Top 93 Slang For Really – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing emphasis, sometimes the word “really” just doesn’t cut it. Luckily, we’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang phrases to use in place of “really.” Whether you’re trying to convey excitement, astonishment, or sheer disbelief, this compilation of trendy expressions will have you speaking like a pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to take your vocabulary to the next level!

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1. hella

Used to emphasize the degree or intensity of something. “Hella” is commonly used in the West Coast of the United States.

  • For example, “That concert was hella good!”
  • A person might say, “I’m hella tired after staying up all night.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “This pizza is hella delicious!”

2. mad

Used to emphasize the intensity or extent of something. “Mad” is commonly used in urban slang and originated from African American Vernacular English (AAVE).

  • For instance, “That party was mad fun!”
  • A person might say, “I’m mad excited for the concert.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “You’re mad talented at playing the guitar!”

3. wicked

Used to emphasize the excellence, intensity, or extremity of something. “Wicked” is commonly used in New England, particularly in Massachusetts.

  • For example, “That roller coaster was wicked fast!”
  • A person might say, “I’m wicked tired after a long day of work.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “This burger is wicked delicious!”

4. mega

Used to emphasize the size, intensity, or power of something. “Mega” is derived from the Greek word for “great” and is often used in informal contexts.

  • For instance, “That concert was mega loud!”
  • A person might say, “I’m mega excited for the vacation.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “This ice cream is mega creamy!”

5. super

Used to emphasize the degree, quality, or intensity of something. “Super” is a widely used slang term.

  • For example, “That movie was super funny!”
  • A person might say, “I’m super tired after running a marathon.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “This dress is super cute!”

6. crazy

This word is used to emphasize the extreme nature of something. It is often used to describe something that is unbelievable or shocking.

  • For example, “That roller coaster was crazy! I’ve never been on anything like it.”
  • A person might say, “I had a crazy dream last night. It felt so real.”
  • Another might exclaim, “You won’t believe what happened to me today. It was crazy!”

7. freaking

This word is a euphemism for a stronger expletive and is used to intensify the meaning of another word. It is often used to express surprise, frustration, or emphasis.

  • For instance, “I’m freaking tired. I’ve been working all day.”
  • Someone might say, “That movie was freaking scary. I couldn’t sleep afterward.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m freaking out! I can’t find my keys anywhere!”

8. seriously

This word is used to convey sincerity or seriousness. It is often used to emphasize the truth or importance of something.

  • For example, “I seriously can’t believe she said that to me. It was so rude.”
  • A person might say, “I seriously need a vacation. I’m so stressed.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Seriously, this is the best pizza I’ve ever had. You have to try it!”

9. majorly

This word is used to emphasize the extent or importance of something. It is often used to describe something that has a big impact or influence.

  • For instance, “I majorly messed up on that test. I didn’t study at all.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s majorly talented. I’m always impressed by her work.”
  • Another might exclaim, “We’re majorly behind schedule. We need to pick up the pace!”

10. ultra

This word is used to describe something that is at the highest level or extreme. It is often used to emphasize the intensity or quality of something.

  • For example, “He’s an ultra-competitive athlete. He always gives 110%. “
  • A person might say, “I’m going for the ultra-marathon next year. It’s a 100-mile race.”
  • Another might exclaim, “That car is ultra-fast. It can go from 0 to 60 mph in just a few seconds!”

11. damn

Used to emphasize the intensity or extremity of something. It is often used in a negative or critical context.

  • For example, “That movie was damn boring.”
  • A person might say, “I’m damn tired after working all day.”
  • Another might exclaim, “That car is damn fast!”

12. awfully

Used to express a high degree or intensity of something. It is often used to convey a negative or unfavorable sentiment.

  • For instance, “She’s awfully rude.”
  • A person might say, “I’m awfully sorry for my mistake.”
  • Another might comment, “That’s an awfully long wait.”

13. incredibly

Used to describe something that is beyond what is considered normal or expected. It emphasizes the extraordinary nature of something.

  • For example, “He’s incredibly talented.”
  • A person might say, “The view from the top of the mountain is incredibly beautiful.”
  • Another might exclaim, “That cake is incredibly delicious!”

14. exceptionally

Used to emphasize that something is above average or stands out from the norm. It conveys a high degree of quality or excellence.

  • For instance, “She’s exceptionally intelligent.”
  • A person might say, “The service at that restaurant is exceptionally good.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s an exceptionally skilled musician.”

15. outrageously

Used to describe something that is beyond what is considered reasonable or acceptable. It conveys a sense of exaggeration or disbelief.

  • For example, “That price is outrageously high.”
  • A person might say, “She’s dressed outrageously for the party.”
  • Another might exclaim, “That joke was outrageously funny!”

16. intensely

This word is used to emphasize the degree or intensity of something. It means to do or experience something with great force or passion.

  • For example, “I am intensely focused on finishing this project before the deadline.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “He played intensely throughout the entire game.”
  • A person describing a thrilling experience might say, “The roller coaster was intensely exciting.”

17. excessively

This word is used to indicate that something is done or experienced to an extreme or unnecessary degree. It implies that there is too much of something or that it goes beyond what is considered normal or acceptable.

  • For instance, “He ate excessively and ended up feeling sick.”
  • Someone might say, “She spends excessively on clothes and shoes.”
  • A person describing a party might say, “The music was excessively loud.”

18. truly

This word is used to emphasize the truth or sincerity of something. It means that something is accurate, real, or sincere.

  • For example, “I truly believe in the power of positive thinking.”
  • Someone might say, “He is truly sorry for his actions.”
  • A person describing a work of art might say, “The painting is truly beautiful.”

19. absolutely

This word is used to indicate complete agreement or certainty. It means that something is completely true or accurate without any doubt.

  • For instance, “I absolutely love this new song.”
  • Someone might say, “She is absolutely right about the issue.”
  • A person describing a delicious meal might say, “The food was absolutely amazing.”

20. totally

This word is used to indicate complete agreement or agreement. It means that something is done or experienced in a complete or thorough manner.

  • For example, “I totally forgot about our meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “He is totally committed to his fitness routine.”
  • A person describing a shocking event might say, “I was totally surprised by the news.”

21. downright

This word is used to emphasize that something is completely or unequivocally true or extreme. It is often used to express strong agreement or emphasize a point.

  • For example, “That movie was downright amazing!”
  • In a conversation about a difficult task, someone might say, “It’s downright impossible to finish it on time.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m downright exhausted after running that marathon!”

22. immensely

This word is used to describe something that is of great degree or intensity. It is often used to emphasize how much someone enjoys or appreciates something.

  • For instance, “I’m immensely grateful for all the support.”
  • A person might say, “That concert was immensely entertaining.”
  • Someone might describe a book as, “An immensely captivating read.”

23. remarkably

This word is used to emphasize that something is unusually or surprisingly good or impressive. It is often used to highlight a notable quality or achievement.

  • For example, “She’s remarkably talented at playing the piano.”
  • In a conversation about a remarkable feat, someone might say, “That was a remarkably fast time.”
  • A person might comment, “The view from the top of the mountain was remarkably beautiful.”

24. undeniably

This word is used to express that something is unquestionably true or evident and cannot be denied or disputed. It is often used to emphasize the certainty or truth of a statement.

  • For instance, “He is undeniably the best candidate for the job.”
  • In a conversation about a remarkable achievement, someone might say, “It’s undeniably impressive.”
  • A person might state, “The evidence is undeniably clear.”

25. astonishingly

This word is used to describe something that is surprising or impressive in an unexpected way. It is often used to emphasize the shock or amazement caused by an event or situation.

  • For example, “She is astonishingly talented at playing the guitar.”
  • In a conversation about an unexpected outcome, someone might say, “He’s astonishingly fast for his age.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The magician’s tricks were astonishingly clever!”

26. unequivocally

This word is used to emphasize that something is absolutely true or certain. It expresses a high level of certainty or conviction.

  • For example, “I unequivocally believe that she is innocent.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “The evidence unequivocally supports my argument.”
  • A sports commentator might exclaim, “That was an unequivocal victory for the home team!”

27. genuinely

This word is used to describe something that is authentic, sincere, or true. It emphasizes that there is no falseness or pretense involved.

  • For instance, “He genuinely cares about the well-being of others.”
  • Someone might say, “I genuinely appreciate your help.”
  • A friend might comment, “She’s a genuinely talented artist.”

28. profoundly

This word is used to express a deep or intense level of something. It emphasizes the significance, impact, or extent of a particular feeling, experience, or quality.

  • For example, “The loss of a loved one can profoundly affect a person.”
  • A student might say, “I was profoundly moved by the professor’s lecture.”
  • Someone might describe a book as “profoundly thought-provoking.”
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29. unquestionably

This word is used to indicate that there is no doubt or uncertainty about something. It emphasizes that a certain fact or statement is beyond question.

  • For instance, “She is unquestionably the best candidate for the job.”
  • In a discussion, someone might assert, “The evidence unquestionably supports my point.”
  • A reviewer might state, “This film is unquestionably a masterpiece.”

30. Insanely

This word is used to intensify the meaning of an adjective or adverb, indicating that something is done or experienced to an extreme or excessive degree. It is often used in a colloquial or informal context.

  • For example, “That roller coaster was insanely fast!”
  • Someone might exclaim, “The concert was insanely good.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m insanely jealous of your vacation photos.”

31. Extremely

Used to emphasize the degree or intensity of something. It is often used to describe a high level of a particular quality or characteristic.

  • For example, “That movie was extremely funny!”
  • Someone might say, “I’m extremely tired after staying up all night.”
  • A person might comment, “The dessert was extremely delicious.”

32. Absurdly

Used to describe something that is extremely unreasonable, illogical, or exaggerated. It is often used to highlight the absurdity or silliness of a situation or action.

  • For instance, “The price for that item was absurdly high!”
  • A person might say, “She reacted absurdly to a simple question.”
  • Someone might comment, “The plot of that movie was ridiculously convoluted.”

33. Ridiculously

Used to emphasize that something is extremely excessive, extreme, or beyond what is considered normal or reasonable. It is often used to convey a sense of disbelief or astonishment.

  • For example, “He paid a ridiculously high price for that car.”
  • A person might say, “She is ridiculously talented at playing the piano.”
  • Someone might comment, “The amount of food they served at the party was incredibly generous.”

34. Stupidly

Used to describe an action or behavior that is extremely foolish, senseless, or lacking intelligence. It is often used to express frustration or annoyance towards someone’s irrational or illogical actions.

  • For instance, “He stupidly forgot to bring his passport to the airport.”
  • A person might say, “She acted stupidly by quitting her job without a backup plan.”
  • Someone might comment, “It’s idiotic to drive without wearing a seatbelt.”

35. Unbelievably

Used to express astonishment or disbelief at the extreme nature of something. It is often used to emphasize that something is beyond what is considered normal or expected.

  • For example, “The view from the top of the mountain was unbelievably beautiful.”
  • A person might say, “He has an unbelievably high IQ.”
  • Someone might comment, “The team made an incredibly unbelievable comeback in the game.”

36. Terribly

This word is used to emphasize the degree or intensity of something. It is often used to describe something negative or unpleasant.

  • For example, “That movie was terribly boring.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m terribly sorry for your loss.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m terribly hungry!”

37. Exceedingly

This word is used to emphasize that something is happening to a great extent or degree. It is often used to describe something positive or impressive.

  • For instance, “She is exceedingly talented.”
  • A person might say, “I am exceedingly grateful for your help.”
  • Someone might comment, “That cake is exceedingly delicious!”

38. Unusually

This word is used to describe something that is not typical or common. It is often used to highlight something that stands out or is out of the ordinary.

  • For example, “She has an unusually high IQ.”
  • A person might say, “That is an unusually large amount of money.”
  • Someone might comment, “He has an unusually deep voice.”

39. Extraordinarily

This word is used to emphasize that something is very unusual, remarkable, or exceptional. It is often used to describe something that is beyond what is ordinary or expected.

  • For instance, “She is an extraordinarily talented musician.”
  • A person might say, “That was an extraordinarily generous act.”
  • Someone might comment, “He has an extraordinarily good memory.”

40. Vastly

This word is used to emphasize that something is happening to a great extent or degree. It is often used to describe a significant difference or change.

  • For example, “Her knowledge on the subject vastly exceeded mine.”
  • A person might say, “The new technology has vastly improved our efficiency.”
  • Someone might comment, “The team’s performance has vastly improved since the last game.”

41. Uncommonly

This word is used to emphasize the degree or intensity of something. It means “to a great extent” or “exceptionally”.

  • For example, “She was uncommonly talented in playing the piano.”
  • A person might say, “That movie was uncommonly good, I highly recommend it.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult task, someone might say, “He was able to accomplish it in an uncommonly short amount of time.”

42. Abundantly

This word is used to describe something that is present in large quantities or to a great extent.

  • For instance, “The garden was abundantly filled with colorful flowers.”
  • A person might say, “I am abundantly grateful for the support of my friends and family.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business, someone might say, “They are abundantly profitable and have a strong customer base.”

43. Considerably

This word is used to emphasize a large or notable degree or extent of something.

  • For example, “He has considerably improved his tennis skills over the past year.”
  • A person might say, “The price of the product has decreased considerably since last month.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might say, “The difficulty level has increased considerably.”

44. Tremendously

This word is used to emphasize the magnitude or extent of something. It means “to a great extent” or “in a very large amount”.

  • For instance, “She has tremendously improved her singing abilities.”
  • A person might say, “The team’s effort was tremendously appreciated by the coach.”
  • In a discussion about a successful event, someone might say, “The turnout was tremendously high, exceeding our expectations.”

45. Inordinately

This word is used to describe something that is beyond what is considered normal or reasonable. It means “to an unusually or excessively great extent”.

  • For example, “He was inordinately excited about the upcoming vacation.”
  • A person might say, “The prices at that restaurant are inordinately high for the portion sizes.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might say, “The workload is inordinately heavy this week.”

46. Mightily

This word is used to emphasize the intensity or extent of something.

  • For example, “He was mightily impressed by her performance.”
  • A person might say, “I was mightily surprised by the outcome of the game.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s mightily talented, there’s no doubt about it.”

47. Staggeringly

This word is used to describe something that is extremely surprising or impressive.

  • For instance, “The view from the top of the mountain was staggeringly beautiful.”
  • A person might say, “The cost of that luxury car is staggeringly high.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The amount of food he can eat is staggeringly impressive!”

48. Monumentally

This word is used to emphasize the magnitude or importance of something.

  • For example, “The success of the new product was monumentally important for the company.”
  • A person might say, “The task ahead of us is monumentally challenging.”
  • Another might comment, “That mistake was monumentally stupid.”

49. Colossally

This word is used to describe something that is of enormous size, magnitude, or importance.

  • For instance, “The building was colossally tall.”
  • A person might say, “The project was colossally difficult.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The team’s effort was colossally impressive!”

50. Ineffably

This word is used to describe something that is so extraordinary or intense that it cannot be put into words.

  • For example, “The beauty of the sunset was ineffably breathtaking.”
  • A person might say, “The joy she felt was ineffably overwhelming.”
  • Another might comment, “The grief he experienced was ineffably deep.”

51. For real

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is true or genuine. It is often used to express sincerity or agreement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?”, you can respond, “For real, I wouldn’t miss it.”
  • In a conversation about a shocking event, someone might say, “For real, I can’t believe that happened.”
  • If someone is telling a funny story and you find it amusing, you can say, “For real, that’s hilarious!”

52. Deadass

This slang term is used to convey a high level of seriousness or genuineness. It can also be used to express surprise or disbelief.

  • For instance, if someone says something unbelievable, you might respond, “Deadass? That’s crazy!”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I deadass don’t know what to do.”
  • If someone is telling a heartfelt story and you want to show that you’re listening, you can say, “Deadass, that’s deep.”

53. Legit

This word is used to describe something that is true, real, or authentic. It can also be used to express agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone tells you a surprising fact, you might respond, “That’s legit!”
  • In a discussion about a popular product, someone might say, “I’ve tried it, and it’s legit.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a movie and you enjoyed it, you can say, “It’s legit, you should watch it.”

54. No cap

This phrase is used to emphasize that what you’re saying is true or honest. It is often used to express sincerity or to challenge someone’s disbelief.

  • For instance, if someone doubts your abilities, you might say, “I can do it, no cap.”
  • In a conversation about a strange experience, someone might say, “No cap, it was the weirdest thing.”
  • If someone asks if you’re being serious about something, you can respond, “No cap, I’m not joking.”

55. Fr

This abbreviation is used as a shorter form of “for real.” It is often used to express agreement or to emphasize the truthfulness of a statement.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re coming to a party, you can respond with “Fr, wouldn’t miss it.”
  • In a conversation about a shocking event, someone might say, “Fr, I can’t believe that happened.”
  • If someone shares an interesting fact and you find it surprising, you can say, “Fr, that’s crazy!”

56. Word

This slang term is used to emphasize that something is true or accurate. It can also be used to show agreement or approval.

  • For example, if someone says, “That party was amazing,” you can respond with, “Word!”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, you might say, “I heard it’s really good. Is that the word?”
  • If someone asks if you’re telling the truth, you can simply reply, “Word.”

57. On the real

This phrase is used to convey that something is being said or done in a serious or genuine manner. It can also be used to emphasize the truthfulness of a statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “On the real, I’m tired of all the drama,” they mean they genuinely feel exhausted by the drama.
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, you might say, “On the real, this is a tough decision to make.”
  • If someone questions the authenticity of your statement, you can assert, “No, I’m being on the real right now.”

58. No joke

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is not a joke or a lie. It can also be used to convey sincerity or seriousness.

  • For example, if someone says, “I just won the lottery,” you can respond with, “No joke? That’s amazing!”
  • In a discussion about a challenging task, you might say, “This project is no joke. It requires a lot of effort.”
  • If someone doubts the truthfulness of your statement, you can assure them, “I’m no joke. This really happened.”

59. Straight up

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is being said or done in a straightforward and honest manner. It can also be used to convey sincerity or agreement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I straight up forgot about the meeting,” they mean they honestly forgot.
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, you might say, “Straight up, I think everyone should have equal rights.”
  • If someone questions the sincerity of your statement, you can assert, “I’m being straight up with you right now.”

60. No doubt

This phrase is used to express certainty or agreement. It can also be used to convey confidence or approval.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’ll be there on time,” you can respond with, “No doubt!”
  • In a discussion about a talented musician, you might say, “She’s no doubt one of the best in the industry.”
  • If someone questions your agreement, you can assert, “No doubt about it, I’m on board.”

61. Fo’ shizzle

This phrase is a slang term that means “definitely” or “absolutely.” It originated from African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and gained popularity through hip-hop culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to the party tonight, fo’ shizzle!”
  • In a conversation about plans, a person might ask, “Are you coming to the game tomorrow?” and receive the response, “Fo’ shizzle!”
  • A friend might express agreement by saying, “Fo’ shizzle, that movie was amazing!”

62. On God

This phrase is used to emphasize the truthfulness or sincerity of a statement. It is often used in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and has gained popularity through social media and hip-hop culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I aced my exam, on God!”
  • In a conversation about a promise, a person might say, “I’ll be there on time, on God.”
  • A friend might express disbelief by saying, “You won the lottery? On God, that’s amazing!”

63. Bet

This word is a slang term that means “okay” or “agreed.” It is often used as a response to a statement or as a way to confirm plans.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s meet up at 5 pm, bet?” and receive the response, “Bet!”
  • In a conversation about a bet or challenge, a person might say, “I bet you can’t run a mile in under 5 minutes,” and the other person might respond, “Bet, I’ll prove you wrong!”
  • Friends might use this word to confirm plans by saying, “We’re going to the beach tomorrow, bet?”

64. On the level

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true, genuine, or honest. It originated in the early 1900s and is still used today.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m on the level, I didn’t cheat on the test.”
  • In a conversation about trust, a person might ask, “Can I trust you with this secret?” and the other person might respond, “I’m on the level, you can count on me.”
  • A friend might express their honesty by saying, “I’m being completely on the level with you, I didn’t take your money.”

65. No fooling

This phrase is used to emphasize that a statement or claim is serious and not a joke. It is often used to express sincerity or disbelief.

  • For example, someone might say, “I won the lottery, no fooling!”
  • In a conversation about a surprising event, a person might say, “No fooling, he actually climbed Mount Everest.”
  • Friends might use this phrase to express disbelief by saying, “You’re moving to Hawaii? No fooling, that’s incredible!”

66. For sure

This slang phrase is used to emphasize agreement or certainty. It means that something is absolutely true or will definitely happen.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?” you might respond, “For sure!”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll be there for sure, no doubt about it.”
  • Someone might declare, “I know I can count on you for sure.”

67. No kidding

This phrase is used to express surprise, disbelief, or to emphasize that something is true. It is often used in a sarcastic or ironic manner.

  • For instance, if someone tells you a surprising fact, you might respond, “No kidding!”
  • A friend might say, “I won the lottery, no kidding!”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I just saw a UFO, no kidding!”

68. Dead serious

This slang phrase is used to emphasize that someone is being completely serious or sincere about something.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’m dead serious, I saw a ghost last night,” it means they truly believe they saw a ghost.
  • A friend might say, “I’m dead serious, I’m quitting my job and starting my own business.”
  • Someone might declare, “I’m dead serious about getting in shape this year.”

69. Real talk

This phrase is used to indicate that what follows is a sincere and honest conversation or statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Real talk, you need to stop procrastinating,” they are giving you genuine advice.
  • A friend might say, “Real talk, I think you should break up with that person.”
  • Someone might declare, “Real talk, I’m really proud of you for achieving your goals.”

70. No word of a lie

This phrase is used to emphasize that what is being said is completely true and not a fabrication or exaggeration.

  • For example, if someone says, “No word of a lie, I saw a unicorn,” they are insisting that they actually saw a unicorn.
  • A friend might say, “No word of a lie, that was the best pizza I’ve ever had.”
  • Someone might declare, “No word of a lie, I’ve never been more scared in my life.”

71. No messing

This phrase means that something is serious or genuine, with no room for joking or playing around.

  • For example, if someone says, “I need your help, no messing,” they are emphasizing that they need serious assistance.
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “We need to find a solution, no messing around.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “This is a test, no messing about.”

72. On the straight and narrow

This phrase means to be on the right track or following the correct path, usually referring to a person’s behavior or actions.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I used to be involved in crime, but now I’m on the straight and narrow,” they mean that they have changed their ways and are now living a lawful life.
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I’m trying to stay on the straight and narrow and make positive choices.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Stay on the straight and narrow and you’ll achieve your goals.”

73. No pulling your leg

This phrase means that someone is being sincere and not joking or teasing.

  • For example, if someone says, “I really won the lottery, no pulling your leg,” they mean that they genuinely won the lottery and are not joking about it.
  • In a conversation about a surprising event, someone might say, “I saw a UFO last night, no pulling your leg.”
  • A friend might assure another friend, “I’m serious about helping you, no pulling your leg.”

74. No joshing

This phrase means that someone is not joking or kidding around.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I saw a ghost, no joshing,” they mean that they genuinely saw a ghost and are not joking about it.
  • In a discussion about a strange occurrence, someone might say, “I found a hidden treasure, no joshing.”
  • A person might tell their skeptical friend, “I’m telling you the truth, no joshing.”

75. On the up

This phrase means that something is improving or getting better.

  • For example, if someone says, “Business is on the up,” they mean that their business is experiencing growth and improvement.
  • In a conversation about someone’s health, a person might say, “They were sick, but now they’re on the up.”
  • A coach might encourage their team, saying, “Keep working hard, we’re on the up.”

76. No fooling around

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is not a joke or a playful matter. It indicates that the speaker is being sincere and not messing around.

  • For example, if someone says, “I need your help, no fooling around,” they are asking for serious assistance.
  • In a discussion about the seriousness of a situation, someone might say, “This is a matter of life and death, no fooling around.”
  • When trying to convey the importance of a task, one might say, “We need to get this done, no fooling around.”

77. On the straight

This phrase is used to express complete agreement or affirmation. It signifies that the speaker is being completely honest and straightforward.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’m on the straight about my feelings for you,” they are expressing their genuine emotions.
  • In a conversation about someone’s intentions, one might say, “He told me he’s on the straight about wanting to change.”
  • When assuring someone that they can trust you, you might say, “I’m on the straight with you, no hidden agenda.”

78. No pulling your chain

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker is not teasing or joking with the listener. It signifies that the statement being made is sincere and should be taken seriously.

  • For example, if someone says, “I really need your help, no pulling your chain,” they are asking for genuine assistance.
  • In a discussion about a serious matter, one might say, “This is a matter of national security, no pulling your chain.”
  • When trying to convey the urgency of a situation, someone might say, “We need to act now, no pulling your chain.”

79. No messing around

This phrase is used to emphasize that the speaker is being serious and not engaging in any playful or frivolous behavior. It indicates that the situation or statement being made is important and should be taken seriously.

  • For instance, if someone says, “We need to get to work, no messing around,” they are urging everyone to focus and be productive.
  • In a conversation about the importance of following rules, one might say, “This is a strict organization, no messing around.”
  • When trying to convey the gravity of a situation, someone might say, “This is a matter of life and death, no messing around.”

80. On the straight up

This phrase is used to express complete agreement or affirmation. It signifies that the speaker is being completely honest and straightforward.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’m on the straight up about my intentions,” they are being sincere about their motives.
  • In a conversation about someone’s honesty, one might say, “He told me he’s on the straight up about his past.”
  • When assuring someone that they can trust you, you might say, “I’m on the straight up with you, no hidden agenda.”

81. No kidding around

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is being said or done in a serious or genuine manner. It is often used to convey sincerity or truthfulness.

  • For example, “I’m no kidding around when I say this is the best pizza I’ve ever had.”
  • In a discussion about a serious topic, someone might say, “We need to address this issue, no kidding around.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their determination, saying, “I’m going to pass this test, no kidding around.”

82. For All Intents and Purposes

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being described in a way that captures its most important or essential qualities. It is often used to simplify or summarize a complex idea.

  • For instance, “For all intents and purposes, this project is complete.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might argue, “For all intents and purposes, the defendant is guilty.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to explain a situation, saying, “For all intents and purposes, we are a team.”

83. From the Bottom of One’s Heart

This phrase is used to express genuine or deep feelings of emotion or sincerity. It is often used to convey a strong sense of honesty or earnestness.

  • For example, “I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your support.”
  • In a heartfelt apology, someone might say, “I am truly sorry from the bottom of my heart.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their love, saying, “I love you from the bottom of my heart.”

84. Hands Down

This phrase is used to indicate that something is without a doubt or unquestionably true. It is often used to emphasize a strong belief or certainty.

  • For instance, “He is hands down the best player on the team.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “My argument is hands down the most persuasive.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their preference, saying, “Hands down, this is my favorite restaurant.”

85. In All Sincerity

This phrase is used to convey a genuine or truthful statement. It is often used to emphasize that something is being said with sincerity or without deception.

  • For example, “I can say in all sincerity that I have never seen such a beautiful sunset.”
  • In a serious conversation, someone might say, “In all sincerity, I think we should reconsider our options.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their true feelings, saying, “In all sincerity, I love you.”

86. In Essence

This phrase is used to emphasize the core or fundamental aspect of something. It implies that the following statement is a concise summary or the most important point.

  • For example, “In essence, the company’s success can be attributed to its innovative products.”
  • A person might say, “The movie is, in essence, a love story disguised as a thriller.”
  • In a political discussion, one might argue, “The policy, in essence, violates the rights of the citizens.”

87. Inarguably

This word is used to emphasize that something is unquestionably true or valid. It suggests that there is no room for disagreement or debate regarding the following statement.

  • For instance, “The team is inarguably the best in the league.”
  • A person might assert, “His talent is inarguably unmatched.”
  • In a scientific context, one might state, “The evidence inarguably supports the theory.”

88. No Huts, No Buts, No Coconuts

This phrase is used to emphasize certainty or agreement. It implies that there are no excuses, exceptions, or doubts about the following statement.

  • For example, “He will be there, no huts, no buts, no coconuts.”
  • A person might say, “You need to finish the project on time, no huts, no buts, no coconuts.”
  • In a discussion about commitments, one might assert, “If you promise, then it’s no huts, no buts, no coconuts.”

89. Obviously

This word is used to indicate that something is easily understood or seen. It suggests that the following statement is apparent or self-evident.

  • For instance, “Obviously, she was upset by his comments.”
  • A person might say, “Obviously, the solution to the problem is to increase funding.”
  • In a debate, one might argue, “Obviously, the data supports my position.”

90. Oh-So

This phrase is used to intensify the degree or extent of something. It implies that the following statement is even more significant or extreme than expected.

  • For example, “He’s oh-so talented at playing the piano.”
  • A person might say, “She’s oh-so close to achieving her goal.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, one might comment, “That dress is oh-so stylish.”

91. Uh-Huh

This is a casual and informal way of expressing agreement or affirmation. It is often used in conversation to show agreement or acknowledgment.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out for dinner?”, a person might respond with “Uh-huh” to indicate that they do.
  • In a conversation about a movie, one person might say, “I really enjoyed that film.” The other person might respond with “Uh-huh” to show agreement.
  • If someone is telling a story and says, “So I told him no, and he just walked away.” The listener might respond with “Uh-huh” to indicate that they are following the story.
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92. Without a Doubt

This phrase is used to emphasize a strong belief or certainty about something. It is often used to express complete agreement or confidence in a statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “She is the best player on the team, without a doubt,” they are emphasizing their belief that she is the best.
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “Without a doubt, we should choose option B. It’s the most logical choice.”
  • If someone asks, “Do you think we’ll win the game?” and the response is “Without a doubt,” it means the person is confident in their team’s ability to win.

93. You Don’t Say

This phrase is used to express surprise or sarcasm in response to something that is obvious or already known. It is often used to show that the speaker finds the information or statement to be unremarkable or unnecessary.

  • For example, if someone says, “Did you know that water is wet?” and the response is “You don’t say,” it means that the speaker finds the statement to be obvious.
  • In a conversation about a difficult task, one person might say, “It’s really hard to balance work and personal life.” The other person might respond with “You don’t say” to imply that they already knew that.
  • If someone says, “I heard it’s going to rain tomorrow,” and the response is “You don’t say,” it means that the speaker finds the information to be unremarkable.