Top 38 Slang For Protect – Meaning & Usage

In a world where online security and personal safety are paramount, it’s crucial to stay in the know about the latest slang for protect. Whether you’re looking to upgrade your cybersecurity game or simply want to understand the language of self-defense, we’ve got you covered. From phrases that will help you navigate the digital landscape to terms that will keep you safe on the streets, our listicle is a must-read for anyone looking to stay one step ahead. So buckle up, because we’re about to take you on a ride through the top slang for protect that you won’t want to miss!

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1. Shield

A shield is a defensive tool used to protect oneself or others from harm. It is often made of a hard material like metal or plastic and is held in front of the body as a barrier.

  • For instance, a knight might use a shield to defend against sword attacks.
  • In a video game, a character might equip a shield to increase their defense.
  • A police officer might hold up their shield to protect themselves during a riot.

2. Guard

A guard is a person or thing that protects or watches over someone or something. It can refer to a security officer, a protective measure, or even a sports player assigned to defend a specific area or player.

  • For example, a security guard might patrol a building to prevent unauthorized entry.
  • In basketball, a player might be assigned to guard the opposing team’s best scorer.
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’ll be your guard and make sure you stay safe.”

3. Defend

To defend means to protect someone or something from harm or danger. It involves taking action to prevent an attack, preserve safety, or support a particular position or belief.

  • For instance, a lawyer might defend their client in a court of law.
  • In a debate, someone might defend their argument with evidence and reasoning.
  • A soldier might defend their country against an enemy invasion.

4. Safeguard

To safeguard means to protect or ensure the safety of someone or something. It involves taking precautions or implementing measures to prevent harm or damage.

  • For example, a lifeguard safeguards swimmers by watching over them and being ready to assist if necessary.
  • A company might implement cybersecurity measures to safeguard their customers’ personal information.
  • A parent might safeguard their child by teaching them about personal safety and setting boundaries.

5. Preserve

To preserve means to protect or maintain something in its original or existing state. It involves taking actions to prevent decay, damage, or loss.

  • For instance, a museum preserves artifacts by storing them in controlled environments and using conservation techniques.
  • A chef might preserve food by canning or pickling it to extend its shelf life.
  • A photographer might use archival materials to preserve their prints for future generations.

6. Secure

To ensure the safety or protection of something or someone. “Secure” can refer to physically locking or safeguarding an object or location, or it can mean taking measures to protect data or information.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to secure my bike with a strong lock.”
  • In the context of computer security, someone might say, “Make sure to secure your Wi-Fi network with a strong password.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I will secure the house before we go to bed.”

7. Shelter

To provide protection or refuge for someone or something. “Shelter” can refer to providing physical protection from the elements or offering emotional support during difficult times.

  • For instance, during a rainstorm, a person might say, “Let’s find shelter under that tree.”
  • In the context of animal welfare, someone might say, “We need to find a shelter for this stray dog.”
  • A friend might offer, “You can always come to my place for shelter if you need it.”

8. Cover

To protect or keep something or someone safe from harm or danger. “Cover” can refer to physically shielding or providing a barrier, or it can mean taking action to protect someone from negative consequences.

  • For example, a person might say, “Cover yourself with a blanket to stay warm.”
  • In the context of insurance, someone might say, “Make sure your policy covers all potential risks.”
  • A friend might warn, “Don’t worry, I’ll cover for you if the boss asks about your absence.”

9. Screen

To protect or shield someone or something from harm or unwanted attention. “Screen” can refer to physically blocking or hiding from view, or it can mean filtering or monitoring information.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I will screen the calls and only answer if it’s important.”
  • In the context of privacy, someone might say, “Make sure to screen your social media profiles to protect your personal information.”
  • A parent might screen a movie before allowing their child to watch it, saying, “I need to make sure it’s appropriate for you.”

10. Watch over

To protect or supervise someone or something closely. “Watch over” implies a vigilant and protective presence, ensuring the safety and well-being of the subject.

  • For example, a person might say, “I will watch over the children while they play in the park.”
  • In the context of security, someone might say, “The security guard will watch over the premises during the night.”
  • A caregiver might assure a patient, “Don’t worry, I’ll be here to watch over you and make sure you’re comfortable.”

11. Ward off

To ward off means to repel or fend off something or someone, usually to prevent harm or danger. It can be used in both physical and metaphorical contexts.

  • For example, “She used a can of pepper spray to ward off the attacker.”
  • In a discussion about preventing illness, someone might say, “Taking vitamin C can help ward off a cold.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a figurative sense, saying, “I always carry a good luck charm to ward off bad luck.”

12. Fortify

To fortify means to strengthen or reinforce someone or something, usually to make it more resistant to harm or danger. It can be used in various contexts, including physical and emotional protection.

  • For instance, “He fortified his house with security cameras and alarms.”
  • In a discussion about building immunity, someone might say, “Eating a balanced diet can help fortify your immune system.”
  • A person might use this word metaphorically, saying, “I surround myself with positive people to fortify my mental well-being.”

13. Harbour

To harbour means to provide shelter or protection to someone or something, often in a secretive or clandestine manner. It can be used both literally and metaphorically.

  • For example, “The underground network harboured fugitives during the war.”
  • In a discussion about endangered species, someone might say, “Protected areas harbour various rare and threatened species.”
  • A person might use this term figuratively, saying, “I always find solace in books; they harbour stories that transport me to different worlds.”

14. Keep safe

To keep safe means to maintain someone or something in a secure or protected state, usually to prevent harm or danger. It is a straightforward phrase used in various contexts.

  • For instance, “She kept her valuables in a locked safe to keep them safe from theft.”
  • In a discussion about child safety, someone might say, “Always use car seats to keep your children safe in vehicles.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a metaphorical sense, saying, “I wear a helmet while cycling to keep my brain safe.”

15. Give sanctuary

To give sanctuary means to provide a safe haven or refuge to someone in need of protection, often in a legal or humanitarian context. It is a compassionate phrase that emphasizes the act of offering safety.

  • For example, “The church gave sanctuary to undocumented immigrants facing deportation.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife conservation, someone might say, “Creating protected areas gives sanctuary to endangered species.”
  • A person might use this term metaphorically, saying, “Music gives me sanctuary from the chaos of everyday life.”

16. Conceal

To hide or keep something or someone from being seen or known about. “Conceal” is often used to describe the act of hiding something in order to protect or keep it secret.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I need to conceal my true identity to complete this mission.”
  • In a discussion about privacy, someone might argue, “We should have the right to conceal our personal information.”
  • A person might say, “I need to conceal my emotions so no one knows how I really feel.”

17. Provide refuge

To offer a safe place or protection to someone in need. “Provide refuge” is commonly used to describe the act of giving shelter or support to those who are seeking safety or protection.

  • For instance, a country might provide refuge to refugees fleeing war or persecution.
  • In a discussion about humanitarian efforts, someone might say, “We need to provide refuge to those affected by natural disasters.”
  • A person might argue, “It’s our duty as humans to provide refuge to those seeking asylum.”

18. Give asylum to

To offer legal protection and shelter to someone who is seeking refuge from persecution or danger in their home country. “Give asylum to” is often used to describe the act of granting official protection to individuals who are seeking safety or protection.

  • For example, a country might give asylum to political dissidents fleeing a repressive regime.
  • In a discussion about immigration policies, someone might say, “We should give asylum to those who are truly in need.”
  • A person might argue, “Countries have a moral obligation to give asylum to those fleeing war and violence.”

19. Hide

To keep something or someone out of sight or hidden from view. “Hide” is a general term used to describe the act of concealing or covering up something or someone to protect them from harm or discovery.

  • For instance, a child might hide their favorite toy under their bed to keep it safe.
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, someone might say, “I’m going to hide behind that tree.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hide my true feelings so no one knows how upset I am.”

20. Relieve

To ease or lessen the burden or suffering of someone or something. “Relieve” is often used to describe the act of providing comfort, assistance, or protection to someone in need.

  • For example, a pain reliever can relieve a headache or body ache.
  • In a discussion about stress management, someone might say, “Taking a walk can relieve stress.”
  • A person might argue, “Helping others in need can relieve their suffering and bring them comfort.”

21. Lodge

To lodge means to provide shelter or protection for someone or something. It can also refer to seeking refuge or finding a place to stay safe.

  • For example, “The hiker lodged in a cave to escape the storm.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness, someone might say, “We need to find ways to lodge those who are sleeping on the streets.”
  • A person describing a safe haven might say, “This cabin will lodge us for the night, away from the dangers of the wilderness.”

22. Support

To support means to back up or defend someone or something. It implies providing assistance or standing up for someone’s rights or beliefs.

  • For instance, “I will always support my friends no matter what.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “I support this policy because it will benefit the majority.”
  • A person discussing a controversial topic might say, “I support their right to free speech, even if I disagree with their views.”

23. Stick up for (informal)

To stick up for someone means to defend or protect them, especially in a challenging or confrontational situation. It implies taking a stand and supporting someone’s position or rights.

  • For example, “She always sticks up for her little sister when others try to bully her.”
  • In a workplace dispute, a colleague might say, “I will stick up for you and make sure your side of the story is heard.”
  • A person describing a loyal friend might say, “He’s always there to stick up for me, no matter what.”

24. Look after

To look after someone or something means to take care of or protect them. It implies assuming responsibility and ensuring their well-being.

  • For instance, “Can you look after my dog while I’m on vacation?”
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might say, “It’s important to look after your children’s physical and emotional needs.”
  • A person describing a reliable friend might say, “She always looks after me when I’m feeling down.”

25. Save

To save means to rescue or protect someone or something from harm or danger. It implies taking action to prevent harm or loss.

  • For example, “The lifeguard saved the drowning swimmer.”
  • In a conversation about environmental conservation, someone might say, “We need to save the planet for future generations.”
  • A person describing a hero might say, “He risked his life to save others during the fire.”

26. Care for

To take responsibility for someone or something’s well-being and ensure their safety and protection. “Care for” implies providing support and attending to the needs of the person or thing being protected.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I will always care for my children and keep them safe.”
  • A pet owner might say, “I care for my dog by making sure he gets regular exercise and proper nutrition.”
  • In a conversation about environmental conservation, someone might say, “We need to care for our planet and protect it for future generations.”

27. Foster

To provide a supportive and protective environment for the growth and development of someone or something. “Foster” suggests creating conditions that allow for the flourishing and well-being of the person or thing being protected.

  • For instance, a foster parent might say, “We foster children who are in need of a stable and loving home.”
  • A teacher might say, “My goal is to foster a love of learning and curiosity in my students.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife conservation, someone might argue, “We must foster the natural habitats of endangered species to ensure their survival.”

28. Assure

To provide a sense of confidence and certainty regarding the safety and protection of someone or something. “Assure” implies giving reassurance and making a commitment to safeguarding the well-being of the person or thing being protected.

  • For example, a security guard might say, “I assure you that the premises are secure and protected.”
  • A company might state, “We assure our customers that their personal information will remain confidential.”
  • In a conversation about emergency preparedness, someone might say, “Having a well-stocked emergency kit will assure your family’s safety during a crisis.”

29. Cushion

To provide a protective barrier or buffer that reduces the impact or severity of potential harm or danger. “Cushion” suggests creating a cushioning effect to absorb shocks and protect from injury or damage.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I want to cushion my child from the hardships of life.”
  • A person giving advice might say, “Save money to cushion yourself from unexpected expenses.”
  • In a discussion about workplace safety, someone might say, “Wearing protective gear can cushion the impact of accidents and prevent injuries.”

30. Insulate

To protect from external influences or adverse conditions by creating a barrier or insulation. “Insulate” implies isolating and safeguarding someone or something from potential harm or damage.

  • For example, a homeowner might say, “We insulated our house to keep it warm during the winter.”
  • A person discussing emotional well-being might say, “I try to insulate myself from negative influences and surround myself with positivity.”
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, someone might say, “Using strong passwords can help insulate your online accounts from hacking attempts.”

31. Harbor

To provide refuge or protection to someone or something. “Harbor” is often used metaphorically to describe protecting or providing a safe space for someone.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “You can always come to my house and harbor from the storm.”
  • In a conversation about supporting marginalized communities, someone might say, “We need to harbor those who are most vulnerable.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I will always harbor you from harm and keep you safe.”

32. Uphold

To support or defend a principle, belief, or standard. “Uphold” implies actively protecting and preserving something.

  • For example, a lawyer might argue, “We must uphold the rights of the accused.”
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might say, “It’s important to uphold moral values in all aspects of life.”
  • A supervisor might tell their team, “We need to uphold the company’s reputation for excellence.”

33. Buffer

To act as a barrier or protective shield between two things. “Buffer” is often used to describe providing a layer of protection or insulation.

  • For instance, in a conversation about noise reduction, someone might say, “We need to install soundproofing to buffer the noise.”
  • In a discussion about preventing conflicts, a mediator might be described as a “buffer” between two parties.
  • A person might say, “I use moisturizer to buffer my skin from the harsh weather.”

34. Deflect

To cause something to change direction or avoid a direct impact. “Deflect” is often used to describe protecting oneself or someone else from harm.

  • For example, in a martial arts class, the instructor might teach students how to deflect an opponent’s attack.
  • In a conversation about dealing with criticism, someone might say, “I learned how to deflect negative comments and focus on the positive.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “If someone tries to bully you, remember to deflect their words and walk away.”

35. Shield from

To protect or defend someone or something from potential harm or danger. “Shield from” implies actively preventing harm from reaching the protected entity.

  • For instance, a security guard might shield a celebrity from overzealous fans.
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, someone might say, “We need to shield our systems from hackers.”
  • A person might say, “I always carry an umbrella to shield myself from the rain.”

36. Keep from harm

This phrase means to take actions or precautions to prevent someone or something from being harmed or damaged.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “I will do whatever it takes to keep you from harm.”
  • A friend might offer, “I’ll keep an eye on your car to make sure it’s kept from harm while you’re away.”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might shout, “Stay behind me! I’ll keep you from harm!”

37. Keep under wraps

This slang phrase means to keep something hidden or secret, often referring to information or plans that are not yet ready to be revealed.

  • For instance, a filmmaker might say, “We’re keeping the plot of the movie under wraps to build suspense.”
  • A friend might tell another, “I have a surprise for you, but I’m keeping it under wraps until your birthday.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “The details of the new project are being kept under wraps until the official announcement.”

38. Keep out of harm’s way

This expression means to take actions to ensure someone or something is not put in a dangerous or harmful situation.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Stay close to me so I can keep you out of harm’s way.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s take a different route to keep ourselves out of harm’s way.”
  • In a war zone, a soldier might say, “Our mission is to keep civilians out of harm’s way and protect them from danger.”
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