Top 50 Slang For Produces – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing fresh fruits and vegetables, there’s a whole world of slang for produces that can leave you feeling a bit lost. Luckily, we’ve got your back. Our team has scoured the markets and kitchens to bring you a list of the trendiest and most essential produce slang terms out there. Get ready to elevate your foodie vocabulary and impress your friends with these juicy tidbits!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Crank out

This phrase is used to describe the act of producing something quickly and in large quantities. It implies a sense of efficiency and productivity.

  • For example, a journalist might write, “The author is known to crank out multiple novels in a year.”
  • A factory worker might say, “We need to crank out these products to meet the demand.”
  • A musician might boast, “I can crank out a new song in just a few hours.”

2. Churn out

This phrase is used to describe the act of producing something in a rapid and repetitive manner, often with little regard for quality or originality.

  • For instance, a movie critic might write, “The studio churns out formulaic action films year after year.”
  • A writer might say, “I can churn out articles on any topic in record time.”
  • A chef might comment, “This restaurant churns out hundreds of meals a night.”

3. Pump out

This phrase is used to describe the act of producing or creating something quickly and effortlessly. It conveys a sense of ease and efficiency.

  • For example, a graphic designer might say, “I can pump out high-quality designs in no time.”
  • A content creator might boast, “I can pump out engaging videos every week.”
  • A software developer might comment, “Our team can pump out new features with ease.”

4. Spit out

This phrase is used to describe the act of producing or generating something rapidly and forcefully. It implies a sense of speed and intensity.

  • For instance, a printer technician might say, “This printer can spit out 100 pages per minute.”
  • A writer might comment, “I can spit out a first draft of an article in just a few hours.”
  • A machine operator might boast, “I can spit out finished products faster than anyone else.”

5. Roll out

This phrase is used to describe the act of introducing or releasing something gradually or in stages. It suggests a strategic and planned approach to production.

  • For example, a company executive might say, “We will roll out the new product line over the next few months.”
  • A software developer might comment, “We’re planning to roll out updates to the app every week.”
  • A marketing manager might discuss, “Our campaign will roll out in different markets over the course of the year.”

6. Bang out

This phrase is often used to describe creating or completing something quickly or efficiently.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I can bang out a dozen cupcakes in no time.”
  • A writer might say, “I need to bang out this article before the deadline.”
  • A musician might say, “I can bang out a new song in just a few hours.”

7. Cook up

This phrase is often used to describe creating or inventing something, usually in a creative or imaginative way.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “I can cook up a delicious meal with just a few ingredients.”
  • A writer might say, “I’m going to cook up a story that will captivate readers.”
  • A scientist might say, “I’m going to cook up an experiment to test this hypothesis.”

8. Whip up

This phrase is often used to describe creating something quickly or spontaneously, often in the kitchen.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I can whip up a gourmet meal in just 30 minutes.”
  • A host might say, “I can whip up some appetizers for the party.”
  • A bartender might say, “I can whip up a delicious cocktail with just a few ingredients.”

9. Knock out

This phrase is often used to describe creating or producing something quickly and efficiently.

  • For instance, a designer might say, “I can knock out a logo in just a few hours.”
  • A builder might say, “I can knock out a wall to create an open floor plan.”
  • A writer might say, “I can knock out a draft of this article in no time.”

10. Dash off

This phrase is often used to describe quickly writing or creating something without much effort.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I can dash off a poem in just a few minutes.”
  • An artist might say, “I can dash off a sketch in no time.”
  • A musician might say, “I can dash off a catchy tune in just a few minutes.”

11. Bash out

To create or produce something quickly or hastily. The term “bash out” suggests a sense of urgency or speed in the production process.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to bash out this article before the deadline.”
  • In a creative setting, someone might say, “Let’s bash out some ideas for the new project.”
  • A musician might say, “I always like to bash out a few chords when I’m feeling inspired.”

12. Hammer out

To work through and resolve a problem or issue. The term “hammer out” implies a process of negotiation or intense discussion to reach a final agreement or solution.

  • For instance, a team of professionals might say, “We need to hammer out the details of this project.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We’re meeting tomorrow to hammer out the contract terms.”
  • A group of friends planning a trip might say, “Let’s get together and hammer out the itinerary.”

13. Craft out

To create or produce something with skill, care, and attention to detail. The term “craft out” emphasizes the craftsmanship and artistry involved in the production process.

  • For example, an artist might say, “I spent hours crafting out this painting.”
  • In a DIY project, someone might say, “I’m going to craft out a unique piece of furniture.”
  • A chef might say, “I love to craft out new recipes in the kitchen.”

14. Draft up

To create or produce a preliminary version of a document or plan. The term “draft up” suggests the initial stages of creation or preparation.

  • For instance, a lawyer might say, “I’ll draft up the contract for you to review.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “I’m going to draft up a rough outline for my next novel.”
  • A student might say, “I need to draft up my essay before I start writing the final version.”

15. Brew up

To create or develop something, often with a sense of brewing or simmering. The term “brew up” implies a process of combining ingredients or ideas to create something new or unique.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “I’m going to brew up a new formula in the lab.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “I have some ideas brewing up in my mind for a new artwork.”
  • A chef might say, “Let’s brew up a delicious new recipe using these fresh ingredients.”

16. Grind out

To “grind out” means to produce something through persistent and often difficult work. It implies that the result is achieved through continuous effort and determination.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I had to grind out my latest article in order to meet the deadline.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve been grinding out assignments all week.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage their team to “grind out a win” by putting in extra effort and overcoming challenges.
See also  Top 25 Slang For Habit – Meaning & Usage

17. Thrust out

To “thrust out” means to produce or present something suddenly and forcefully. It implies a rapid and often unexpected production or release.

  • For instance, a musician might “thrust out” a new album by surprise, without any prior announcement.
  • A company might “thrust out” a new product into the market,“thrust out” a new product into the market, catching consumers off guard.
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “She just thrust out her opinion without considering the consequences.”

18. Squeeze out

To “squeeze out” means to produce something with difficulty or effort. It implies a struggle or challenge in achieving the desired result.

  • For example, a small business owner might say, “I had to squeeze out every dollar to keep my business running.”
  • A chef might say, “I managed to squeeze out a delicious meal with the limited ingredients.”
  • In a creative context, an artist might say, “I had to squeeze out inspiration for my latest project.”

19. Push out

To “push out” means to produce and release something, often in a continuous or ongoing manner.

  • For instance, a company might “push out” regular updates to their software to improve functionality.
  • A content creator might “push out” new videos or articles on a consistent basis.
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to push out more products to meet the demand.”

20. Generate

To “generate” means to produce or create something, often with the intention of bringing it into existence.

  • For example, a power plant generates electricity to meet the needs of a community.
  • A software program can generate reports or data analysis.
  • In a scientific context, researchers might generate new theories or hypotheses based on their experiments.

21. Manufacture

This term refers to the process of producing goods on a large scale, typically using machinery and labor. It can also be used to describe the act of creating or producing something in general.

  • For example, “The company manufactures cars at its factory.”
  • In a discussion about the production of electronics, someone might say, “China is known for manufacturing a wide range of consumer electronics.”
  • A person talking about their artistic process might explain, “I like to manufacture my own jewelry using unique materials.”

22. Fabricate

To fabricate means to make or build something, often by assembling different components or materials. It can also be used to describe the act of creating or inventing something that is not true or genuine.

  • For instance, “The carpenter fabricated a beautiful wooden table.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “Some people believe that the moon landing was fabricated.”
  • A person discussing the process of creating artwork might explain, “I like to fabricate sculptures using found objects.”

23. Formulate

To formulate means to create or develop a plan, method, or strategy. It can also refer to the act of creating or preparing something, such as a recipe or formula.

  • For example, “The scientist formulated a hypothesis based on their research.”
  • In a discussion about skincare products, someone might say, “I’ve formulated my own line of organic skincare products.”
  • A person talking about their approach to problem-solving might explain, “I like to formulate a detailed plan before tackling a project.”

24. Create

To create means to bring something into existence or to cause something to happen. It can refer to the act of making or producing something, as well as the act of inventing or originating something new.

  • For instance, “The artist created a beautiful painting.”
  • In a conversation about entrepreneurship, someone might say, “I want to create my own successful business.”
  • A person discussing their writing process might explain, “I create characters and stories that resonate with readers.”

25. Develop

To develop means to gradually progress or advance something over time. It can refer to the act of growing, improving, or expanding something, whether it’s a product, a skill, or an idea.

  • For example, “The company is developing a new software application.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I’m working on developing my public speaking skills.”
  • A person talking about their career goals might explain, “I want to develop my leadership abilities and take on more responsibilities.”

26. Construct

To construct means to build or put together something, usually using various materials or parts. It can also refer to the process of creating or forming something.

  • For example, a builder might say, “I’m going to construct a new house on this plot of land.”
  • In a discussion about architecture, someone might mention, “The architect constructed a beautiful and innovative design.”
  • A DIY enthusiast might share, “I’m going to construct my own bookshelf using reclaimed wood.”

27. Build

To build means to create or construct something, usually by assembling various parts or materials. It can also refer to the process of developing or establishing something.

  • For instance, a carpenter might say, “I’m going to build a custom dining table for my client.”
  • In a conversation about software development, someone might mention, “We need to build a new feature for our app.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’m working on building a successful career.”

28. Make

To make means to create or produce something, often by combining or transforming materials or elements. It can also refer to the process of manufacturing or fabricating something.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I’m going to make a delicious pasta dish for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “The artist used various techniques to make this masterpiece.”
  • A person discussing entrepreneurship might mention, “I want to make a positive impact on society through my business.”

29. Produce

To produce means to generate or create something, often in a systematic or organized manner. It can also refer to the process of manufacturing or bringing something into existence.

  • For instance, a farmer might say, “I produce organic vegetables on my farm.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might mention, “This band produces great songs with meaningful lyrics.”
  • A person discussing film production might say, “The studio has produced several critically acclaimed movies.”

30. Craft

To craft means to create or make something skillfully and with attention to detail. It often implies a level of artistry or craftsmanship in the process of creation.

  • For example, an artisan might say, “I craft handmade leather goods.”
  • In a discussion about writing, someone might mention, “The author crafted a compelling narrative.”
  • A person discussing woodworking might say, “I enjoy crafting custom furniture pieces.”

31. Craft up

To craft or create something, often with skill or creativity.

  • For example, “I’m going to craft up a homemade gift for my friend’s birthday.”
  • A DIY enthusiast might say, “I love crafting up unique home decor.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you craft up a logo for my business?”

32. Forge out

To forge or produce something, often in a skilled or industrious manner.

  • For instance, “The blacksmith forged out a beautiful iron sculpture.”
  • A carpenter might say, “I can forge out a custom piece of furniture for you.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you forge out a prototype for this new product?”

33. Knock up

To quickly create or make something, often in a hasty or improvised manner.

  • For example, “I can knock up a simple meal with the ingredients in my pantry.”
  • A handy person might say, “I can knock up a makeshift shelf using some spare wood.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you knock up a quick PowerPoint presentation?”

34. Whack out

To produce or create something quickly and carelessly.

  • For instance, “I whacked out a last-minute report before the deadline.”
  • A painter might say, “I can whack out a quick sketch to show you my idea.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you whack out a simple design for this flyer?”

35. Bash up

To create or make something roughly or forcefully, often without much finesse.

  • For example, “I bashed up a makeshift table using some old crates.”
  • A chef might say, “I can bash up a quick salad with whatever ingredients we have.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you bash up a simple website for my new business?”

36. Pump up

To pump up something means to increase or enhance it, often in a physical or energetic way. It can also refer to boosting someone’s confidence or motivation.

  • For example, “I need to pump up my muscles before the competition.”
  • A coach might say, “Let’s pump up the team before the big game.”
  • Someone might encourage a friend by saying, “You’ve got this! Pump up your energy and go for it!”

37. Kick out

To kick out means to expel or remove someone or something from a place or situation. It can also refer to rejecting or dismissing someone.

  • For instance, “The bouncer kicked out the troublemaker from the club.”
  • A teacher might say, “If you don’t behave, I’ll have to kick you out of class.”
  • A manager might decide to kick out a problematic employee from the company.
See also  Top 42 Slang For Italian Gangster – Meaning & Usage

38. Hash out

To hash out means to discuss and resolve a problem or disagreement. It involves talking through the issue and finding a solution.

  • For example, “Let’s sit down and hash out our differences.”
  • Two friends might hash out their plans for a trip by discussing all the details.
  • A couple might need to hash out their relationship problems in order to move forward.

39. Thrash out

To thrash out means to resolve something through intense effort or struggle. It often involves heated discussions or arguments in order to reach a resolution.

  • For instance, “The team thrashed out their differences and came up with a new strategy.”
  • Business partners might need to thrash out a contract negotiation to reach a mutually beneficial agreement.
  • A group of friends might thrash out their vacation plans by debating various options.

40. Bash together

To bash together means to create something quickly or roughly, without much planning or precision. It can refer to making or assembling something in a hasty manner.

  • For example, “Let’s bash together a makeshift shelter using whatever materials we have.”
  • A chef might bash together a last-minute dish using whatever ingredients are available.
  • A team might need to bash together a presentation at the last minute due to unforeseen circumstances.

41. Dash out

This slang term is used to describe the act of quickly creating or producing something.

  • For example, “I need to dash out a report before the meeting.”
  • A writer might say, “I dashed out a few ideas for my next article.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “I dashed out a quick sketch of my design concept.”

42. Print out

To “print out” means to produce a physical copy of a document or file.

  • For instance, “I need to print out this contract for the meeting.”
  • A student might say, “I printed out my essay to hand in.”
  • In an office setting, someone might ask, “Can you print out these documents for me?”

43. Sculpt out

This slang term is used to describe the act of creating or forming something through sculpting.

  • For example, “The artist sculpted out a beautiful statue.”
  • A sculptor might say, “I sculpted out the details of the face.”
  • In a workshop, someone might ask, “Can you help me sculpt out this clay figure?”

44. Carve out

To “carve out” means to create or form something through carving.

  • For instance, “The woodworker carved out a intricate design.”
  • A pumpkin carver might say, “I carved out a spooky face for Halloween.”
  • In a culinary context, someone might say, “I carved out a beautiful fruit display.”

45. Mold out

This slang term is used to describe the act of creating or shaping something using a mold.

  • For example, “The artist molded out a clay sculpture.”
  • A baker might say, “I molded out the dough into the desired shape.”
  • In a manufacturing setting, someone might ask, “Can you help me mold out these plastic parts?”

46. Shape out

To understand or solve something, often through trial and error or by using one’s intuition or knowledge. The term “shape out” is a slang phrase that means to figure out or come to a conclusion.

  • For example, if someone is trying to solve a puzzle, they might say, “I need to shape out the solution.”
  • In a conversation about a complex problem, someone might say, “Let’s shape out a plan to tackle this issue.”
  • A person reflecting on their personal growth might say, “I’ve shaped out who I want to be in life.”

47. Design out

To carefully think about and create a detailed plan or strategy for something. The term “design out” is a slang phrase that means to plan out or organize.

  • For instance, if someone is organizing an event, they might say, “We need to design out the schedule.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might say, “Let’s design out the features and functionality.”
  • A person reflecting on their goals might say, “I’ve designed out my path to success.”

48. Build out

To physically or metaphorically construct or create something. The term “build out” is a slang phrase that means to construct or create.

  • For example, if someone is building a house, they might say, “We need to build out the foundation.”
  • In a conversation about a business, someone might say, “We need to build out our marketing strategy.”
  • A person reflecting on their personal projects might say, “I’ve built out a successful portfolio.”

49. Develop out

To expand or grow something, often in terms of ideas, skills, or relationships. The term “develop out” is a slang phrase that means to expand or grow.

  • For instance, if someone is developing a new software, they might say, “We need to develop out the features.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I want to develop out my leadership skills.”
  • A person reflecting on their career might say, “I’ve developed out a strong network of connections.”

50. Create out

To invent or produce something, often in a creative or artistic context. The term “create out” is a slang phrase that means to invent or produce.

  • For example, if someone is creating a painting, they might say, “I want to create out a masterpiece.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “Let’s create out a catchy melody.”
  • A person reflecting on their artistic endeavors might say, “I’ve created out a unique style.”