Top 20 Slang For Propose – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to popping the big question, the right words can make all the difference. Whether you’re planning to get down on one knee or send a heartfelt message, knowing the latest slang for propose can add a modern twist to this timeless gesture. Let us guide you through a list of trendy terms that will help you express your love in a fresh and exciting way.

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1. Pop the question

This slang phrase refers to the act of proposing marriage to someone. It is often used to describe the moment when someone asks their partner if they want to get married.

  • For example, “After dating for three years, John finally popped the question to Sarah.”
  • A friend might ask, “So, did he pop the question yet?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m so nervous to pop the question, but I know she’s the one.”

2. Put a ring on it

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of proposing marriage to someone. It implies that the person proposing will give their partner an engagement ring as a symbol of their commitment.

  • For instance, “After years of dating, he finally decided to put a ring on it.”
  • A friend might say, “If he really loves you, he’ll put a ring on it.”
  • Someone might ask, “When do you think he’ll put a ring on it?”

3. Get down on one knee

This slang phrase refers to the traditional act of kneeling down on one knee while proposing marriage. It is seen as a romantic gesture and a sign of respect.

  • For example, “He got down on one knee and asked her to marry him.”
  • A friend might say, “If he doesn’t get down on one knee, it’s not a real proposal.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did he get down on one knee? That’s so sweet!”

4. Ask for someone’s hand in marriage

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of asking someone’s parents or guardians for permission to marry their child. It is seen as a traditional and respectful gesture.

  • For instance, “Before proposing, he asked for her hand in marriage from her parents.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did he ask for her hand in marriage? That’s so old-fashioned!”
  • Someone might say, “I think it’s important to ask for someone’s hand in marriage as a sign of respect.”

5. Get hitched

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of getting married. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “They finally decided to get hitched after being together for years.”
  • A friend might say, “When are you two planning to get hitched?”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you excited to get hitched?”

6. Popping the big question

This phrase is often used to describe the act of proposing marriage to someone. It implies that the question being asked is significant and important.

  • For example, “He finally popped the big question and she said yes!”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you thought about popping the big question yet?”
  • In a romantic movie, a character might say, “I’ve been waiting for the right moment to pop the big question.”

7. Propose on bended knee

This phrase describes the traditional act of proposing marriage while kneeling down on one knee. It is seen as a romantic and chivalrous gesture.

  • For instance, “He planned to propose on bended knee during their vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you think it’s important to propose on bended knee?”
  • In a conversation about proposal stories, someone might share, “My partner surprised me by proposing on bended knee in front of our families.”

8. Ask for someone’s hand

This phrase is often used to describe the act of proposing marriage and asking for someone’s agreement to marry. It signifies seeking their acceptance and approval.

  • For example, “He asked for her hand in marriage and she happily accepted.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did he ask for your hand in a traditional way?”
  • In a discussion about cultural customs, someone might mention, “In some cultures, it is still customary for the groom to ask for the bride’s hand in marriage.”

9. Get engaged

This phrase describes the act of agreeing to marry someone and entering into an engagement. It signifies the intention to marry and the beginning of the wedding planning process.

  • For instance, “They got engaged after dating for two years.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping to get engaged soon.”
  • In a conversation about relationship milestones, someone might ask, “When did you get engaged?”

10. Get down on bended knee

This phrase is similar to “propose on bended knee” and refers to the act of kneeling down while asking for someone’s hand in marriage. It emphasizes the romantic and traditional gesture of proposing.

  • For example, “He got down on bended knee and asked her to marry him.”
  • A friend might exclaim, “I can’t believe he got down on bended knee!”
  • In a discussion about proposal ideas, someone might suggest, “You could always get down on bended knee at a romantic location.”

11. Propose marriage

This is a formal way of asking someone to marry you. It typically involves getting down on one knee and presenting a ring.

  • For example, “He took her out for a romantic dinner and then proposed marriage.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to propose marriage to my partner next month.”
  • Another might ask, “How did your partner react when you proposed marriage?”

12. Drop to one knee

This is a physical action that is often associated with proposing marriage. The person proposing will drop down to one knee before asking the question.

  • For instance, “He dropped to one knee and asked her to marry him.”
  • In a romantic movie, a character might say, “He dropped to one knee and presented her with a ring.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you think it’s necessary to drop to one knee when proposing?”

13. Ask the big question

This phrase is a euphemism for proposing marriage. It refers to the act of asking someone if they are willing to commit to a lifelong partnership.

  • For example, “He finally gathered the courage to ask the big question.”
  • A person might say, “I’m nervous about asking the big question, but I know it’s the right time.”
  • Another might ask, “How did you know it was the right moment to ask the big question?”

14. Get on one knee

Similar to “drop to one knee,” this phrase describes the physical action of getting down on one knee to propose marriage.

  • For instance, “He got on one knee and asked her to be his wife.”
  • In a romantic novel, a character might say, “He got on one knee and held out a ring.”
  • A person might ask, “What is the significance of getting on one knee when proposing?”

15. Bend the knee

While not specifically related to proposing marriage, this phrase can be used metaphorically to describe the act of getting down on one knee.

  • For example, “He bent the knee and pledged his allegiance to the queen.”
  • In a fantasy TV show, a character might say, “Bend the knee and swear fealty to your new ruler.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a difference between bending the knee and dropping to one knee when proposing?”

16. Propose matrimony

This phrase is a formal and traditional way to ask someone to marry you. It implies a serious commitment and a desire to enter into a lifelong partnership.

  • For example, “He got down on one knee and proposed matrimony to his girlfriend.”
  • A romantic might say, “I can’t wait to propose matrimony to the love of my life.”
  • Someone might ask, “Have you ever witnessed a propose matrimony in a public setting?”

17. Ask for someone’s hand in wedlock

This phrase is an old-fashioned and formal way to ask someone to marry you. It emphasizes the idea of seeking permission or approval from the person’s family or guardians.

  • For instance, “He asked for her hand in wedlock and received her father’s blessing.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “In the past, it was common for suitors to ask for a lady’s hand in wedlock.”
  • A traditionalist might argue, “Asking for someone’s hand in wedlock shows respect for their family and traditions.”

18. Propose a lifetime together

This phrase conveys a deep commitment and a willingness to build a future together. It implies a long-term partnership and a shared vision for the future.

  • For example, “He proposed a lifetime together, promising to always stand by her side.”
  • A romantic might say, “I want to propose a lifetime together and create a beautiful life with you.”
  • Someone might ask, “What are some creative ways to propose a lifetime together?”

19. Get down on one knee and ask

This phrase describes the act of physically getting down on one knee as a gesture of humility and respect while asking someone to marry you. It is seen as a traditional and romantic way to propose.

  • For instance, “He got down on one knee and asked his partner to marry him.”
  • In a discussion about proposal stories, one might say, “I love hearing about couples who got down on one knee and asked in a grand gesture.”
  • A hopeless romantic might dream of someone “getting down on one knee and asking for their hand in marriage.”
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20. Get on bended knee and ask

This phrase is similar to “get down on one knee and ask” and describes the act of bending one knee as a sign of respect and submission while proposing marriage. It is another traditional and romantic way to propose.

  • For example, “He got on bended knee and asked his partner to spend the rest of their lives together.”
  • A person discussing proposal traditions might say, “In some cultures, it is customary for the suitor to get on bended knee and ask for the person’s hand.”
  • A romantic might fantasize about someone “getting on bended knee and asking for their eternal love.”