Top 56 Slang For Regret – Meaning & Usage

We’ve all been there – that sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach when you realize you’ve made a mistake. Regret is a universal emotion, and we’ve got the inside scoop on the latest slang terms used to describe that all-too-familiar feeling. Join us as we uncover the top slang for regret that’s taking the internet by storm. Get ready to laugh, cringe, and maybe even relate a little too much to these expressions of hindsight.

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1. FOMO

This term describes the anxiety or unease that comes from feeling like you’re missing out on something exciting or interesting happening elsewhere. It often refers to the fear of missing out on social events or experiences.

  • For example, a person might say, “I didn’t go to the party because I had major FOMO.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Feeling major FOMO seeing all the pictures from the concert.”
  • A friend might invite you to an event and say, “Don’t have FOMO, it’s going to be amazing!”

2. Shoulda Woulda Coulda

This phrase is a colloquial way of expressing regret or hindsight about a past decision or action. It emphasizes the feeling of missed opportunities or the belief that things could have been different if different choices were made.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I shoulda woulda coulda taken that job offer when I had the chance.”
  • Someone might reflect on a failed relationship and say, “I shoulda woulda coulda been more honest with my feelings.”
  • A friend might give advice and say, “Don’t live with shoulda woulda coulda, take risks and go after what you want!”

3. Regerts

This term is a humorous misspelling of the word “regrets” and is often used to poke fun at someone’s past mistakes or regrets. It’s typically used in a lighthearted or self-deprecating manner.

  • For example, a person might post a picture of a poorly done tattoo and caption it, “No regerts!”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I have a lot of regerts about my fashion choices in high school.”
  • A friend might bring up an embarrassing memory and say, “Remember that time you spilled coffee on yourself? Regerts, huh?”

4. Ragrets

Similar to “regerts,” this term is another misspelling of the word “regrets” and is often used humorously to show a nonchalant or rebellious attitude towards past mistakes or regrets.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have no ragrets about dropping out of college. It was the best decision I ever made.”
  • Someone might get a tattoo with a purposely misspelled word and say, “I got ‘ragrets’ inked on my arm to remind myself not to take life too seriously.”
  • A friend might share a funny story about a regretful experience and say, “I have a few ragrets from that wild vacation, but it was totally worth it!”

5. I should have known better

This phrase expresses regret or disappointment in oneself for not having made a better decision or judgment based on prior knowledge or experience. It implies that the person had the information or insight to make a better choice but failed to do so.

  • For example, a person might say, “I should have known better than to trust that person.”
  • Someone might reflect on a financial mistake and say, “I should have known better than to invest in that risky scheme.”
  • A friend might give advice and say, “Learn from your past mistakes and trust your instincts. You should have known better, but now you do!”

6. Kick myself

This phrase is used when someone is angry or disappointed with themselves for making a mistake or missing an opportunity.

  • For example, “I forgot to buy a lottery ticket and now I’m kicking myself because my numbers came up.”
  • A person might say, “I really kicked myself for not studying harder for the exam.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might admit, “I kick myself for not pursuing my dream job when I had the chance.”

7. Cry over spilt milk

This phrase means to dwell on past mistakes or regrets instead of moving forward.

  • For instance, “There’s no use crying over spilt milk. We can’t change what happened.”
  • A person might say, “I know I made a mistake, but there’s no point in crying over spilt milk.”
  • In a discussion about missed opportunities, someone might advise, “Don’t cry over spilt milk. Focus on what you can do now.”

8. Live and learn

This phrase means to accept and learn from past mistakes or regrets in order to grow and improve.

  • For example, “I made a bad investment, but I guess it’s all part of living and learning.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve made plenty of mistakes, but I try to live and learn from them.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might advise, “The key is to live and learn from your experiences, not dwell on your regrets.”

9. Bitter pill to swallow

This phrase is used to describe a situation or truth that is hard to accept or come to terms with.

  • For instance, “Losing the game was a bitter pill to swallow.”
  • A person might say, “Getting laid off was a bitter pill to swallow, but it pushed me to find a better job.”
  • In a discussion about personal failures, someone might admit, “It was a bitter pill to swallow when I realized I had wasted so much time.”

10. Hindsight is 20/20

This phrase means that it is easier to understand or evaluate a situation or decision after it has already occurred.

  • For example, “Hindsight is 20/20. I should have known better than to trust him.”
  • A person might say, “Looking back, I can see where I went wrong. Hindsight is 20/20.”
  • In a conversation about regrets, someone might admit, “Hindsight is 20/20. If I could go back, I would have made different choices.”

11. Guilt trip

A “guilt trip” is a manipulative tactic used to make someone feel guilty or responsible for something. It involves using emotional pressure or guilt to manipulate someone’s actions or decisions.

  • For example, “She always tries to guilt trip me into doing things for her.”
  • A person might say, “I hate when people try to guilt trip me into feeling bad about something.”
  • Another might comment, “My mom is the queen of guilt trips. She knows exactly how to make me feel guilty.”

12. Should have thought twice

This phrase is used to express regret or remorse for a decision that was made without careful consideration or thought. It implies that the person should have taken more time to think about the consequences or potential outcomes before making a choice.

  • For instance, “I should have thought twice before quitting my job.”
  • In a discussion about poor decisions, someone might say, “We all have moments where we should have thought twice.”
  • A person might reflect, “Looking back, I definitely should have thought twice about dating that person.”

13. Missed opportunity

A “missed opportunity” refers to a situation where someone fails to take advantage of a favorable or beneficial chance or occurrence. It often leads to feelings of regret or disappointment for not seizing the opportunity when it was available.

  • For example, “I had a chance to travel the world, but I missed the opportunity.”
  • A person might say, “I always regret missed opportunities. You never know what could have been.”
  • Another might comment, “Don’t let fear hold you back from seizing opportunities. You don’t want to have any missed opportunities in life.”

14. Bad call

This phrase is used to describe a decision that turned out to be unfavorable or unwise. It implies that the person made a mistake or error in judgment, resulting in regret or negative consequences.

  • For instance, “Breaking up with my ex was a bad call.”
  • In a discussion about regrettable choices, someone might say, “We’ve all made bad calls in life.”
  • A person might reflect, “Looking back, it was definitely a bad call to invest all my money in that business.”

15. Lost chance

A “lost chance” refers to a missed opportunity or moment that could have led to a positive outcome or experience. It conveys a sense of regret or sadness for not taking advantage of the chance when it was available.

  • For example, “I had a lost chance to meet my favorite celebrity when they came to town.”
  • A person might say, “I hate the feeling of a lost chance. It’s like a missed connection with destiny.”
  • Another might comment, “You never know when a lost chance will come back around. That’s why you have to seize every opportunity.”

16. Regretful decision

This refers to a decision or action that one wishes they hadn’t made. It implies a feeling of remorse or disappointment.

  • For example, “I made a regretful decision to drop out of college.”
  • Someone might say, “I have many regretful decisions from my past that I wish I could change.”
  • In a conversation about past mistakes, one might admit, “I’ve made some regretful decisions in relationships.”

17. Remorse

A feeling of deep regret or guilt for a past action or decision. It often involves a sense of responsibility for the consequences of one’s actions.

  • For instance, “He felt a deep sense of remorse after betraying his friend.”
  • In a discussion about forgiveness, someone might say, “Remorse is the first step towards redemption.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I have a lot of remorse for the way I treated people.”

18. Should’ve

A contraction of “should have,” indicating that one regrets not taking a particular action or making a different choice in the past.

  • For example, “I should’ve studied more for that test.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, someone might say, “I should’ve taken that job offer.”
  • A person reflecting on a past relationship might say, “I should’ve ended it sooner.”

19. Wishing I had

Expressing a strong desire to go back in time and make a different choice or take a different action. It implies a sense of longing or regret for a missed opportunity.

  • For instance, “I’m wishing I had pursued my passion instead of taking a safe job.”
  • In a conversation about past regrets, someone might say, “I’m wishing I had listened to my gut instinct.”
  • A person reflecting on a past mistake might say, “I’m wishing I had been more honest.”

20. Bummed out

Feeling down or disappointed about a situation or outcome. It implies a sense of regret or dissatisfaction.

  • For example, “I’m really bummed out that I didn’t get the promotion.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, someone might say, “I’m bummed out that I didn’t take that trip.”
  • A person reflecting on a past event might say, “I’m still bummed out about how things turned out.”

21. Regretful AF

This phrase is an abbreviation for “regretful as f***,” with the “AF” standing for a strong expletive. It is used to emphasize a deep sense of regret or remorse.

  • For example, “I am regretful AF that I didn’t study for the exam.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m regretful AF that I didn’t take that job offer.”
  • A person reflecting on past actions could say, “I’m regretful AF that I didn’t apologize sooner.”

22. Doh!

This term, popularized by the TV show The Simpsons, is used to express a moment of realization or acknowledgement of a mistake. It is often accompanied by a facepalm gesture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Doh! I forgot my keys at home.”
  • Another person might exclaim, “Doh! I accidentally sent that email to the wrong person.”
  • A character in a sitcom might say, “Doh! I can’t believe I locked myself out of the house.”

23. Facepalm

This term describes the act of slapping one’s forehead with the palm of the hand, usually in response to an action or statement that is foolish or embarrassing. It is often used to express frustration or disappointment.

  • For example, “I facepalmed when I realized I had been wearing my shirt inside out all day.”
  • Someone might say, “I facepalmed when my friend told me they had never heard of Beyoncé.”
  • A person might react to a cringe-worthy moment by saying, “I can’t help but facepalm at the sheer stupidity.”

24. In hindsight

This phrase is used to express the realization or understanding of something after the fact, often with a sense of regret for not recognizing it sooner.

  • For instance, “In hindsight, I should have listened to my parents’ advice.”
  • Someone might say, “In hindsight, I see now that I was being too impulsive.”
  • A person reflecting on a failed relationship might say, “In hindsight, I ignored all the warning signs.”

25. Crying over spilled milk

This phrase is used to describe the act of dwelling on past mistakes or regrets that cannot be undone. It implies that it is pointless to lament over something that has already happened.

  • For example, “Stop crying over spilled milk and focus on finding a solution.”
  • Someone might say, “There’s no use in crying over spilled milk. We just have to move forward.”
  • A person reflecting on a missed opportunity might say, “I know I can’t change the past, but I can’t help but cry over spilled milk.”

26. Doh

This is an interjection used to express disappointment or frustration when realizing a mistake or failure.

  • For example, if someone drops their phone, they might exclaim, “Doh!”
  • A person might say, “I forgot to bring my lunch to work today. Doh!”
  • Another might use it humorously, saying, “I accidentally put salt in my coffee instead of sugar. Doh!”

27. Womp Womp

This is an onomatopoeic phrase used to convey a sense of disappointment or failure.

  • For instance, if someone tells a joke that falls flat, someone might respond with, “Womp womp.”
  • A person might use it sarcastically, saying, “I got a B+ on my test. Womp womp.”
  • Another might say, “I was hoping for a promotion, but I didn’t get it. Womp womp.”

28. Epic Fail

This term is used to describe a major and often embarrassing failure or mistake.

  • For example, if someone attempts a skateboard trick and falls, it could be considered an epic fail.
  • A person might say, “I tried to bake a cake from scratch, but it turned out terrible. Epic fail.”
  • Another might use it humorously, saying, “I tripped and spilled my coffee all over myself. Epic fail.”

29. Rookie Mistake

This phrase is used to describe a mistake made by someone who is inexperienced or new to a particular activity or situation.

  • For instance, if someone forgets to bring their passport to the airport, it could be considered a rookie mistake.
  • A person might say, “I accidentally deleted all my files without backing them up. Rookie mistake.”
  • Another might use it humorously, saying, “I wore mismatched socks to an important meeting. Total rookie mistake.”

30. Bummer

This word is used to express disappointment or regret about a situation or outcome.

  • For example, if someone’s plans get canceled last minute, they might say, “Bummer.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t get the job I interviewed for. Bummer.”
  • Another might use it to empathize with someone, saying, “You lost your wallet? That’s a bummer.”

31. That’s on me

This phrase is used to take responsibility for a mistake or failure. It acknowledges that the blame lies with the speaker.

  • For example, if someone drops and breaks a glass, they might say, “That’s on me, I should’ve been more careful.”
  • In a team project, if someone makes an error, they might say, “I apologize, that’s on me for not double-checking my work.”
  • A person who forgets to pick up a friend from the airport might admit, “I messed up, that’s on me for forgetting the time.”

32. I knew I should’ve

This phrase expresses regret for not following one’s instincts or intuition. It suggests that the speaker had a sense that a different decision or action would have been better.

  • For instance, if someone chooses the wrong route while driving, they might say, “I knew I should’ve taken the other road.”
  • In a situation where someone trusted the wrong person, they might say, “I had a feeling I should’ve been more cautious.”
  • A person who didn’t study enough for a test might say, “I knew I should’ve spent more time preparing.”

33. I messed up

This phrase acknowledges that the speaker made an error or did something wrong. It implies regret and often a desire to rectify the situation.

  • For example, if someone forgets an important appointment, they might say, “I messed up, I completely forgot about it.”
  • In a relationship, if someone says something hurtful, they might admit, “I messed up, I shouldn’t have said that.”
  • A person who accidentally breaks a valuable item might say, “I messed up, I should’ve been more careful.”

34. Ugh

This word is often used as an exclamation to convey annoyance, disappointment, or regret. It is a simple expression of negative emotions.

  • For instance, if someone spills coffee on their shirt, they might say, “Ugh, now I have to change.”
  • In a situation where plans fall through, someone might say, “Ugh, I was really looking forward to that.”
  • A person who realizes they made an error might say, “Ugh, I can’t believe I did that.”

35. Blunder

This word refers to a significant error or mistake, often resulting from carelessness or lack of judgment. It implies a sense of regret or embarrassment.

  • For example, if someone accidentally sends an email to the wrong recipient, they might say, “I made a blunder by not double-checking the address.”
  • In a sports game, if a player makes a costly mistake, they might be described as having made a blunder.
  • A person who makes a social faux pas might acknowledge, “That was a blunder on my part, I didn’t realize it would be offensive.”

36. Screwed the pooch

This phrase is a humorous way of saying that someone has made a major error or blunder. It is often used to express regret or frustration over a mistake.

  • For example, “I really screwed the pooch on that project. I made so many mistakes.”
  • In a conversation about failed relationships, someone might say, “He really screwed the pooch by cheating on her.”
  • Another person might use the phrase to describe a personal mistake, saying, “I screwed the pooch by forgetting my friend’s birthday.”

37. Dang it

This phrase is a milder way of expressing regret or annoyance. It is often used when someone realizes they have made a mistake or something has not gone as planned.

  • For instance, “Dang it, I forgot to buy milk at the grocery store.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “Dang it, I should have applied for that job.”
  • Another person might use the phrase to express regret over a decision, saying, “Dang it, I shouldn’t have eaten that whole pizza.”

38. Wishing I could turn back time

This phrase expresses a strong desire to go back in time and undo a mistake or decision. It is often used when someone is feeling regretful or nostalgic.

  • For example, “I’m really wishing I could turn back time and apologize to her.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “I wish I could turn back time and take that job offer.”
  • Another person might use the phrase to express regret over a past action, saying, “I’m constantly wishing I could turn back time and not cheat on my partner.”

39. It’s all my fault

This phrase is a straightforward way of accepting blame for a mistake or failure. It is often used when someone feels remorseful and wants to acknowledge their role in a negative outcome.

  • For instance, “I messed up the presentation. It’s all my fault.”
  • In a conversation about a broken friendship, someone might say, “I said some hurtful things. It’s all my fault.”
  • Another person might use the phrase to express regret over a missed opportunity, saying, “I didn’t take the chance. It’s all my fault.”

40. I should’ve known better

This phrase expresses regret for not making a smarter or more informed decision. It is often used when someone realizes they have made a mistake and acknowledges that they should have made a different choice.

  • For example, “I should’ve known better than to trust him. He always lets me down.”
  • In a conversation about a failed investment, someone might say, “I should’ve known better than to put all my money into that risky venture.”
  • Another person might use the phrase to express regret over a past action, saying, “I should’ve known better than to cheat on my diet.”

41. I’ll never live this down

This phrase is used to express the feeling that a mistake or embarrassing moment will always be remembered or held against the person.

  • For example, “I spilled coffee on my boss during the meeting, and I’ll never live this down.”
  • In a conversation about embarrassing moments, someone might say, “I tripped in front of everyone at the party, and I’ll never live that down.”
  • A person might lament, “I made a huge mistake at work, and I’ll never live this down.”

42. I regret to inform you

This phrase is commonly used to introduce bad or unpleasant news to someone.

  • For instance, “I regret to inform you that your application has been denied.”
  • In a formal email, someone might write, “I regret to inform you that the event has been canceled due to unforeseen circumstances.”
  • A doctor might say, “I regret to inform you that the test results came back positive.”

43. I’m kicking myself

This expression is used to convey a feeling of regret or disappointment in oneself for making a mistake or missing an opportunity.

  • For example, “I missed out on buying Bitcoin when it was cheap, and I’m kicking myself now.”
  • In a conversation about regrets, someone might say, “I broke up with my ex, and now I’m kicking myself for letting them go.”
  • A person might admit, “I had the chance to travel the world, but I didn’t take it, and I’m kicking myself for that.”

44. Heartbroken

This term is used to describe intense feelings of sadness, disappointment, or regret, often associated with the end of a relationship or a significant loss.

  • For instance, “I found out my partner cheated on me, and I’m heartbroken.”
  • In a discussion about personal experiences, someone might share, “I lost my job unexpectedly, and I’ve been feeling heartbroken ever since.”
  • A person might say, “I had to give up my dream of becoming a professional athlete, and it left me heartbroken.”

45. Screwed up

This phrase is used to acknowledge that one has made a mistake or messed something up.

  • For example, “I completely screwed up the presentation and forgot my lines.”
  • In a conversation about past blunders, someone might admit, “I screwed up my relationship by not communicating properly.”
  • A person might say, “I screwed up my chances of getting into my dream college by not studying enough.”

46. Should’ve seen that coming

This phrase is used to express regret for not predicting or foreseeing a particular outcome or consequence.

  • For example, if someone fails to prepare for an upcoming test and then performs poorly, they might say, “Should’ve seen that coming.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might reflect, “Looking back, I should’ve seen that coming.”
  • A person who didn’t anticipate the negative effects of a decision might say, “I should’ve seen that coming, but I was too focused on the potential benefits.”

47. Regretful mess

This term is used to describe a situation or person that is chaotic, disorganized, or causing regret or disappointment.

  • For instance, if someone throws a party and it becomes a complete disaster, they might say, “It turned into a regretful mess.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might comment, “The whole thing was a regretful mess from the start.”
  • A person who is disappointed with their own actions might say, “I made a regretful mess of things and now I have to deal with the consequences.”

48. My heart sank

This phrase is used to describe a sudden feeling of sadness, disappointment, or regret.

  • For example, if someone receives bad news, they might say, “My heart sank when I heard.”
  • In a discussion about a missed opportunity, someone might comment, “When they announced the winner, my heart sank.”
  • A person who realizes they made a mistake might say, “As soon as I hit send, my heart sank and I knew I had messed up.”

49. I’ll never forgive myself

This phrase is used to express a deep sense of regret and self-blame for a past action or decision.

  • For instance, if someone causes harm to a loved one, they might say, “I’ll never forgive myself for what I did.”
  • In a discussion about a missed opportunity, someone might reflect, “I’ll never forgive myself for not taking that chance.”
  • A person who realizes the consequences of their actions might say, “I’ll never forgive myself for the pain I caused.”

50. Regretful soul

This term is used to describe someone who is consumed by feelings of regret, sorrow, or disappointment.

  • For example, if someone constantly dwells on past mistakes, they might be referred to as a “regretful soul.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might comment, “I used to be a regretful soul, but I’ve learned to let go of the past.”
  • A person who is reflecting on their life choices might say, “I’ve become a regretful soul, always wondering what could have been.”

51. Regrettable mistake

Refers to a mistake or decision that one feels remorse or sorrow for. It implies that the mistake could have been avoided or was a result of poor judgment.

  • For example, “Breaking up with my ex was a regrettable mistake. I didn’t realize how much I loved them.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “Taking that job was a regrettable mistake. It turned out to be a toxic work environment.”
  • Another person might reflect, “Investing all my savings in that business venture was a regrettable mistake. I lost everything.”

52. Regretting the past

Refers to the act of looking back on one’s past choices or actions and feeling a sense of regret or sorrow for them.

  • For instance, “I spent years regretting the past and wishing I had made different choices.”
  • During a therapy session, someone might say, “I’m working on letting go of regretting the past and focusing on the present and future.”
  • A person might express, “Regretting the past is a natural part of personal growth, but it’s important not to dwell on it.”

53. Regretful outcome

Refers to a result or consequence of an action or decision that one feels remorse or sorrow for. It implies that the outcome could have been different or better.

  • For example, “The regretful outcome of the argument was the end of our friendship.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “The regretful outcome was the loss of a significant investment.”
  • Another person might reflect, “The regretful outcome of my actions was the damage it caused to my reputation.”

54. Regretful consequences

Refers to the negative effects or outcomes that result from an action or decision that one feels remorse or sorrow for. It implies that the consequences could have been avoided or were not anticipated.

  • For instance, “The regretful consequences of my reckless driving were a car accident and injuries.”
  • During a conversation about addiction, someone might say, “The regretful consequences of substance abuse include health problems and damaged relationships.”
  • A person might express, “It’s important to consider the potential regretful consequences before making impulsive decisions.”

55. Regretful realization

Refers to the moment of recognizing or understanding the regret or sorrow associated with a past action or decision. It implies a sudden awareness or realization of the negative emotions related to the situation.

  • For example, “It was a regretful realization that I had hurt someone I cared about with my words.”
  • In a therapy session, someone might say, “The regretful realization of the impact of my childhood trauma was a turning point in my healing.”
  • Another person might reflect, “The regretful realization that I had wasted years pursuing the wrong career motivated me to make a change.”

56. Regretful reflection

This term refers to the act of looking back on a past event or decision and feeling regret or wishing things had been done differently. It often involves recognizing mistakes or missed opportunities.

  • For example, someone might say, “In hindsight, I should have studied harder for that test.”
  • During a discussion about a failed business venture, a person might reflect, “In hindsight, we should have done more market research.”
  • A friend might offer advice, saying, “Learn from your mistakes and use hindsight to make better choices in the future.”
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