Top 54 Slang For Preparation – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to getting ready for any task or event, having the right lingo can make all the difference. Whether you’re a student gearing up for exams or a professional prepping for a big presentation, knowing the latest slang for preparation can help you stay ahead of the game. Join us as we break down the top slang terms that will have you feeling ready and confident for whatever comes your way.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Prep

This term refers to the act or process of getting ready or making arrangements for a particular task or event. It can also be used as a verb to mean to prepare or get ready for something.

  • For example, “I need to do some prep before the meeting tomorrow.”
  • In a cooking context, someone might say, “I’ll start the prep for dinner while you set the table.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve been prepping for this exam all week.”

2. Prep work

This phrase refers to the preliminary tasks or actions that need to be completed before starting a main task or project. It often involves gathering information, setting up equipment, or organizing materials.

  • For instance, “I need to do some prep work before I can start painting the room.”
  • In a construction context, someone might say, “The prep work for the foundation is almost done.”
  • A chef might explain, “The key to a successful dish is proper prep work.”

3. Prep time

This phrase refers to the amount of time needed to prepare or get ready for a specific task or event. It can be used in various contexts, such as cooking, studying, or getting ready for a performance.

  • For example, “The recipe says the cake needs 30 minutes of prep time.”
  • A student might ask, “How much prep time should I allocate for this project?”
  • A musician might say, “I need some extra prep time before the concert tonight.”

4. Prep ahead

This phrase means to get ready or make arrangements for something in advance, typically before it is needed or before a scheduled event. It involves completing tasks or taking actions ahead of time to ensure smooth execution later.

  • For instance, “I like to prep ahead by packing my bag the night before.”
  • In a party planning context, someone might say, “I’ll prep ahead by setting up the decorations in the morning.”
  • A presenter might explain, “To avoid technical issues, I always prep ahead by testing the equipment.”

5. Prep mode

This phrase refers to a state of intense focus or concentration on preparing for a specific task or event. It implies being fully engaged and dedicated to completing the necessary preparations.

  • For example, “I’m in prep mode for the upcoming interview.”
  • A student might say, “During exam week, I go into full prep mode.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “It’s game day, everyone. Get into prep mode and give it your all!”

6. Prep it up

This phrase is used to encourage someone to prepare for something with excitement and energy.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Let’s prep it up for the big game!”
  • A friend might say, “Prep it up for the party tonight. It’s going to be epic!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Getting ready for my presentation. Time to prep it up and rock the stage!”

7. Prep like a boss

This phrase is used to emphasize the way someone prepares for a task or event, demonstrating confidence and a strong sense of control.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “I’m going to prep like a boss and create an amazing meal.”
  • A student might say, “I have a big exam tomorrow, so I’m going to prep like a boss and ace it!”
  • Someone might post a selfie with their study materials, captioned, “Prepping like a boss for this test. Nothing can stop me!”

8. Prep yourself

This phrase is used to tell someone to get ready and mentally prepare themselves for a situation or event.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Prep yourselves for a tough game ahead.”
  • A friend might say, “We’re about to watch a scary movie. Prep yourself for some jump scares!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “About to start a new job. Time to prep myself for success!”

9. Get prepped

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is ready and fully prepared for a task or event.

  • For instance, a performer might say, “I’ve been rehearsing all week. I’m finally prepped for the show.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve studied all night. I’m totally prepped for the exam!”
  • Someone might text their friend, “I’m coming over for the party. Get prepped for a night of fun!”

10. Prepped and ready

This phrase is used to emphasize that someone is fully prepared and ready to take action.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I’m prepped and ready for the mission.”
  • A presenter might say, “The slides are loaded, and I’m prepped and ready to give my talk.”
  • A performer might say backstage, “The band is tuned, and we’re all prepped and ready to rock the stage!”

11. Prep steps

Refers to the specific actions or tasks taken in order to prepare for something. These steps are often part of a larger process or routine.

  • For example, “Before baking a cake, you need to complete the prep steps like preheating the oven and greasing the pan.”
  • In a recipe, it might say, “Start by following the prep steps: chop the vegetables and measure out the ingredients.”
  • A fitness trainer might explain, “Before starting your workout, it’s important to do the prep steps like stretching and warming up.”

12. Prep routine

This term refers to the regular or habitual actions taken in order to prepare for something. It often involves a series of steps or tasks that are followed consistently.

  • For instance, “Before going to bed, I have a prep routine where I lay out my clothes for the next day and pack my bag.”
  • In a morning routine, someone might say, “My prep routine includes making breakfast, packing my lunch, and checking my schedule for the day.”
  • A student might share, “My prep routine for exams involves reviewing notes, making flashcards, and practicing past questions.”

13. Prep session

A designated period of time set aside for the purpose of preparing or getting ready for something. It implies a focused and dedicated effort towards preparation.

  • For example, “I have a prep session scheduled for tomorrow to study for my final exam.”
  • A team preparing for a presentation might say, “Let’s have a prep session this afternoon to go over our slides and practice our delivery.”
  • A chef might announce, “I’ll be in the kitchen for a prep session before dinner service starts.”

14. Prep phase

Refers to a specific stage or period of time during which preparation takes place. It implies that preparation occurs in different phases or stages.

  • For instance, “We’re currently in the prep phase of the project, gathering information and planning our approach.”
  • In a construction project, someone might say, “The prep phase involves clearing the site, setting up equipment, and obtaining necessary permits.”
  • A coach might explain, “During the prep phase of training, athletes focus on building strength and conditioning.”

15. Prep day

A designated day or period of time specifically allocated for preparation. It suggests that a significant amount of preparation needs to be done within that timeframe.

  • For example, “Sunday is my prep day where I plan meals for the week, do grocery shopping, and prepare ingredients.”
  • A student might say, “The day before an exam is my prep day, where I review notes, make study guides, and get organized.”
  • A bride-to-be might share, “The day before the wedding is my prep day, where I get my hair and makeup done, do a final dress fitting, and make sure everything is ready.”

16. Prep list

A prep list is a list of tasks or items that need to be completed or gathered in order to be fully prepared for a specific event or situation.

  • For example, before going on a trip, someone might create a prep list that includes packing essentials, making travel arrangements, and completing necessary paperwork.
  • In a cooking context, a prep list might include chopping vegetables, measuring ingredients, and preheating the oven.
  • A student might create a prep list for studying, which could include gathering necessary materials, creating a study schedule, and reviewing key concepts.
See also  Top 39 Slang For Nostalgia – Meaning & Usage

17. Prep kit

A prep kit is a collection of items or tools that are assembled in advance to assist with a specific task or activity.

  • For instance, a first-aid kit can be considered a prep kit because it contains various medical supplies and equipment for treating injuries.
  • In camping or outdoor activities, a prep kit might include a tent, sleeping bag, cooking utensils, and other essentials.
  • A makeup artist might have a prep kit that includes various cosmetics, brushes, and tools for preparing clients.

18. Prep gear

Prep gear refers to the equipment or gear that is necessary or helpful for preparing for a specific activity or situation.

  • For example, if someone is going hiking, their prep gear might include hiking boots, a backpack, a map, and a compass.
  • In a sports context, prep gear might include athletic shoes, protective gear, and any specialized equipment needed for a particular sport.
  • A chef might consider their knives, cutting boards, and other kitchen tools as part of their prep gear.

19. Prep vibes

Prep vibes refers to the positive energy or mindset that is associated with being fully prepared and ready for a specific event or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is feeling confident and well-prepared before a job interview, they might say they have good prep vibes.
  • In a sports context, a team might talk about having strong prep vibes before a big game.
  • A student might feel prepared and focused before a test, attributing their mindset to their prep vibes.

20. Prep game

Prep game refers to the approach or strategy that someone takes when preparing for a specific event or situation.

  • For example, if someone is studying for an exam, they might talk about their prep game, meaning the methods and techniques they are using to prepare.
  • In a fitness context, someone might discuss their prep game for a marathon, including their training plan and nutrition strategy.
  • A chef might talk about their prep game for a busy night in the restaurant, referring to their organization and efficiency in preparing ingredients and dishes.

21. Prime

To prepare or make ready for a particular action or event. “Prime” is often used to describe the initial steps taken to prepare for something.

  • For example, “I need to prime myself before the big presentation.”
  • A person getting ready for a job interview might say, “I need to prime my mind by reviewing my notes.”
  • Another might say, “I always prime my equipment before a workout to ensure it’s in good condition.”

22. Ready

To be fully prepared or organized for a particular action or event. “Ready” is a general term used to indicate that someone or something is prepared or in a state of readiness.

  • For instance, “I’m ready for the party tonight.”
  • A person about to start a race might say, “On your mark, get set, ready!”
  • Another might ask, “Is everyone ready for the meeting?”

23. Fix up

To make necessary preparations or arrangements. “Fix up” is often used to describe the act of getting things ready or in order.

  • For example, “I need to fix up the house before our guests arrive.”
  • A person preparing for a trip might say, “I need to fix up my travel documents.”
  • Another might say, “I’ll fix up the meeting room before the clients arrive.”

24. Lay the groundwork

To create the necessary foundation or basis for something. “Lay the groundwork” is often used to describe the initial steps taken to prepare for a larger project or goal.

  • For instance, “We need to lay the groundwork for our marketing campaign.”
  • A person starting a new business might say, “I’m laying the groundwork for my company.”
  • Another might discuss, “We laid the groundwork for our research by conducting a literature review.”

25. Set the stage

To prepare or arrange the necessary conditions or environment for something to happen. “Set the stage” is often used to describe the act of preparing the setting or context for an event or situation.

  • For example, “We need to set the stage for our performance.”
  • A person organizing a party might say, “Let’s set the stage with some decorations.”
  • Another might discuss, “We set the stage for success by creating a positive work environment.”

26. Arm up

This phrase is often used to describe the act of preparing oneself for a potentially dangerous or challenging situation by obtaining a weapon or protective gear. It can also be used metaphorically to mean preparing oneself mentally or emotionally for a difficult task or situation.

  • For example, in a war movie, a soldier might say, “We need to arm up before we go into battle.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might advise, “It’s important to arm up and be prepared to protect yourself.”
  • A person getting ready to give a speech might say, “I need to arm up with some confidence before I go on stage.”

27. Gird up

This phrase comes from the biblical expression “gird up your loins,” which means to gather up and secure long garments in order to be ready for physical activity or travel. It is used metaphorically to mean preparing oneself mentally or emotionally for a difficult or challenging task.

  • For instance, someone getting ready to take a difficult exam might say, “I need to gird up and study hard.”
  • In a discussion about facing fears, a person might say, “I had to gird up and confront my fear of public speaking.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s gird up and give it our all in the game today.”

28. Warm up

This phrase is commonly used in sports and physical activities to describe the act of performing exercises or movements to increase muscle flexibility and blood flow before engaging in more intense physical activity. It can also be used metaphorically to mean preparing oneself mentally or emotionally for a task or event.

  • For example, a fitness instructor might say, “Let’s warm up with some light stretches before we start the workout.”
  • In a discussion about preparing for a job interview, someone might advise, “Take some time to warm up by practicing your answers and doing research on the company.”
  • A performer getting ready for a concert might say, “I always warm up my voice before going on stage.”

29. Ready oneself

This phrase simply means to prepare oneself for a task, event, or situation. It can refer to physical, mental, or emotional preparation.

  • For instance, before a big race, a runner might say, “I need to ready myself by getting a good night’s sleep and eating a healthy meal.”
  • In a discussion about preparing for a job interview, someone might advise, “Take some time to ready yourself by practicing your answers and researching the company.”
  • A person getting ready to give a presentation might say, “I need to ready myself by rehearsing my speech and creating visual aids.”

30. Get set

This phrase is commonly used in sports or competitive settings to indicate that someone should prepare themselves for an upcoming event or action. It can also be used more generally to mean preparing oneself for any task or situation.

  • For example, in a track and field competition, an announcer might say, “Runners, get set!” before the start of a race.
  • In a discussion about preparing for a job interview, someone might advise, “Get set by reviewing your resume and preparing answers to common interview questions.”
  • A person getting ready to go on a trip might say, “I need to get set by packing my suitcase and making sure I have all the necessary documents.”

31. Make ready

To make the necessary arrangements or take the necessary actions to be ready for something.

  • For example, “I need to make ready for the upcoming presentation.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Make ready for the big game tomorrow.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Make ready for school by packing your backpack the night before.”

32. Set the table

To arrange the table with plates, utensils, and other items necessary for a meal.

  • For instance, “I’ll set the table while you finish cooking dinner.”
  • When hosting a dinner party, one might ask, “Can you help me set the table for our guests?”
  • A child might be assigned the task of “setting the table” before a family meal.
See also  Top 0 Slang For Mix – Meaning & Usage

33. Get things in order

To arrange or organize things in a particular way to ensure readiness or efficiency.

  • For example, “Before we start, let’s get things in order.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “We need to get things in order before the deadline.”
  • A person preparing for a trip might say, “I need to get things in order before I leave.”

34. Get the ball rolling

To initiate or begin an activity or process.

  • For instance, “Let’s get the ball rolling on the new project.”
  • A team leader might say, “We need to get the ball rolling on our marketing campaign.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “Let’s get the ball rolling on our group project.”

35. Get the show on the road

To begin or start a venture or activity.

  • For example, “We’ve planned enough, it’s time to get the show on the road.”
  • A director might say to the cast, “Let’s get the show on the road and start rehearsing.”
  • A person preparing for a road trip might exclaim, “It’s time to get the show on the road and start our adventure!”

36. Get cracking

This phrase means to begin a task or activity. It is often used to encourage someone to start working or to indicate that it’s time to get started.

  • For example, a boss might say, “We have a lot to do today, so let’s get cracking.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Time to get cracking on your assignments.”
  • A friend might say, “We only have an hour left, so let’s get cracking if we want to finish on time.”

37. Put in the legwork

This expression means to put in the necessary effort and work required to achieve a goal or complete a task. It emphasizes the importance of hard work and dedication.

  • For instance, someone might say, “If you want to succeed, you have to put in the legwork.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “You can’t expect to win without putting in the legwork at practice.”
  • A colleague might say, “I put in a lot of legwork to gather all the necessary data for the report.”

38. Get your ducks in a row

This phrase means to get everything in order or to make sure all the necessary preparations have been made. It suggests the need for organization and careful planning.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “Before we start, let’s get our ducks in a row and make sure we have all the necessary resources.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Get your ducks in a row before you leave for school, so you don’t forget anything.”
  • A friend might say, “I need to get my ducks in a row before I can start working on my presentation.”

39. Get your act together

This expression means to improve one’s behavior or performance by becoming more organized, focused, or responsible. It implies the need for someone to make positive changes in order to achieve better results.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to a student, “You need to get your act together and start turning in your assignments on time.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “If we want to win, we all need to get our acts together and start working as a team.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “It’s time to get your act together and start taking responsibility for your actions.”

40. Do your homework

This phrase means to gather information or prepare for a task or situation. It is often used in the context of studying or researching a topic.

  • For example, a teacher might tell their students, “Make sure to do your homework before the exam.”
  • A boss might say to an employee, “Before the meeting, do your homework and familiarize yourself with the client’s background.”
  • A friend might advise, “If you’re going to buy a new car, do your homework and compare prices and features.”

41. Get your tools ready

This phrase means to gather and organize the tools or equipment needed for a specific task or activity.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Get your tools ready for practice.”
  • A DIY enthusiast might say, “I need to get my tools ready before I start this project.”
  • In a kitchen, a chef might instruct their sous chef, “Get your tools ready for tonight’s service.”

42. Get your gear in order

This phrase means to arrange or prepare your gear or equipment in a neat and orderly manner.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “Before we start the trek, let’s get our gear in order.”
  • A soldier preparing for a mission might be told, “Get your gear in order and report back in 10 minutes.”
  • A photographer might instruct their assistant, “Make sure to get your gear in order before the shoot.”

43. Get your equipment ready

This phrase means to make sure your equipment is prepared and ready to be used for a specific task or activity.

  • For example, a mechanic might say, “Get your equipment ready for the next repair job.”
  • A musician might tell their bandmates, “We have a gig tonight, so let’s get our equipment ready.”
  • A gardener might instruct their assistant, “Get your equipment ready for planting season.”

44. Get your supplies in order

This phrase means to arrange or prepare the supplies or materials needed for a specific task or activity in a systematic manner.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to their students, “Before we start the experiment, let’s get our supplies in order.”
  • A chef might instruct their sous chef, “Get your supplies in order for tonight’s dinner service.”
  • A homeowner might tell their family, “We’re going camping this weekend, so let’s get our supplies in order.”

45. Get your resources ready

This phrase means to gather and prepare the resources or assets required for a specific task or activity.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “Get your resources ready for the upcoming project.”
  • A business owner might instruct their team, “We have a big presentation tomorrow, so let’s get our resources ready.”
  • A student might tell their classmates, “We need to get our resources ready for the group project.”

46. Get your materials ready

This phrase is used to remind someone to gather or organize the materials they need for a specific task or activity.

  • For example, a teacher might tell their students, “Get your materials ready for the science experiment.”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might say, “Make sure to get your materials ready before we start.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Get your materials ready for practice tomorrow.”

47. Get your stuff together

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to gather or organize their belongings or to get themselves mentally prepared for a situation.

  • For instance, a parent might tell their child, “Get your stuff together before we leave the house.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “You need to get your stuff together before the meeting.”
  • A friend might advise, “If you want to succeed, you need to get your stuff together and start studying.”

48. Get your things in order

This phrase is used to suggest that someone should organize and prepare their belongings or affairs in a neat and orderly manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Before you move, make sure to get your things in order.”
  • In a business context, a manager might advise their employee, “Get your things in order before the audit.”
  • A person preparing for a trip might remind themselves, “I need to get my things in order before I leave.”

49. Get your belongings in order

This slang phrase is similar to “get your things in order” and is used to suggest that someone should organize and prepare their personal belongings in a neat and orderly manner.

  • For instance, a landlord might tell their tenant, “You have 24 hours to get your belongings in order before eviction.”
  • In a decluttering conversation, someone might say, “It’s time to get your belongings in order and clear out the excess.”
  • A person preparing for a move might remind themselves, “I need to get my belongings in order so the movers can pack them efficiently.”

50. Get your possessions in order

This phrase is similar to “get your belongings in order” and is used to suggest that someone should organize and prepare their personal possessions in a neat and orderly manner.

  • For example, a parent might tell their child, “Get your possessions in order before we leave for vacation.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might advise their client, “You need to get your possessions in order before the court hearing.”
  • A person preparing for a home renovation might remind themselves, “I need to get my possessions in order so they don’t get damaged during construction.”

51. Get your act in order

This phrase means to get your life or situation in order and be well-prepared for something.

  • For example, if someone is procrastinating and not getting their work done, you might say, “You need to get your act in order before the deadline.”
  • In a team meeting, a manager might tell their employees, “We need to get our act in order if we want to meet our goals.”
  • If someone is constantly late and disorganized, a friend might say, “It’s time for you to get your act in order and start being more responsible.”

52. Get your affairs in order

This phrase means to take care of all your personal matters and make sure everything is in order, especially in preparation for a major event or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is planning to go on a long trip, you might advise them, “Make sure to get your affairs in order before you leave.”
  • If someone is preparing for their retirement, a financial advisor might say, “It’s important to get your affairs in order and plan for your future.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might tell their client, “It’s time to get your affairs in order and update your will.”

53. Get your business in order

This phrase means to arrange and prepare all the necessary aspects of your business to ensure smooth operations and success.

  • For example, if a company is struggling with inefficiencies, a consultant might suggest, “You need to get your business in order and streamline your processes.”
  • If a manager notices that their team is not meeting deadlines, they might say, “It’s time to get your business in order and improve your time management.”
  • In a discussion about entrepreneurship, someone might advise, “Before launching your startup, make sure to get your business in order by creating a solid business plan.”

54. Get your life in order

This phrase means to organize and manage your personal life in a way that allows you to be prepared for whatever comes your way.

  • For instance, if someone is going through a chaotic period, a therapist might suggest, “You need to get your life in order and establish a routine.”
  • If a person wants to make positive changes in their life, a self-help book might recommend, “Start by getting your life in order and setting clear goals.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “Getting your life in order requires self-reflection and taking responsibility for your actions.”