Top 40 Slang For Privilege – Meaning & Usage

Privilege, a concept that often sparks debate and discussion, is a topic that deserves our attention. Understanding the slang associated with privilege can provide valuable insights into the nuances and complexities of this issue. In this listicle, we’ve curated a collection of top slang terms for privilege that will not only expand your vocabulary but also give you a deeper understanding of the cultural conversations surrounding this topic. Get ready to dive in and explore the fascinating world of privilege slang!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Silver spoon

This phrase refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family. It implies that they have had a life of luxury and have not had to work for their success.

  • For example, “He was born with a silver spoon in his mouth and has never had to worry about money.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, one might say, “Many politicians come from the silver spoon class and are out of touch with the struggles of everyday people.”
  • A person might describe someone as, “She’s a silver spoon kid who has never had to work a day in her life.”

2. Trust fund baby

This term refers to someone who inherits a large sum of money or assets from a trust fund. It implies that they have financial security and do not need to work for a living.

  • For instance, “He’s a trust fund baby who doesn’t need to worry about finding a job.”
  • In a conversation about privilege, one might say, “Trust fund babies often have a distorted view of the real world.”
  • A person might use this term to describe someone as, “She’s a trust fund baby who has never had to worry about money.”

3. Born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth

This phrase has the same meaning as “silver spoon” and refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family. It implies that they have had a life of luxury and have not had to work for their success.

  • For example, “She was born with a silver spoon in her mouth and has never had to worry about money.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, one might say, “Many politicians come from the born with a silver spoon class and are out of touch with the struggles of everyday people.”
  • A person might describe someone as, “He’s born with a silver spoon in his mouth and has never had to work a day in his life.”

4. Country club set

This term refers to a group of wealthy individuals who are members of a country club. It implies a certain level of privilege and exclusivity.

  • For instance, “She’s part of the country club set and spends her weekends golfing and socializing.”
  • In a conversation about social circles, one might say, “The country club set is known for their extravagant parties and luxurious lifestyles.”
  • A person might describe someone as, “He’s part of the country club set and has never had to worry about money.”

5. Blue blood

This term refers to someone who comes from a wealthy and aristocratic background. It implies a lineage of privilege and high social status.

  • For example, “She’s a blue blood who can trace her family’s wealth back for generations.”
  • In a discussion about social classes, one might say, “Blue bloods often have access to opportunities and resources that others do not.”
  • A person might use this term to describe someone as, “He’s a blue blood who has never had to work a day in his life.”

6. Upper crust

This term refers to the highest social class or the wealthiest and most influential people in society. It is often used to describe those who have a higher status or more opportunities due to their wealth or privilege.

  • For example, “The upper crust of society attended the exclusive gala.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, one might say, “The upper crust continues to benefit from unfair advantages.”
  • A person might comment, “She was born into the upper crust and has never known financial struggle.”

7. High society

This term refers to the group of people who are considered to be of high social status or wealth. It often implies a certain level of exclusivity and sophistication.

  • For instance, “She is a prominent figure in high society.”
  • In a conversation about social events, one might say, “The charity ball is attended by members of high society.”
  • A person discussing social dynamics might comment, “High society often dictates the trends and norms of the upper class.”

8. Privileged class

This term refers to a social class or group of people who have inherent advantages or benefits due to their social, economic, or political status. It often implies that these individuals have access to resources and opportunities that others may not have.

  • For example, “The privileged class has access to the best education and healthcare.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, one might say, “The privileged class often remains oblivious to the struggles of the less fortunate.”
  • A person might comment, “Being born into the privileged class doesn’t guarantee happiness or fulfillment.”

9. Elite

This term refers to a select group of people who are considered to be the best, most powerful, or most influential in a particular field or society. It often implies a level of exclusivity and superiority.

  • For instance, “She is part of the elite group of athletes.”
  • In a conversation about academic achievements, one might say, “Only the elite students are admitted to that university.”
  • A person discussing social hierarchies might comment, “The elite often control the majority of resources and decision-making power.”

10. Jet set

This term refers to a group of people who are wealthy or affluent and frequently travel to various destinations. It often implies a luxurious and glamorous lifestyle.

  • For example, “The jet set crowd is always seen at the most exclusive resorts.”
  • In a discussion about travel, one might say, “Only the jet set can afford to fly first class.”
  • A person might comment, “She lives the jet set life, constantly hopping from one exotic location to another.”

11. One percenter

This term refers to the top 1% of the population who are extremely wealthy and have significant financial advantages over the rest of society.

  • For example, “The one percenters live in luxurious mansions and drive expensive cars.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The one percenters control a disproportionate amount of wealth.”
  • A critic of the system might argue, “Our society is designed to benefit the one percenters at the expense of the majority.”

12. Silver-spooned

This slang term describes someone who has grown up in a privileged and wealthy family, often with a silver spoon in their mouth. It implies that the person has had many advantages and opportunities handed to them.

  • For instance, “He was born silver-spooned, never having to worry about money.”
  • In a conversation about social mobility, someone might say, “Silver-spooned individuals have a head start in life.”
  • A critic of inherited wealth might argue, “Being silver-spooned can shield you from the realities of the world.”

13. Moneyed class

This term refers to the social class or group of people who have significant wealth and financial resources. It highlights the distinction between the wealthy and the rest of society.

  • For example, “The moneyed class often frequents exclusive clubs and resorts.”
  • In a discussion about economic disparities, someone might say, “The moneyed class has access to opportunities that others can only dream of.”
  • A critic of wealth inequality might argue, “The moneyed class hoards resources while others struggle to make ends meet.”

14. Well-heeled

This slang term describes someone who is financially well-off or wealthy. It implies that the person has the means to live a comfortable and affluent lifestyle.

  • For instance, “She comes from a well-heeled family and has never had to worry about money.”
  • In a conversation about luxury goods, someone might say, “Well-heeled individuals can afford to buy designer brands.”
  • A person discussing social status might note, “Being well-heeled can open doors and provide opportunities that others don’t have.”

15. Filthy rich

This slang term emphasizes the extreme wealth and opulence of an individual. It suggests that the person’s wealth is excessive and perhaps obtained through questionable means.

  • For example, “He became filthy rich overnight after winning the lottery.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The filthy rich continue to amass wealth while others struggle to make ends meet.”
  • A critic of excessive wealth might argue, “The filthy rich hoard resources that could be used to address societal issues.”

16. Upper class

The upper class refers to the highest social group in a society, typically characterized by wealth, power, and inherited privilege. It is often associated with a luxurious lifestyle and exclusive access to resources and opportunities.

  • For example, “Members of the upper class often live in mansions and attend prestigious private schools.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The upper class controls a disproportionate amount of wealth in society.”
  • A critic of the upper class might argue, “Their privilege allows them to remain disconnected from the struggles of the working class.”

17. Aristocracy

The aristocracy refers to a privileged social class made up of hereditary nobles or those with a high social rank. Historically, the aristocracy held significant political power and enjoyed privileges and titles that were not accessible to the common people.

  • For instance, “The British aristocracy includes dukes, earls, and other titled individuals.”
  • In a conversation about social mobility, someone might say, “The aristocracy was resistant to change and maintained its power through inheritance.”
  • A critic of inherited privilege might argue, “The aristocracy perpetuates inequality and limits opportunities for those outside their ranks.”

18. Gilded class

The gilded class refers to a group of wealthy individuals who live lavish lifestyles and enjoy the privileges that come with their wealth. The term “gilded” suggests that their wealth is merely a thin layer of gold covering deeper social issues and inequalities.

  • For example, “Members of the gilded class often flaunt their wealth through extravagant parties and luxury purchases.”
  • In a discussion about income disparities, someone might say, “The gilded class benefits from a rigged economic system that favors the rich.”
  • A critic of excessive wealth might argue, “The gilded class hoards resources while many struggle to make ends meet.”

19. Top 1%

The top 1% refers to the wealthiest individuals in a society who hold a disproportionate amount of wealth and power. This term is often used to highlight the extreme concentration of wealth and the disparities between the super-rich and the rest of the population.

  • For instance, “The top 1% control a significant portion of the world’s wealth.”
  • In a conversation about economic inequality, someone might say, “Policies should aim to address the wealth gap between the top 1% and the rest of society.”
  • A critic of wealth concentration might argue, “The top 1% has undue influence over politics and policies that favor their interests.”

20. Affluent

Affluent is a term used to describe individuals or groups who are financially well-off or have a high net worth. It typically refers to those who have a comfortable standard of living and can afford luxury or discretionary expenses.

  • For example, “The affluent neighborhood is known for its large mansions and expensive cars.”
  • In a discussion about consumer trends, someone might say, “Luxury brands target the affluent market segment.”
  • A financial advisor might suggest, “Investing in real estate can help grow the wealth of affluent individuals.”

21. Well-off

This term refers to someone who is wealthy or has a high income. It suggests that the person is financially secure and has a comfortable lifestyle.

  • For example, “He comes from a well-off family and never has to worry about money.”
  • In a discussion about economic inequality, someone might say, “The well-off have more opportunities and advantages in society.”
  • A person might describe their own financial status by saying, “I consider myself well-off compared to others.”

22. Loaded

This slang term is used to describe someone who is extremely rich or has a significant amount of money. It implies that the person has an abundance of wealth and resources.

  • For instance, “He drives a fancy sports car and lives in a mansion – he’s loaded.”
  • In a conversation about luxury goods, someone might say, “Only the loaded can afford those designer handbags.”
  • A person might envy someone’s wealth by saying, “I wish I were as loaded as that guy.”

23. Born on third base

This phrase is used to describe someone who was born into a wealthy or privileged family. It suggests that the person started life with many advantages and opportunities already in place.

  • For example, “He didn’t have to work hard for his success – he was born on third base.”
  • In a discussion about social mobility, someone might say, “Those born on third base have a head start in life.”
  • A person might criticize someone’s lack of understanding by saying, “They were born on third base and think they hit a triple.”

24. Moneyed elite

This term refers to the wealthy upper class or the elite who have significant financial resources. It suggests a group of individuals who have access to power and influence due to their wealth.

  • For instance, “The moneyed elite control much of the country’s economy.”
  • In a conversation about income inequality, someone might say, “The gap between the moneyed elite and the working class is widening.”
  • A person might aspire to join the moneyed elite by saying, “I’m working hard to become part of the upper class.”

25. Haves

This slang term is used to refer to individuals who possess wealth, privilege, or advantageous circumstances. It implies that these individuals have more than others and enjoy a higher social status.

  • For example, “The haves continue to accumulate wealth while the have-nots struggle to make ends meet.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, someone might say, “The haves benefit from a system that favors the wealthy.”
  • A person might criticize someone’s lack of empathy by saying, “They’re part of the haves and can’t understand the struggles of the have-nots.”

26. Silver-spoon-fed

This term refers to someone who has grown up in a wealthy or privileged family. It implies that they have been given many advantages and opportunities due to their family’s wealth or social status.

  • For example, “He’s always had everything handed to him on a silver spoon.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, someone might say, “The silver-spoon-fed kids have no idea what it’s like to struggle.”
  • A person criticizing a wealthy individual might comment, “She’s so out of touch with reality because she’s been silver-spoon-fed her whole life.”

27. Upper echelon

This term refers to the highest level or rank within a social hierarchy. It is often used to describe the elite or privileged class in society.

  • For instance, “Only those in the upper echelon of society can afford to live in such luxury.”
  • In a discussion about access to resources, someone might say, “The upper echelon hoards wealth while the rest of us struggle.”
  • A person praising a successful individual might comment, “He’s worked hard to rise to the upper echelon of his industry.”

28. Moneyed set

This term refers to a group of individuals who are wealthy or have significant financial resources. It implies that they have a certain level of privilege and access to opportunities due to their wealth.

  • For example, “The moneyed set always goes on extravagant vacations.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The moneyed set continues to accumulate wealth while the rest of us struggle.”
  • A person describing a social event might comment, “The party was filled with the moneyed set, dressed in designer clothing.”

29. Well-to-do

This term describes someone who is financially well-off or prosperous. It suggests that they have a comfortable lifestyle and enjoy certain privileges due to their wealth.

  • For instance, “She comes from a well-to-do family.”
  • In a discussion about economic disparities, someone might say, “The well-to-do have no idea what it’s like to live paycheck to paycheck.”
  • A person complimenting a friend’s success might comment, “You’ve worked hard to become well-to-do.”

30. Patrician

This term refers to someone who belongs to the highest social class or nobility. It implies that they have inherited wealth and privilege, often with a sense of refinement or sophistication.

  • For example, “The patricians of society attend exclusive social events.”
  • In a discussion about social mobility, someone might say, “It’s difficult for those without patrician connections to advance in certain industries.”
  • A person admiring someone’s elegance might comment, “She carries herself with the grace of a true patrician.”

31. Gated community

A gated community refers to a residential area that is enclosed within walls or fences and has controlled access points. These communities are often associated with wealth and privilege, as they provide a sense of security and exclusivity.

  • For example, “She lives in a gated community with private security.”
  • A person discussing housing inequality might say, “Gated communities contribute to the segregation of wealth.”
  • Someone might comment, “Gated communities can be a symbol of social status and privilege.”

32. Country clubber

A country clubber refers to someone who is a member or frequent visitor of a country club. Country clubs are exclusive establishments that offer various recreational activities such as golf, tennis, and swimming. Being a country clubber is often associated with wealth and social status.

  • For instance, “He’s a country clubber who enjoys playing golf every weekend.”
  • In a conversation about leisure activities, someone might mention, “Country clubbers have access to luxurious amenities.”
  • A person discussing class divisions might say, “Country clubbers often have access to opportunities that others don’t.”

33. Blue blooded

Being blue blooded refers to having a noble or aristocratic lineage. The term originated from the belief that the veins of aristocrats appeared bluer due to their fair skin and lack of hard physical labor. It is used to describe individuals who come from privileged backgrounds or have a high social status.

  • For example, “She comes from a blue blooded family with a long history of wealth and influence.”
  • In a discussion about social hierarchy, someone might say, “Blue blooded individuals often have access to exclusive networks and opportunities.”
  • A person commenting on inherited wealth might note, “Blue blooded families often pass down their fortunes through generations.”

34. Old money

Old money refers to wealth that has been passed down through generations. It specifically refers to families or individuals who have had wealth and privilege for a long time, often dating back to previous centuries. Old money is associated with established social status and is seen as more prestigious than new wealth.

  • For instance, “He comes from old money and has never had to worry about financial stability.”
  • In a conversation about class divisions, someone might mention, “Old money families often have influential connections.”
  • A person discussing societal advantages might say, “Old money individuals have access to resources and opportunities that others don’t.”

35. Nouveau riche

Nouveau riche refers to individuals who have recently acquired wealth, often through business success or sudden financial gain. The term is used to describe people who are new to wealth and may not have the established social status or cultural refinement associated with old money.

  • For example, “She’s part of the nouveau riche after her startup became successful.”
  • In a discussion about social mobility, someone might say, “The nouveau riche often face challenges in navigating high society.”
  • A person commenting on conspicuous consumption might note, “Nouveau riche individuals often flaunt their newfound wealth through lavish displays.”

36. Haves and have-nots

This phrase is used to describe the division between the rich or privileged individuals and those who are less fortunate.

  • For example, a discussion about income inequality might mention, “The haves and have-nots in our society are becoming more polarized.”
  • In a conversation about access to education, someone might say, “The haves and have-nots in our school system are evident.”
  • A news article might discuss, “The growing wealth gap between the haves and have-nots in America.”

37. Wealthy

This term refers to those who have accumulated a large amount of wealth or have a high income.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She comes from a wealthy family.”
  • In a discussion about economic disparities, someone might argue, “The wealthy should be taxed more to support social programs.”
  • A news headline might read, “New study shows the growing wealth gap between the wealthy and the rest of society.”

38. Privileged elite

This term is used to describe the select few who have access to resources, opportunities, and privileges that are not available to the majority of people.

  • For example, a critic might say, “The policies of the privileged elite only benefit the wealthy.”
  • In a conversation about social mobility, someone might argue, “Breaking into the privileged elite is extremely difficult for those without connections.”
  • A news article might discuss, “Protests against the privileged elite and calls for more equitable distribution of resources.”

39. Privilege check

This term is often used in social justice discussions to encourage individuals to recognize their own privilege and the ways in which it may influence their experiences and opportunities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to do a privilege check and examine the ways in which my background has given me advantages.”
  • In a workshop on diversity and inclusion, participants might engage in a privilege check exercise to foster self-awareness.
  • A social media post might read, “Take a moment to do a privilege check and consider how your experiences may differ from others.”

40. Privilege walk

This activity involves participants physically moving forward or backward based on statements or prompts that reflect various forms of privilege or disadvantage.

  • For example, during a privilege walk, participants might step forward if they have never experienced homelessness or take a step back if they have faced discrimination based on their race.
  • In a workshop on social justice, a facilitator might lead a privilege walk to illustrate systemic inequalities.
  • A school might organize a privilege walk as part of a diversity and inclusion initiative.
See also  Top 7 Slang For Clingy – Meaning & Usage