Top 34 Slang For Relatable – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing those moments that hit a little too close to home, having the right slang for relatable can make all the difference. Whether it’s a term that perfectly captures that feeling of “same” or a phrase that sums up a shared experience, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we break down the top slang terms that make everyday situations feel a little more connected and a lot more relatable. Get ready to nod your head in agreement and maybe even discover a new favorite phrase to use with your squad!

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1. Relatable AF

A phrase used to emphasize just how relatable something is. The addition of “AF” stands for “as f*ck” and adds emphasis to the relatability.

  • For example, “That meme is so relatable AF, it’s like they read my mind.”
  • A person might comment on a tweet saying, “This is me every Monday morning, relatable AF.”
  • Someone might share a post on Instagram with the caption, “When your crush finally texts you back, relatable AF.”

2. Same

A simple and concise way to express agreement or understanding with someone’s statement or situation.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I hate Mondays,” another person might respond with, “Same.”
  • In a group chat, someone might share a funny video and another person could reply, “Same, that’s totally me.”
  • A person might tweet, “I can’t wait for the weekend,” and receive replies saying, “Same here!” or “Same, I need a break.”

3. Mood

Used to convey that someone’s statement or situation perfectly captures a specific feeling or sentiment.

  • For example, if someone tweets, “I just want to stay in bed all day,” another user might reply with, “Mood.”
  • A person might post a picture of themselves looking tired with the caption, “Monday mood.”
  • In a conversation about stress, someone might say, “Meeting deadlines is such a mood.”

4. Big mood

Similar to “mood,” but with an added emphasis on the intensity or strength of the feeling or sentiment being expressed.

  • For instance, if someone shares a tweet saying, “I just want to eat pizza and watch Netflix all day,” another person might reply with, “Big mood.”
  • A person might comment on a funny meme saying, “This is such a big mood, I can’t stop laughing.”
  • In a discussion about procrastination, someone might say, “Putting things off until the last minute is a big mood for me.”

5. Real talk

Used to indicate that what follows is a sincere and unfiltered statement or opinion.

  • For example, if someone starts a comment with “Real talk,” they are signaling that they are about to share their genuine thoughts or experiences.
  • A person might tweet, “Real talk, self-care is important. Don’t neglect yourself.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Real talk, communication is key for a healthy partnership.”

6. Facts

When something is described as “facts,” it means that it is undeniably true or accurate. This slang term is often used to emphasize agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone says, “That movie was amazing, facts,” they are expressing their strong belief that the movie was indeed amazing.
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “The evidence supports my argument, facts.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “This is so relatable, facts!”

7. Big facts

Similar to “facts,” “big facts” emphasizes the truth or accuracy of a statement. However, the term “big facts” implies that the truth being stated is particularly significant or impactful.

  • For instance, if someone exclaims, “Big facts!” after hearing a powerful quote, they are expressing their agreement with the profound truth of the statement.
  • In a discussion about a popular trend, someone might say, “The impact of this trend is undeniable, big facts.”
  • A person might respond to a relatable meme by commenting, “This hits hard, big facts!”

8. On point

When something is described as “on point,” it means that it is precise, accurate, or relevant to the topic at hand. This slang term is often used to express agreement or approval.

  • For example, if someone says, “Your analysis of the situation is on point,” they are complimenting the accuracy and relevance of the analysis.
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Her outfit is on point,” indicating that the outfit is stylish and well put together.
  • A person might comment on a well-timed joke by saying, “Your sense of humor is always on point!”

9. That’s a vibe

When something is described as “a vibe,” it means that it evokes a particular feeling or mood. This slang term is often used to express resonance or relatability.

  • For instance, if someone says, “That song is such a vibe,” they are expressing that the song creates a specific atmosphere or emotional response.
  • In a discussion about a relaxing vacation spot, someone might say, “The beach is always a vibe,” indicating that it creates a calming and enjoyable atmosphere.
  • A person might comment on a cozy living room by saying, “This room gives off such a warm vibe!”

10. I felt that

When someone says “I felt that,” they are expressing that they can relate to or empathize with a statement or experience. This slang term is often used to show understanding or solidarity.

  • For example, if someone shares a personal story and another person responds with “I felt that,” they are indicating that they have had a similar experience or can understand the emotions involved.
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “I felt that,” to express empathy and understanding.
  • A person might comment on a relatable meme by saying, “This is so true, I felt that!”

11. It be like that sometimes

This phrase is used to express acceptance or resignation to a situation that is relatable or common. It acknowledges that life can be unpredictable or frustrating, but that’s just the way things are sometimes.

  • For example, if someone complains about a long wait time, a person might respond, “Yeah, it be like that sometimes.”
  • In a conversation about dealing with difficult people, someone might say, “You can’t please everyone, it be like that sometimes.”
  • A person might use this phrase to empathize with a friend’s breakup by saying, “Breakups are tough, it be like that sometimes.”

12. Can relate

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker understands and empathizes with what someone else is going through or experiencing. It’s a way of expressing solidarity and shared experiences.

  • For instance, if someone talks about their struggles with anxiety, a person might respond, “I can relate, I’ve been through something similar.”
  • In a conversation about dealing with difficult coworkers, someone might say, “I can totally relate, I have a coworker who drives me crazy too.”
  • A person might use this phrase to show understanding when a friend talks about feeling overwhelmed, by saying, “I can relate, life can be really overwhelming sometimes.”

13. Big same

This phrase is used to express agreement or solidarity with someone else’s statement or opinion. It’s a way of saying “I feel the same way” or “I have the same experience.”

  • For example, if someone says they hate Mondays, a person might respond, “Big same, Mondays are the worst.”
  • In a conversation about a favorite TV show, someone might say, “I love that show too, big same.”
  • A person might use this phrase to show agreement with a friend’s political opinion by saying, “Big same, I think the same way about that issue.”

14. Preach

This word is used to show strong agreement or support for someone’s statement or opinion. It’s a way of saying “I agree” or “You’re speaking the truth.”

  • For instance, if someone says, “Self-care is important,” a person might respond, “Preach, I couldn’t agree more.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of education, someone might say, “Preach, education is the key to success.”
  • A person might use this word to show support for a friend’s message of body positivity by saying, “Preach, everyone should love and accept themselves.”

15. Deadass

This word is used to emphasize that something is being said seriously or honestly. It’s a way of expressing sincerity or truthfulness.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re joking, you might respond, “No, deadass, I’m being serious.”
  • In a conversation about a shocking news story, someone might say, “Deadass, I can’t believe that happened.”
  • A person might use this word to emphasize their honesty when making a promise by saying, “I deadass won’t let you down, I’ll be there for you.”

16. Fr

A shortened version of “for real,” used to express agreement or emphasis. It is often used to confirm that something is relatable or true.

  • For example, if someone says, “That movie was so good,” another person might respond, “Fr, it was amazing!”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating situation, someone might say, “Fr, I can’t believe that happened.”
  • When discussing a relatable experience, a person might say, “Fr, I’ve been there before.”

17. Lowkey

Used to describe something that is done or felt in a subtle or private manner. It is often used to express a hidden or less intense opinion or feeling.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I lowkey love that song,” it means they secretly enjoy it.
  • In a discussion about a guilty pleasure, someone might admit, “Lowkey, I enjoy watching reality TV.”
  • When talking about a crush, a person might say, “Lowkey, I think they’re cute.”

18. Highkey

Used to describe something that is done or felt in a blatant or obvious manner. It is often used to express a strong or intense opinion or feeling.

  • For example, if someone says, “I highkey love pizza,” it means they openly and passionately enjoy it.
  • In a conversation about a favorite hobby, someone might say, “Highkey, I’m obsessed with photography.”
  • When discussing a strong preference, a person might say, “Highkey, I prefer dogs over cats.”

19. It really do be like that

A phrase used to acknowledge and accept the reality of a situation. It is often used to express understanding or agreement with something relatable.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I just spilled coffee all over myself,” another person might respond, “It really do be like that sometimes.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing outcome, someone might say, “It really do be like that, huh?”
  • When discussing a relatable struggle, a person might say, “It really do be like that when you’re running late.”

20. That hits different

A phrase used to describe something that elicits a strong emotional response or has a different impact compared to similar experiences. It is often used to express how something is relatable in a distinct way.

  • For example, if someone listens to a song that resonates with them on a deeper level, they might say, “Wow, that hits different.”
  • In a conversation about a specific food craving, someone might say, “Eating pizza at 2 am hits different.”
  • When discussing a nostalgic memory, a person might say, “Seeing my childhood home again hits different.”

21. Word

Used to acknowledge or agree with something that is relatable or accurate. It signifies that the speaker understands and agrees with what has been said.

  • For example, if someone says, “I hate Mondays,” another person might respond with, “Word.”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating situation, someone might say, “Word, that always happens to me too.”
  • When someone shares a relatable meme, others might comment with “Word” to show their agreement.
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22. Bet

An expression used to confirm or accept a statement or proposal. It signifies that the speaker is in agreement and willing to go along with the plan.

  • For instance, if someone suggests grabbing dinner later, another person might respond with, “Bet.”
  • In a conversation about attending a party, someone might say, “I’ll pick you up at 8.” The other person could reply, “Bet, see you then.”
  • When making plans with a friend, one might say, “Let’s meet at the park.” The friend could respond with, “Bet, sounds good.”

23. Big bet

A stronger version of “bet” that indicates complete agreement or certainty. It signifies that the speaker is fully on board and confident in the statement or plan.

  • For example, if someone suggests going on a road trip, another person might respond with, “Big bet.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new restaurant, someone might say, “I heard it’s amazing.” The other person could reply, “Big bet, let’s go.”
  • When discussing a challenging task, one might say, “I think we can do it.” The other person could respond with, “Big bet, we got this.”

24. I’m with you

Used to show empathy or agreement with someone’s statement or experience. It signifies that the speaker can relate to what has been said and supports the other person.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’m so tired,” another person might respond with, “I’m with you.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I feel so overwhelmed.” The other person could reply, “I’m with you, it’s tough.”
  • When discussing a shared interest or hobby, one might say, “I love playing video games.” The other person could respond with, “I’m with you, gaming is my passion too.”

25. That’s so me

Used to express that something resonates strongly with the speaker’s own experiences or personality. It signifies that the speaker feels a deep connection to what has been said.

  • For example, if someone describes a clumsy moment, another person might respond with, “That’s so me.”
  • In a conversation about being forgetful, someone might say, “I always lose my keys.” The other person could reply, “That’s so me, I can never keep track of mine.”
  • When discussing a particular habit or behavior, one might say, “I always procrastinate.” The other person could respond with, “That’s so me, I can never get things done on time.”

26. I’m vibing with that

When someone says “I’m vibing with that,” they mean that they agree with or relate to something that has been said or done. It expresses a positive connection or resonance with a particular statement or situation.

  • For example, if someone suggests going out for pizza and another person responds, “I’m vibing with that,” it means they are on board with the idea.
  • When someone shares a funny meme and someone else comments, “I’m vibing with that,” it means they find the meme relatable and it resonates with them.
  • If someone talks about their love for a specific music genre and another person says, “I’m vibing with that,” it means they share the same interest and enjoy that genre as well.
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27. Can’t relate

When someone says “Can’t relate,” they are expressing that they don’t understand or can’t relate to a particular experience, situation, or statement. It is often used humorously or sarcastically to indicate a lack of connection or understanding.

  • For instance, if someone is complaining about how difficult it is to wake up early in the morning, and another person responds with “Can’t relate,” it means they don’t share the same struggle because they are a morning person.
  • When someone talks about their favorite TV show and another person says, “Can’t relate,” it means they haven’t watched or don’t enjoy that particular show.
  • If someone is sharing a story about a wild night out and another person comments, “Can’t relate,” it means they haven’t had a similar experience or don’t enjoy that kind of socializing.

28. Me too

“Me too” is a simple and concise way to express agreement or shared experiences with someone. It indicates that the person saying it has the same feelings, thoughts, or has gone through a similar situation.

  • For example, if someone says, “I love chocolate,” and another person responds with “Me too,” it means they also have a love for chocolate.
  • When someone shares a frustrating experience at work and another person comments, “Me too,” it means they have encountered a similar situation.
  • If someone expresses excitement about a upcoming concert and another person says, “Me too,” it means they are also looking forward to the same event.

29. It me

When someone says “It me,” they are indicating that they strongly relate to something that has been said or shown. It is a way to express that a particular statement or situation accurately represents their own thoughts, feelings, or experiences.

  • For instance, if someone shares a funny meme about being socially awkward and another person comments, “It me,” it means they see themselves reflected in the meme.
  • When someone talks about their love for a specific TV show and another person says, “It me,” it means they also share that same enthusiasm for the show.
  • If someone describes their introverted nature and another person comments, “It me,” it means they can relate to being introverted as well.
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30. I’m dead

When someone says “I’m dead,” it can have different meanings depending on the context. It is often used to express extreme laughter, shock, or being overwhelmed by a situation or statement.

  • For example, if someone tells a hilarious joke and another person responds with “I’m dead,” it means they are laughing uncontrollably.
  • When someone shares surprising news and another person comments, “I’m dead,” it means they are shocked or surprised.
  • If someone describes a highly relatable or cringeworthy situation and another person says, “I’m dead,” it means they can’t handle how relatable or cringeworthy it is.

31. Mood af

This phrase is used to express a strong sense of relatability to a situation or feeling. “Mood af” stands for “mood as f***” and is often used in social media captions or conversations.

  • For example, if someone posts a funny meme about being tired, a user might comment, “Mood af, I can totally relate.”
  • When a friend cancels plans last minute, you might text them, “Mood af, I was looking forward to that.”
  • If someone shares a relatable tweet about procrastination, you might retweet it with the caption, “Mood af, this is me every day.”

32. Too real

This phrase is used to convey a strong sense of relatability or accuracy to a situation or statement. It emphasizes the authenticity or truthfulness of something.

  • For instance, if someone shares a tweet about the struggles of adulting, a user might reply, “Too real, I feel this on a spiritual level.”
  • When a friend tells a story about an embarrassing moment, you might respond, “Too real, I’ve been there before.”
  • If a comedian makes a joke that hits close to home, you might laugh and say, “Too real, that’s so true.”

33. It be like that

This phrase is used to express acceptance or resignation towards a situation or circumstance. It implies that the way things are is beyond one’s control or understanding.

  • For example, if someone complains about a long and tiring workday, a user might comment, “It be like that sometimes, hang in there.”
  • When a friend shares a frustrating experience, you might say, “It be like that, life can be tough.”
  • If someone expresses their disappointment about a canceled event, you might reply, “It be like that, unfortunately.”

34. Relatable vibes

This phrase is used to describe a situation, person, or content that evokes a strong sense of relatability. It implies that something resonates deeply with one’s own experiences or emotions.

  • For instance, if someone shares a funny video about introverts, a user might comment, “Relatable vibes, I can totally relate.”
  • When a friend tells a story about a relatable encounter, you might say, “Relatable vibes, I’ve been in a similar situation.”
  • If a social media post captures the struggles of waking up early, you might share it with the caption, “Relatable vibes, this is me every morning.”