Top 42 Slang For Prevents – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying safe and out of harm’s way, having the right lingo can make all the difference. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang for prevents to keep you in the know and ahead of the game. From common phrases to trendy terms, we’ve got you covered with the latest and most essential vocabulary for staying safe and secure in any situation. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your slang game with us!

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1. Blocks

To block means to prevent something from happening or progressing. It can refer to physical obstacles or figurative barriers.

  • For example, “The goalie blocked the shot and saved the game.”
  • In a discussion about internet security, someone might say, “Using a strong firewall can help block hackers from accessing your personal information.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “Don’t let fear block your path to success.”

2. Thwarts

To thwart means to prevent someone from accomplishing their goals or intentions. It implies frustration or interference.

  • For instance, “The detective thwarted the criminal’s escape plan.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding procrastination, someone might say, “Setting clear goals can thwart distractions.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “Don’t let setbacks thwart your dreams.”

3. Foils

To foil means to prevent someone or something from being successful or effective. It suggests a clever or strategic action.

  • For example, “The superhero foiled the villain’s evil plan.”
  • In a discussion about preventing identity theft, someone might say, “Using strong passwords can foil hackers.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “Her quick thinking foiled the attempt to ruin the surprise party.”

4. Stymies

To stymie means to prevent or hinder progress or action. It implies a significant obstacle or challenge.

  • For instance, “The lack of funding stymied the development of the project.”
  • In a conversation about overcoming obstacles, someone might say, “A positive mindset can help stymie self-doubt.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “Don’t let fear of failure stymie your ambitions.”

5. Nips in the bud

To nip in the bud means to stop something before it has a chance to develop or grow. It suggests taking action at an early stage.

  • For example, “The teacher nipped the disruptive behavior in the bud.”
  • In a discussion about preventing conflicts, someone might say, “Open communication can nip misunderstandings in the bud.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “Addressing minor issues early on can nip bigger problems in the bud.”

6. Halts

To bring to a stop or put an end to something. “Halts” is a slang term used to describe preventing or stopping something from happening.

  • For example, “The new security measures will halt unauthorized access to the building.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The goalie made a crucial save that halted the opposing team’s scoring.”
  • A person discussing a potential disaster might say, “We need to take immediate action to halt the spread of the virus.”

7. Deters

To discourage or prevent someone from doing something. “Deters” is a slang term used to describe preventing someone from taking a particular action.

  • For instance, “The heavy police presence deters criminals from committing crimes in this area.”
  • A person might say, “The high cost of tuition deters many students from pursuing higher education.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, one might say, “Using strong passwords and encryption deters hackers from accessing sensitive information.”

8. Checks

To block or prevent progress or movement. “Checks” is a slang term used to describe preventing or blocking something from happening.

  • For example, “The security system checks unauthorized access to the building.”
  • In a discussion about preventing fraud, one might say, “Regularly checking credit card statements helps to detect and prevent fraudulent charges.”
  • A person discussing road safety might say, “Installing speed bumps checks speeding in residential areas.”

9. Hinders

To obstruct or slow down the progress of something. “Hinders” is a slang term used to describe preventing or slowing down the advancement of something.

  • For instance, “The heavy rain hindered our plans to go hiking.”
  • In a conversation about productivity, one might say, “Constant interruptions hinder workflow and productivity.”
  • A person discussing the impact of regulations might argue, “Excessive bureaucracy hinders economic growth.”

10. Obstructs

To block or hinder the passage or progress of something. “Obstructs” is a slang term used to describe preventing or blocking something from happening.

  • For example, “The fallen tree obstructs the road, preventing cars from passing.”
  • In a discussion about justice, one might say, “Tampering with evidence obstructs the investigation.”
  • A person discussing communication might say, “Using jargon obstructs effective communication between different departments.”

11. Stalls

To stall is to intentionally delay or hinder progress or action. It can refer to various situations where someone or something is prevented from moving forward or making progress.

  • For example, “The negotiations stalled due to disagreements between the two parties.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The defense stalled the offense’s drive with a key interception.”
  • A person discussing work might say, “I need to stall this project until we receive additional funding.”

12. Stifles

To stifle is to suppress or restrain something, often with the aim of preventing it from happening or progressing further.

  • For instance, “The government stifled dissent by censoring the media.”
  • In a creative context, an artist might say, “I don’t want to stifle my creativity by sticking to a specific style.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Don’t let fear stifle your ambitions.”

13. Quashes

To quash is to crush, eliminate, or put an end to something, often forcefully and decisively.

  • For example, “The court quashed the lawsuit due to lack of evidence.”
  • In a political context, a leader might say, “We will quash any attempts to undermine our authority.”
  • A person discussing rumors might say, “Let’s quash these false rumors once and for all.”

14. Counters

To counter is to oppose or neutralize something, often with the aim of preventing its effects or minimizing its impact.

  • For instance, “He countered his opponent’s argument with strong evidence.”
  • In a strategic context, a general might say, “We need to counter the enemy’s advances with a strong defense.”
  • A person discussing a debate might say, “She countered her opponent’s point with a well-reasoned argument.”

15. Intercepts

To intercept is to catch or block something that is in motion, often with the aim of preventing it from reaching its intended destination.

  • For example, “The defender intercepted the pass and ran it back for a touchdown.”
  • In a communication context, a person might say, “I intercepted a suspicious email before it reached my inbox.”
  • A person discussing espionage might say, “The spy intercepted classified information before it could be transmitted.”

16. Throttles

To “throttle” something means to control or limit its speed or intensity. In the context of slang for prevents, it refers to taking action to slow down or restrict something from happening.

  • For example, “The new regulations aim to throttle the spread of fake news.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “We need to throttle potential threats before they can cause any damage.”
  • A person talking about managing their workload might say, “I have to throttle my productivity to avoid burnout.”

17. Staves off

To “stave off” something means to keep it away or delay its occurrence. It implies taking action to prevent something from happening, usually temporarily.

  • For instance, “Drinking plenty of water can help stave off dehydration.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding illness, someone might say, “I take vitamins every day to stave off colds and flu.”
  • A person discussing financial planning might advise, “Saving money now can stave off financial difficulties in the future.”

18. Averts

To “avert” something means to avoid it or prevent it from happening. It suggests taking action to steer clear of a potential negative outcome.

  • For example, “Quick thinking averted a major disaster.”
  • In a discussion about road safety, someone might say, “Wearing a seatbelt can avert serious injuries in a car accident.”
  • A person talking about conflict resolution might advise, “Open communication can help avert misunderstandings and disputes.”

19. Precludes

To “preclude” something means to prevent it from happening or make it impossible. It implies taking action to eliminate the possibility of a particular outcome.

  • For instance, “The new security measures preclude unauthorized access to the building.”
  • In a conversation about safety precautions, someone might say, “Wearing a helmet precludes head injuries while biking.”
  • A person discussing risk management might advise, “Diversifying your investments can preclude significant financial losses.”

20. Repels

To “repel” something means to keep it away or drive it back. In the context of slang for prevents, it refers to taking action to ward off or repulse something unwanted.

  • For example, “Insect repellent helps repel mosquitoes and other bugs.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might say, “Setting clear boundaries can repel toxic relationships.”
  • A person talking about self-defense might advise, “Learning martial arts can help repel potential attackers.”

21. Frustrates

This term refers to something that causes annoyance or disappointment, often by hindering or preventing progress or success.

  • For example, “The constant interruptions during the meeting frustrated the team and delayed their decision-making.”
  • In a discussion about productivity, someone might say, “Procrastination frustrates our ability to accomplish tasks.”
  • A person experiencing technical difficulties might exclaim, “This slow internet connection is so frustrating!”

22. Derails

To “derail” means to cause something to deviate from its intended path or course, often by interrupting or diverting attention or progress.

  • For instance, “The unexpected news derailed their plans for the weekend trip.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to stay focused and not let minor setbacks derail us.”
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might reflect, “Trust issues can easily derail a healthy partnership.”

23. Thwart

When something “thwarts” a plan or action, it hinders or prevents its success or completion.

  • For example, “The security measures in place thwarted the attempted theft.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “Strong passwords can thwart hackers.”
  • A person describing a failed attempt might say, “My efforts to fix the car were thwarted by a lack of necessary tools.”

24. Hinder

To “hinder” means to create obstacles or difficulties that delay or obstruct progress or achievement.

  • For instance, “The heavy traffic hindered their arrival at the meeting.”
  • In a conversation about education, someone might say, “A lack of resources can hinder a student’s ability to succeed.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might reflect, “Negative self-talk can hinder one’s confidence and development.”

25. Impede

To “impede” means to hinder, obstruct, or slow down progress or movement.

  • For example, “The construction work impeded traffic flow on the road.”
  • In a discussion about innovation, someone might say, “Fear of failure can impede creative thinking.”
  • A person describing a challenging situation might say, “The language barrier impeded effective communication.”

26. Counteract

To counteract means to take action to neutralize or offset the effects or influence of something. It is often used when describing how one substance or action can counter the negative effects of another.

  • For example, “Taking an antacid can counteract the acidity in your stomach.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, one might say, “Planting trees can help counteract the carbon emissions.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to counteract the effects of aging, make sure to exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet.”

27. Preclude

Preclude means to make something impossible or prevent it from happening. It is often used to describe actions taken to prevent the occurrence of something undesirable.

  • For instance, “Wearing a seatbelt can preclude serious injuries in a car accident.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, one might say, “Implementing strong passwords can preclude unauthorized access to your accounts.”
  • A person might advise, “To preclude the spread of germs, make sure to wash your hands regularly and cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing.”

28. Repel

To repel means to drive away or keep something at a distance. It is often used to describe actions taken to keep something or someone away.

  • For example, “Using insect repellent can help repel mosquitoes.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, one might say, “Carrying pepper spray can help repel potential attackers.”
  • A person might advise, “To repel unwanted pests, make sure to keep your living area clean and free of food crumbs.”

29. Intercept

To intercept means to catch or stop something or someone in their course or progress. It is often used to describe actions taken to catch or seize something before it reaches its intended destination.

  • For instance, “The football player intercepted the pass and ran it back for a touchdown.”
  • In a discussion about national security, one might say, “Intelligence agencies work to intercept and analyze communications from potential threats.”
  • A person might advise, “To intercept package thieves, consider installing a security camera near your front door.”

30. Neutralize

To neutralize means to render something ineffective or disable its harmful effects. It is often used to describe actions taken to counteract or eliminate a threat.

  • For example, “Adding a base can neutralize the acidity of a solution.”
  • In a discussion about chemical warfare, one might say, “Chemical weapons inspectors work to neutralize and dispose of dangerous substances.”
  • A person might advise, “To neutralize the effects of a spicy meal, drink a glass of milk or eat some bread.”

31. Inhibit

To prevent or restrain someone or something from doing or achieving something. “Inhibit” can also refer to the suppression or reduction of a function or process.

  • For example, “His fear of failure inhibited him from pursuing his dreams.”
  • In a scientific context, one might say, “The drug inhibits the growth of cancer cells.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Don’t let your shyness inhibit your participation in class.”

32. Frustrate

To hinder or prevent someone from achieving their goals or desires. “Frustrate” can also describe the feeling of being disappointed or discouraged.

  • For instance, “The constant setbacks frustrated his efforts to complete the project.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The defense frustrated the opposing team’s attempts to score.”
  • A parent might express frustration by saying, “I’m so frustrated with my child’s behavior right now.”

33. Blockade

To create a barrier or obstacle that prevents movement or access. “Blockade” can also refer to a military tactic of surrounding or isolating an area to prevent supplies or reinforcements from reaching it.

  • For example, “Protesters blockaded the entrance to the government building.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “The naval blockade prevented essential resources from reaching the enemy.”
  • A person frustrated by road construction might say, “The ongoing blockade is causing major traffic delays.”

34. Curb

To control or limit something, typically to prevent it from becoming excessive or getting out of hand. “Curb” can also refer to the raised edge of a sidewalk or road.

  • For instance, “The government implemented measures to curb inflation.”
  • In a parenting context, one might say, “I need to find effective ways to curb my child’s temper tantrums.”
  • A person trying to lose weight might say, “I’m trying to curb my cravings for unhealthy snacks.”

35. Halt

To bring to a stop or put an end to something. “Halt” can also refer to a temporary or sudden stop in movement or progress.

  • For example, “The construction work halted due to budget constraints.”
  • In a military context, one might say, “The troops were ordered to halt their advance.”
  • A person might say, “I had to halt my plans to travel due to unforeseen circumstances.”

36. Prevent

To stop something from happening or to keep something from occurring.

  • For example, “Taking regular breaks can prevent burnout.”
  • A doctor might advise, “Preventive measures such as vaccinations can help prevent the spread of diseases.”
  • A safety manual might state, “Wearing protective gear can prevent accidents in the workplace.”

37. Obviate

To make something unnecessary or to avoid the need for something.

  • For instance, “Regular maintenance can obviate the need for costly repairs.”
  • A company might implement new technology to obviate the need for manual data entry.
  • A teacher might say, “Providing clear instructions can obviate confusion among students.”

38. Ward off

To keep something or someone away or to prevent something from happening.

  • For example, “Wearing insect repellent can ward off mosquitoes.”
  • A person might say, “I take vitamin C to ward off colds.”
  • A homeowner might install a security system to ward off burglars.
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39. Veto

To reject or refuse to approve something, especially a decision or proposal.

  • For instance, “The president has the power to veto a bill passed by Congress.”
  • A manager might veto a project proposal if it does not align with the company’s goals.
  • A parent might veto their child’s request to stay out late on a school night.

40. Disrupts

To disturb or interrupt the normal course of something, causing a disturbance or interference.

  • For example, “A loud noise disrupted the meeting.”
  • A technical glitch can disrupt an online video conference.
  • A protest can disrupt traffic and public transportation.

41. Obviates

This term refers to the action of preventing or eliminating the need for something. It implies that a certain action or measure has made something unnecessary or irrelevant.

  • For example, “The new software obviates the need for manual data entry.”
  • In a discussion about advancements in technology, one might say, “Automation obviates the need for repetitive tasks.”
  • A person might suggest, “Implementing stricter security measures can obviate the risk of unauthorized access.”

42. Stanches

This slang term means to stop or control the flow of something, particularly in the context of preventing the spread or continuation of something undesirable.

  • For instance, “Applying pressure to the wound can stanch the bleeding.”
  • In a conversation about containing a fire, one might say, “The firefighters worked to stanch the flames.”
  • A person discussing the containment of a virus might say, “Strict quarantine measures are necessary to stanch the spread of the disease.”