Top 24 Slang For Remorseful – Meaning & Usage

Feeling regretful or remorseful is a common human experience, but expressing it in a cool and trendy way can be a challenge. Join us as we uncover the top slang terms for feeling remorseful that are making waves in modern conversations. Whether you’re looking to up your language game or simply stay in the loop, this listicle is sure to have you covered with the latest expressions for expressing remorse.

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1. Penitent

Penitent is a word used to describe someone who feels remorse or regret for their actions. It implies a sense of deep sorrow and a desire for forgiveness.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am truly penitent for the pain I caused you.”
  • In a religious context, a penitent might seek absolution through confession and repentance.
  • Someone who is penitent might express their remorse by saying, “I will do whatever it takes to make it right.”

2. Apologetic

Apologetic is an adjective used to describe someone who feels sorry or remorseful for their actions. It implies a sincere expression of regret and a willingness to make amends.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I am deeply apologetic for my behavior last night.”
  • When apologizing, a person might say, “I want to make it right and show you how apologetic I am.”
  • A person might describe themselves as apologetic by saying, “I always try to be understanding and apologetic when I make a mistake.”

3. Repentant

Repentant is an adjective used to describe someone who feels remorseful for their actions and is willing to change their behavior. It implies a sincere desire for forgiveness and a commitment to making amends.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am truly repentant for the pain I have caused you.”
  • In a religious context, repentance often involves acknowledging one’s sins and seeking forgiveness from a higher power.
  • Someone who is repentant might express their remorse by saying, “I will do whatever it takes to make things right and earn your forgiveness.”

4. Rueful

Rueful is an adjective used to describe someone who feels regret or sorrow for their actions. It implies a sense of sadness or disappointment in oneself.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have a rueful feeling about how I treated you.”
  • When reflecting on past mistakes, a person might say, “I am filled with rueful thoughts about what I could have done differently.”
  • A person might describe themselves as rueful by saying, “I often look back on my actions with a rueful attitude, wishing I had done things differently.”

5. Shamefaced

Shamefaced is an adjective used to describe someone who feels deep shame or embarrassment for their actions. It implies a strong sense of regret and a desire to hide or avoid further scrutiny.

  • For example, someone might say, “I am shamefaced by my behavior and I am truly sorry.”
  • When expressing remorse, a person might say, “I feel so shamefaced for what I did, and I want to make it right.”
  • A person might describe themselves as shamefaced by saying, “I can’t look anyone in the eye right now because I feel so shamefaced.”

6. Remorseful

Feeling or expressing deep regret or guilt for one’s actions or words.

  • For example, “He was remorseful after realizing the impact of his words.”
  • A person might say, “I am truly remorseful for my behavior last night.”
  • In a confession, someone might admit, “I feel remorseful for the pain I caused.”

7. Apologies

Expressions of regret or remorse for one’s actions or words.

  • For instance, “He offered his apologies for the mistake.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you an apology for my behavior.”
  • In a formal setting, someone might write, “Please accept my sincere apologies for any inconvenience caused.”

8. Guilty

Feeling responsible for a wrongdoing or offense.

  • For example, “He felt guilty for betraying his friend’s trust.”
  • A person might admit, “I am guilty of neglecting my responsibilities.”
  • In a court of law, someone might be found “guilty” of a crime based on evidence and testimony.
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9. Compunctious

Feeling remorse or regret for one’s actions or words.

  • For instance, “She was compunctious after realizing the impact of her actions.”
  • A person might say, “I am feeling compunctious about what I said.”
  • In a sincere apology, someone might express, “I am genuinely compunctious for the pain I caused.”

10. Sorry not sorry

A sarcastic phrase used to express a lack of remorse or regret for one’s actions or words.

  • For example, “She made a controversial statement and added ‘sorry not sorry’.”
  • A person might say, “I said what I said, sorry not sorry.”
  • In a defiant tone, someone might declare, “I’m unapologetic for being true to myself.”

11. My bad

This phrase is used to admit fault or take responsibility for a mistake. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, if you accidentally spill a drink, you might say, “Oops, my bad!”
  • If you forget to return a friend’s book, you could apologize by saying, “Sorry, my bad. I’ll bring it back tomorrow.”
  • When someone points out an error in your work, you might respond with, “You’re right, that’s my bad. I’ll fix it.”

12. Guilty as charged

This phrase is used to confess or acknowledge one’s guilt or responsibility for something. It is often used humorously or ironically.

  • For instance, if someone accuses you of eating the last slice of pizza, you might respond with a smile and say, “Guilty as charged!”
  • If you make a mistake at work and your coworker catches it, you could playfully say, “Well, I guess I’m guilty as charged.”
  • When someone confronts you about breaking a rule, you might jokingly say, “You got me, I’m guilty as charged.”

13. Chagrined

This word describes a feeling of embarrassment or unease due to a mistake or failure. It implies a sense of remorse or regret.

  • For example, if you accidentally trip and fall in public, you might feel chagrined by the incident.
  • If you make an error during a presentation, you could feel chagrined about the mistake.
  • When someone points out a flaw in your work, you might respond with a chagrined expression and say, “I can’t believe I missed that.”

14. Reproachful

This word describes a look or tone that conveys disapproval or disappointment. It implies that someone is expressing their remorse or dissatisfaction with your actions.

  • For instance, if you forget to do a task you were assigned, your boss might give you a reproachful look.
  • If you break a promise to a friend, they might speak to you in a reproachful tone.
  • When someone is disappointed in your choices, they might say, “I’m not angry, just reproachful.”

15. Atone

This word means to make up for a mistake or wrongdoing by taking action to correct it or show remorse. It implies a desire to make things right.

  • For example, if you accidentally damage someone’s property, you might offer to atone for it by paying for the repairs.
  • If you hurt someone’s feelings, you could atone by apologizing and making an effort to be more considerate.
  • When someone acknowledges their past mistakes and works to improve, they are actively atoning for their actions.
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16. Apologizing

This term refers to the act of expressing regret or remorse for one’s actions or words. It is often used when someone acknowledges their wrongdoing and seeks forgiveness.

  • For example, “He is constantly apologizing for his mistakes.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I think apologizing is an important part of resolving conflicts.”
  • A person might comment, “I hate when people make half-hearted apologies instead of genuinely apologizing.”

17. At fault

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is to blame or responsible for a negative outcome or situation. It implies that the person has made a mistake or error.

  • For instance, “She admitted that she was at fault for the project’s failure.”
  • In a discussion about a car accident, someone might say, “Determining who was at fault can be a complex process.”
  • A person might comment, “It takes maturity to accept when you are at fault and learn from it.”

18. Blameful

This term describes someone who deserves blame or is responsible for a wrongdoing. It suggests that the person’s actions or decisions have caused harm or negative consequences.

  • For example, “The CEO was seen as blameful for the company’s financial crisis.”
  • In a conversation about a failed project, someone might say, “The blameful party should take responsibility and make amends.”
  • A person might comment, “Blaming others instead of accepting one’s own blameful actions is not productive.”

19. Penitential

This word describes a feeling of deep remorse or regret for one’s actions or decisions. It implies a sense of sorrow and a desire to make amends or seek forgiveness.

  • For instance, “He wrote a penitential letter to apologize for his behavior.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Reflecting on past mistakes can lead to a penitential mindset.”
  • A person might comment, “A penitential attitude is essential for repairing damaged relationships.”

20. Apologetically

This term describes an action or statement made with regret or remorse. It suggests that the person is acknowledging their mistake or wrongdoing and is expressing their remorse.

  • For example, “She apologized apologetically for her thoughtless comment.”
  • In a conversation about a missed deadline, someone might say, “He explained apologetically that unforeseen circumstances caused the delay.”
  • A person might comment, “Apologizing apologetically shows genuine remorse and a willingness to make amends.”

21. Regretting

When someone is regretting something, they are expressing their sorrow or remorse for a particular action or decision.

  • For example, “I’m regretting not studying for that exam.”
  • A person might say, “I’m regretting eating that entire pizza by myself.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, someone might say, “I’m regretting not taking that job offer.”

22. Contritely

When someone behaves contritely, they are showing sincere remorse or penitence for their actions.

  • For instance, “He apologized contritely for his mistake.”
  • A person might say, “She looked at him contritely, realizing her words had hurt him.”
  • In a discussion about forgiveness, someone might say, “If he apologizes contritely, I’m willing to give him a second chance.”

23. Repentantly

When someone acts repentantly, they are demonstrating deep regret or remorse for their behavior or choices.

  • For example, “He spoke repentantly, admitting his wrongdoings.”
  • A person might say, “She looked at her friend repentantly, realizing the impact of her actions.”
  • In a conversation about making amends, someone might say, “I’m willing to forgive if they show they truly repentantly.”

24. Ashamedly

When someone does something ashamedly, they are expressing their feelings of shame or guilt for a particular action or decision.

  • For instance, “He admitted his mistake ashamedly.”
  • A person might say, “She looked down at the ground ashamedly, unable to meet their eyes.”
  • In a discussion about moral dilemmas, someone might say, “I made the wrong choice and I’m ashamedly of it.”