Top 60 Slang For Remind – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying on top of your tasks and appointments, a little reminder can go a long way. But, have you ever stopped to think about the slang terms people use when talking about reminders? Our team has compiled a list of the trendiest and most useful slang for remind that will not only keep you in the loop but also add a fun twist to your daily vocabulary. Get ready to level up your reminder game with our exciting listicle!

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1. Jog memory

To jog someone’s memory means to help them remember something that they have forgotten or overlooked. It is a way to prompt or stimulate their memory.

  • For example, “Can you jog my memory? I can’t remember where I put my keys.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “That photo really jogged my memory. I remember now!”
  • A person might ask, “Can you jog my memory about what happened at the meeting yesterday?”

2. Nudge

To nudge someone means to give them a gentle reminder or prompt about something they may have forgotten or overlooked. It is a way to subtly bring their attention back to a specific topic or task.

  • For instance, “I just wanted to nudge you about the deadline for the report.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “Let’s nudge John to finish his part of the assignment.”
  • A coworker might nudge another by saying, “Don’t forget to submit your expense report by the end of the day.”

3. Prod

To prod someone means to poke or push them figuratively in order to remind or motivate them to do something or remember something. It is a way to encourage action or recollection.

  • For example, “I need to prod myself to start studying for the exam.”
  • If someone is struggling to remember a name, they might say, “Can you prod my memory? I know I’ve met them before.”
  • A parent might prod their child by saying, “Don’t forget to clean your room before dinner.”

4. Tap on the shoulder

To tap someone on the shoulder is a metaphorical way to get their attention or remind them of something. It implies a gentle physical action that is used to redirect their focus.

  • For instance, “I just wanted to tap you on the shoulder and remind you about the meeting tomorrow.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might tap another on the shoulder and say, “Excuse me, I think you dropped your pen.”
  • A teacher might tap a student on the shoulder to signal that it’s their turn to answer a question.

5. Cue

To cue someone means to give them a signal or hint to remind them of something or prompt them to take action. It is a way to provide a subtle indication or reminder.

  • For example, “His comment cued me to remember an important detail.”
  • In a theater production, a stage manager might cue an actor by saying, “Your cue is coming up. Get ready to enter the stage.”
  • A friend might cue another by saying, “Remember to bring your umbrella. It’s going to rain later.”

6. Prompt

This term refers to a cue or stimulus that serves as a reminder for someone to do something or remember something. It can be a word, phrase, or action that triggers a person’s memory.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I will give you a prompt to start writing your essay.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s move on to the next topic. Prompt me if I forget.”
  • A parent might remind their child by saying, “I’ll give you a prompt to clean your room after dinner.”

7. Hint

A hint is a subtle or indirect suggestion or piece of information that helps someone remember or understand something. It provides a clue or indication of what someone should remember or do.

  • For instance, a friend might give you a hint about a movie by saying, “It’s a romantic comedy set in Paris.”
  • In a game, a player might ask for a hint to solve a difficult puzzle.
  • A teacher might give hints to students to help them solve a math problem.

8. Tickler

A tickler is a term used to describe a reminder or a prompt that helps someone remember to do something at a specific time or date. It is often used in a professional or organizational context.

  • For example, a secretary might set up a tickler system to remind their boss of important meetings or deadlines.
  • In a legal setting, a lawyer might use a tickler system to keep track of court dates and deadlines.
  • A project manager might use a tickler system to remind team members of upcoming tasks or milestones.

9. Jog one’s elbow

To jog one’s elbow means to give someone a gentle reminder or nudge to help them remember something. It is a metaphorical term that implies physically nudging someone’s elbow to get their attention.

  • For instance, a friend might jog your elbow and say, “Don’t forget to bring your umbrella. It’s going to rain.”
  • In a meeting, a colleague might jog your elbow and whisper, “Remember to mention the new project during the presentation.”
  • A parent might jog their child’s elbow and say, “Don’t forget to say ‘thank you’ to Grandma.”

10. Tickle one’s brain

To tickle one’s brain means to engage or stimulate someone’s mind to help them remember or think more creatively. It is a figurative term that suggests tickling the brain’s intellectual capacity.

  • For example, a teacher might introduce a thought-provoking question to tickle their students’ brains.
  • A puzzle enthusiast might solve challenging puzzles to tickle their brain and keep their mind sharp.
  • A writer might read thought-provoking books to tickle their brain and find inspiration for their writing.

11. Whisper in the ear

This phrase means to remind someone in a subtle or secretive manner, often by speaking softly or privately to them. It implies a gentle or confidential reminder.

  • For example, a friend might whisper in your ear, “Don’t forget to bring the cake to the party.”
  • In a meeting, someone might whisper in their colleague’s ear, “We need to mention the new project during the presentation.”
  • A teacher might whisper in a student’s ear, “Remember to turn in your homework by tomorrow.”

12. Pester

To pester someone means to annoy or bother them persistently, especially with frequent reminders about something.

  • For instance, a parent might pester their child, “Have you finished your homework yet? Don’t forget to study for the test.”
  • A coworker might pester their colleague, “Remember to submit the report before the deadline. We can’t afford any delays.”
  • A friend might playfully pester their friend, “Hey, don’t forget our movie night tonight. I don’t want you bailing on me!”

13. Jolt

To jolt someone means to give them a sudden or unexpected reminder, often with the intention of surprising or catching their attention.

  • For example, a coworker might jolt their colleague, “Hey, the meeting starts in 5 minutes. Hurry up!”
  • A partner might jolt their significant other, “Remember, today is our anniversary. I have a surprise planned.”
  • A teacher might jolt their students, “Pop quiz! Remember to study your notes.”

14. Buzz

To buzz someone means to remind them in an enthusiastic or lively manner, often to create excitement or anticipation.

  • For instance, a friend might buzz their friend, “Guess what? The concert is tomorrow! Don’t forget to bring your ticket.”
  • A coworker might buzz their colleague, “Just a friendly reminder that the company party is tonight. It’s going to be epic!”
  • A parent might buzz their child, “Don’t forget, we’re going to the amusement park this weekend. Get ready for some fun!”

15. Clue in

To clue someone in means to inform or remind them about something, often by providing them with important information or details.

  • For example, a teacher might clue in their students, “Remember, the exam will cover chapters 1 to 5. Focus on those topics.”
  • A friend might clue in their friend, “Just a heads up, the restaurant we’re going to doesn’t accept credit cards. Bring cash.”
  • A coworker might clue in their colleague, “The boss wants us to finish the project by Friday. Let’s make sure we meet the deadline.”

16. Signal

To signal someone is to remind them of something or bring it to their attention.

  • For example, “Can you signal me to pick up milk on your way home?”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I just wanted to signal everyone that the deadline for the project is next week.”
  • A teacher might signal their students by saying, “Don’t forget to study for the test tomorrow.”

17. Cognizant

Being cognizant means being aware or conscious of something, often used to remind someone of a particular fact or situation.

  • For instance, “Just to make sure you’re cognizant, the meeting has been moved to tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I want to make you cognizant of the potential risks involved before making a decision.”
  • A parent might remind their child by saying, “Be cognizant of your surroundings and stay safe.”

18. Keep in the loop

To keep someone in the loop means to keep them updated or informed about a particular situation or event.

  • For example, “Make sure to keep me in the loop about any changes to the schedule.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “I’ll keep you in the loop regarding any updates on the project.”
  • A friend might remind another friend by saying, “Don’t forget to keep me in the loop about your vacation plans.”

19. Ring a bell

When something rings a bell, it means it triggers a memory or reminds someone of something.

  • For instance, “The name sounds familiar, but it doesn’t ring a bell.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “That song really rings a bell, it reminds me of my childhood.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Does this historical event ring a bell? We discussed it last week.”

20. Tug at the memory

When something tugs at the memory, it means it brings back a memory or reminds someone of something.

  • For example, “The smell of freshly baked cookies tugs at my memory of my grandmother’s house.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “That movie scene really tugs at my memory, it reminds me of a similar experience.”
  • A person might remind another person by saying, “Let me tell you a story that will tug at your memory.”

21. Whistle in the wind

This phrase refers to something that is easily forgotten or ignored. It implies that the reminder is not having any effect or impact on the person.

  • For example, “I told him to clean his room, but it was like whistling in the wind.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’ve been reminding my students about the upcoming test, but it feels like I’m whistling in the wind.”
  • A friend might joke, “I keep reminding her to return my book, but it’s like whistling in the wind.”

22. Echo in the mind

This phrase describes a reminder that continues to be present in one’s thoughts or memory. It suggests that the reminder is lingering and not easily forgotten.

  • For instance, “The image of her smile echoed in my mind long after she left.”
  • A person might say, “The sound of her laughter echoed in my mind for days.”
  • A writer might describe a haunting memory by saying, “The words he said echoed in my mind, haunting me.”

23. Rattle the brain

This phrase means to stimulate or shake up one’s memory. It implies that the reminder is causing the person to think or remember something.

  • For example, “That song always rattles my brain and brings back memories.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t remember where I left my keys, but maybe something will rattle my brain.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you rattle your brain and remember what we were supposed to do today?”

24. Buzz in the ear

This phrase refers to a persistent reminder or thought that keeps coming back to someone’s mind. It suggests that the reminder is like a buzzing sound that is hard to ignore.

  • For instance, “The idea of finishing the project kept buzzing in my ear all day.”
  • A person might say, “I have a buzzing reminder in my ear to call my mom.”
  • A coworker might joke, “That task you assigned me is like a buzzing reminder in my ear!”

25. Prod the memory

This phrase means to poke or stimulate one’s memory. It implies that the reminder is prompting the person to remember something.

  • For example, “The smell of freshly baked cookies always prods my memory of my grandma.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t recall his name, but maybe something will prod my memory.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you prod your memory and remember where we parked the car?”

26. Jog the brain

This phrase means to prompt or stimulate someone’s memory or thought process. It is often used to help someone remember something they may have forgotten.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s do a quick exercise to jog your brain and remember what we learned yesterday.”
  • In a conversation about solving a puzzle, someone might suggest, “Maybe jogging your brain will help you remember the answer.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t remember where I put my keys. Can you jog my brain and help me think?”

27. Poke the conscience

This phrase means to provoke or stimulate someone’s conscience, causing them to feel guilty or reflect on their moral choices or actions.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “I hope this situation pokes your conscience and makes you think about your behavior.”
  • In a discussion about ethical dilemmas, someone might argue, “Sometimes, we need to poke our own conscience and question our actions.”
  • A person might say, “The documentary really poked my conscience and made me reconsider my lifestyle choices.”

28. Tug at the heartstrings

This phrase means to evoke strong emotions, particularly sadness or sympathy. It is often used to describe something that deeply touches or affects someone emotionally.

  • For example, a movie reviewer might say, “This film will tug at your heartstrings and leave you in tears.”
  • In a discussion about charity campaigns, someone might say, “The goal is to create advertisements that tug at the heartstrings and encourage donations.”
  • A friend might say, “That story about the rescue dog really tugged at my heartstrings. I had to adopt him.”

29. Nudge the conscience

This phrase means to gently prompt or stimulate someone’s conscience, encouraging them to reflect on their moral choices or actions.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “The purpose of this assignment is to nudge your conscience and make you think about the consequences of your actions.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to create awareness campaigns that nudge people’s conscience and inspire them to take action.”
  • A person might say, “His words really nudged my conscience and made me reconsider my stance on the issue.”

30. Prod the recollection

This phrase means to stimulate or prompt someone’s recollection or memory. It is often used when trying to help someone remember something they may have forgotten.

  • For example, a therapist might say, “Let’s try some memory exercises to prod your recollection and help you recall important details.”
  • In a discussion about studying techniques, someone might suggest, “Using mnemonic devices can prod your recollection and make it easier to remember information.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t remember the name of that restaurant. Can you prod my recollection and help me remember?”

31. Cue in

To cue someone in means to give them a signal or indication to remember something. It can be used in various contexts to remind someone about a specific information or to bring attention to something important.

  • For example, “Cue me in if you remember where we parked the car.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Can you cue me in on the main points of the presentation?”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you cue in the class about the upcoming test?”

32. Hint at

To hint at something means to suggest or imply something in order to trigger a memory or remind someone of something. It is often used when someone wants to subtly remind another person about a particular topic or idea.

  • For instance, “She hinted at her favorite restaurant, hoping her friends would remember.”
  • During a conversation, someone might say, “I’m not sure what you’re referring to, but your words hint at something important.”
  • A writer might include subtle clues in a story to hint at a future plot twist.
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33. Tickle the brain

To tickle the brain means to stimulate or provoke thoughts in order to remember something. It is a playful way of describing the act of trying to jog someone’s memory or stimulate their thinking.

  • For example, “That puzzle really tickles the brain.”
  • When trying to recall a forgotten piece of information, someone might say, “I need something to tickle my brain and help me remember.”
  • A teacher might use interactive activities to tickle students’ brains and enhance their memory retention.

34. Nudge the memory

To nudge the memory means to gently remind or prompt someone to remember something. It implies a subtle and gentle reminder rather than directly telling someone what to remember.

  • For instance, “His old photograph nudged her memory of their childhood.”
  • When trying to recall a forgotten name, someone might say, “Can you give me a nudge? I’m trying to remember.”
  • A parent might nudge their child’s memory by saying, “Remember when we went to the beach last summer?”

35. Cognizant of

To be cognizant of something means to be aware or mindful of it. While it may not directly mean to remind someone, being cognizant of something can serve as a reminder to pay attention or be mindful of a particular subject.

  • For example, “She was cognizant of the fact that her presentation was due tomorrow.”
  • When discussing safety measures, someone might say, “Always be cognizant of your surroundings.”
  • A manager might remind their team, “Please be cognizant of the deadline for this project.”

36. Ping

To “ping” someone means to send them a message or notification to get their attention or remind them of something.

  • For example, “Can you ping me when you’re ready to leave?”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ll ping you with the meeting details later.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Can you ping everyone and remind them about the party tonight?”

37. Whistle

To “whistle” at someone means to give them a signal or reminder, similar to how a whistle can grab attention.

  • For instance, “I’ll whistle at you when it’s time to start the presentation.”
  • A friend might say, “Whistle if you need anything, and I’ll come help.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Whistle when you’re ready to switch players.”

38. Tickle

To “tickle” someone’s memory means to evoke a memory or feeling that reminds them of something.

  • For example, “That song really tickles my memory of our road trip.”
  • A friend might say, “This photo album always tickles my nostalgia.”
  • In a conversation about childhood, someone might say, “That smell really tickles my memories of my grandmother’s house.”

39. Tug

To “tug” someone means to pull their attention towards something or remind them of something.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a tug when it’s time to leave the party.”
  • A parent might say, “Tug on my sleeve if you need anything.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s give John a tug and bring him into the discussion.”

40. Nip

To “nip” someone means to give them a quick reminder or prompt.

  • For example, “I’ll nip you if you start drifting off during the lecture.”
  • A coworker might say, “Can you nip me when it’s time for our coffee break?”
  • In a study group, someone might say, “Nip me if I’m not paying attention during the review session.”

41. Whisper

To “whisper” is to subtly remind someone of something, often in a gentle or discreet manner. It implies reminding someone in a way that is not forceful or direct.

  • For example, if someone forgets to bring their umbrella and it starts to rain, you might say, “Just a whisper, don’t forget your umbrella next time.”
  • In a meeting, a coworker might whisper, “Don’t forget to mention the new project during your presentation.”
  • A friend might whisper, “We’re meeting at 7 pm, don’t be late!”

42. Alert

To “alert” someone is to give them a gentle nudge to remind them of something important. It implies drawing their attention to the matter without being too pushy.

  • For instance, if someone is engrossed in a conversation and you want to remind them of an appointment, you might say, “Just a quick alert, your doctor’s appointment is in 30 minutes.”
  • In a group chat, a friend might send an alert message saying, “Remember to submit your assignments by tomorrow.”
  • A parent might alert their child, “Don’t forget to pack your lunch for school!”

43. Flag

To “flag” something is to bring attention to it as a reminder. It implies marking or highlighting something important that needs to be remembered.

  • For example, if someone sends you an important email, you might flag it to remind yourself to respond later.
  • In a to-do list app, you can flag tasks that need to be completed urgently.
  • A teacher might flag a student’s assignment to remind themselves to provide feedback.
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44. Flash

To “flash” is to give a quick reminder or prompt. It implies reminding someone in a brief and concise manner.

  • For instance, if someone forgets their keys before leaving the house, you might say, “Just a quick flash, don’t forget your keys.”
  • In a team meeting, a colleague might say, “Just a flash reminder, the deadline for the project is tomorrow.”
  • A parent might flash a reminder to their child, “Don’t forget to brush your teeth before bed!”

45. Stir

To “stir” is to gently jog someone’s memory as a reminder. It implies prompting someone to remember something they may have forgotten.

  • For example, if someone forgets the name of a person they met before, you might say, “Let me stir your memory, his name is John.”
  • In a conversation about past events, someone might say, “That story stirs my memory of our trip to the beach.”
  • A friend might stir your memory by saying, “Remember the time we went hiking and got lost?”

46. Beckon

To beckon means to make a gesture with the hand, arm, or head to encourage someone to come closer or follow.

  • For instance, a teacher might beckon a student to come to the front of the class.
  • In a crowded room, someone might beckon their friend to join them by waving.
  • A parent might beckon their child to come inside by motioning with their finger.

47. Hark

Hark is an old-fashioned word that means to listen or pay attention.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Hark, students! I have an announcement.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Hark, I have an idea. Let’s go to the park.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Hark to what I’m saying. It’s important.”

48. Snap

Snap is a slang term that means to remember or recall something quickly.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What was the name of that movie?” and you remember, you can say, “Oh, snap! It’s called ‘The Matrix’.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “I snapped and remembered what happened that night.”
  • A friend might say, “Snap, I forgot to bring my wallet. Can you lend me some money?”

49. Clue

Clue is a term used to refer to a hint or a piece of information that helps to solve a problem or understand something.

  • For example, if someone is trying to guess a riddle, you might give them a clue to help them figure it out.
  • In a game of charades, someone might say, “I’ll give you a clue. It’s a movie title.”
  • A teacher might give their students a clue to help them solve a math problem.
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50. Whack

Whack is a slang term that means to hit or strike something or someone.

  • For instance, if someone throws a ball at you and you catch it, you might say, “I whacked that ball out of the park.”
  • In a fight scene in a movie, one character might whack another with a punch.
  • A parent might warn their child, “If you misbehave, I’ll whack you on the backside.”

51. Knock

To remind someone of something or bring something to their attention. The term “knock” implies giving a gentle nudge to someone’s memory.

  • For example, “Can you knock my memory? I can’t remember where I put my keys.”
  • A friend might say, “I need you to knock my memory about the meeting tomorrow.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you knock my memory about the movie we wanted to watch?”

52. Zap

To suddenly and vividly remind someone of something. The term “zap” suggests a sudden jolt or shock that brings a memory to the forefront.

  • For instance, “The smell of fresh-baked cookies zapped my memory of my grandma’s kitchen.”
  • A person might say, “That song zapped my memory of my high school prom.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “The sight of the ocean zapped my memory of our family vacation.”

53. Tickle memory

To gently stimulate or provoke someone’s memory. The term “tickle memory” suggests a light and playful reminder.

  • For example, “Seeing that old photograph tickled my memory of our childhood.”
  • A person might say, “The taste of this dish tickles my memory of my grandmother’s cooking.”
  • Someone might mention, “The sound of rain on the roof tickles my memory of cozy nights at home.”

54. Jolt memory

To cause a sudden and powerful recollection of something. The term “jolt memory” implies a strong and unexpected reminder.

  • For instance, “The sound of fireworks jolted my memory of the Fourth of July.”
  • A person might say, “That familiar face jolted my memory of our high school reunion.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “The sight of the old building jolted my memory of my childhood home.”

55. Whisper in ear

To remind someone privately or discreetly. The term “whisper in ear” suggests a subtle and personal way of reminding someone.

  • For example, “I’ll whisper in your ear to remind you about our secret plan.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll whisper in your ear to remind you of the surprise party.”
  • Someone might mention, “I’ll whisper in your ear to remind you of the password.”

56. Give a heads up

To give someone a warning or notification about something that is going to happen or needs their attention. It is a way to remind someone about a specific event or task.

  • For example, “Hey, just wanted to give you a heads up that the meeting has been moved to tomorrow.”
  • A coworker might say, “Can you give me a heads up before you leave for lunch?”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me a heads up when you’re about to leave the house?”

57. Send a memo

To send someone a formal or informal message to remind them about a task or event. It is a way to provide information or instructions to a group of people.

  • For instance, “I’ll send a memo to all employees reminding them about the new policy.”
  • A manager might say, “Make sure to send a memo to all team members about the upcoming deadline.”
  • A teacher might send a memo to students saying, “Just a friendly reminder about the upcoming test.”

58. Shoot a reminder

To send a reminder message to someone promptly. It implies sending a reminder in a quick and efficient manner.

  • For example, “I’ll shoot you a reminder about the meeting tomorrow morning.”
  • A friend might say, “Shoot me a reminder about the party tonight.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you shoot me a reminder about the report deadline?”

59. Fire off a reminder

To send a reminder message quickly and assertively. It conveys a sense of urgency and efficiency in reminding someone about a task or event.

  • For instance, “I’ll fire off a reminder email to the team about the project deadline.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll fire off a reminder to our clients about the upcoming event.”
  • A student might fire off a reminder to their classmates about an upcoming group project meeting.

60. Set off an alarm

To activate an alarm or signal to remind someone about a specific event or task. It can be used metaphorically to mean causing someone to pay attention or take action.

  • For example, “I’ll set off an alarm on your phone to remind you about the appointment.”
  • A parent might say, “I’ll set off an alarm in the morning to wake up the kids for school.”
  • A supervisor might set off an alarm to evacuate the building during a fire drill.