding that piece?”

44. Dress rehearsal

A dress rehearsal is a full-scale practice or run-through of a performance or event, typically done with all the necessary costumes, props, and technical elements. It is often the final practice before the actual performance, allowing participants to simulate the real conditions and identify any issues.

  • For instance, “We’re having a dress rehearsal for the play tomorrow.”
  • A theater director might say, “The dress rehearsal is crucial for ironing out any last-minute problems.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do we need to wear our costumes for the dress rehearsal?”

45. Scrimmage

A scrimmage is a practice session in which teams or individuals compete against each other in a simulated game-like environment. It is often used in team sports to test strategies, evaluate players, and practice game situations.

  • For example, “We had a scrimmage against the junior varsity team.”
  • A coach might say, “The scrimmage will help us identify areas for improvement.”
  • Someone might ask, “Who won the scrimmage?”

46. Run down

This phrase is often used when someone wants to give a brief overview or summary of a topic.

  • For example, in a meeting, a colleague might say, “Let me run down the main points of the presentation.”
  • When discussing a movie plot, someone might say, “I can give you a quick run down of the story.”
  • In a sports game analysis, a commentator might say, “Let’s run down the key plays from the first half.”

47. Rehearsing

This term is commonly used in the context of performing arts, such as theater, music, or dance, to refer to the process of practicing and fine-tuning a performance.

  • For instance, a theater actor might say, “We’ve been rehearsing this play for weeks.”
  • A musician might say, “I need to spend more time rehearsing this song before the gig.”
  • A dance troupe member might say, “We’re rehearsing our routine for the upcoming competition.”

48. Jamming

This slang term is commonly used in the context of musicians coming together to play music in an informal setting, often improvising and experimenting with different styles and sounds.

  • For example, a guitarist might say, “I had a great jamming session with some friends last night.”
  • A band member might say, “We’re getting together this weekend for a jamming session in our garage.”
  • A music enthusiast might say, “I love going to open mic nights and seeing different musicians jamming together.”

49. Working out

This phrase is commonly used to describe the act of engaging in physical exercise or training, typically with the goal of improving fitness or strength.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to the gym to work out.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might say, “I try to work out at least five times a week.”
  • A personal trainer might say, “Let’s start with some warm-up exercises before we really start working out.”

50. Repped out

This term is often used in the context of weightlifting or strength training to describe the act of performing a high number of repetitions of an exercise in a single set, typically until muscle fatigue or failure.

  • For example, a weightlifter might say, “I repped out 20 push-ups in my last set.”
  • A fitness trainer might say, “Let’s see how many pull-ups you can rep out.”
  • A gym-goer might say, “I’m trying to increase my strength, so I’ve been focusing on repping out heavier weights.”

51. Rehearsed it

This phrase refers to the act of practicing or preparing for something in advance. It implies that the person has gone through the motions or steps necessary to be ready for a performance or event.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I rehearsed the song before the concert.”
  • A speaker might mention, “I rehearsed my presentation multiple times to ensure a smooth delivery.”
  • In a dance competition, a participant might say, “We rehearsed our routine for weeks to perfect every move.”

52. Jammed it out

This slang phrase is often used in the context of playing music, but can also refer to any type of performance or creative activity. It implies a high level of energy, passion, and skill in the execution of the activity.

  • For instance, a guitarist might say, “We jammed it out during our rehearsal and the crowd loved it.”
  • A dancer might describe a performance as, “We jammed it out on stage and the audience went wild.”
  • In a theater production, an actor might say, “We jammed it out during the final scene and it was incredibly powerful.”

53. Worked it out

This phrase can have multiple meanings depending on the context. It can refer to practicing or rehearsing a specific activity, or it can mean resolving a problem or situation through effort and determination.

  • For example, a basketball player might say, “I worked out my shooting technique and improved my accuracy.”
  • A team member might say, “We worked out the logistics of the event and everything is running smoothly.”
  • In a relationship, a couple might say, “We had some issues, but we worked it out and are stronger than ever.”

54. Repping it

This slang phrase is often used in the context of promoting or showing support for a brand, team, or cause. It implies actively representing or promoting something through actions, words, or attire.

  • For instance, a fan might say, “I’m repping my favorite sports team by wearing their jersey.”
  • A social media influencer might mention, “I’m repping this new product because I genuinely love it.”
  • In a business meeting, a representative might say, “I’m repping our company’s values and mission in this negotiation.”

55. Woodshedding it out

This slang phrase is often used in the context of music or any other activity that requires extensive practice and skill development. It implies dedicating a significant amount of time and effort to practice and improve one’s abilities.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I spent hours woodshedding the guitar solo until I got it right.”
  • An athlete might describe their training as, “I’ve been woodshedding it out on the field to improve my performance.”
  • In a dance competition, a participant might say, “We’ve been woodshedding our routine to ensure precision and synchronization.”