Top 61 Slang For Removal – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to decluttering your vocabulary, there’s a whole new world of slang for removal waiting to be explored. From phrases that are slowly fading out of use to trendy terms that are taking over, we’ve got you covered. Let’s dive into this list and freshen up your language game with the latest and greatest in slang for removal.

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1. Axed

To be “axed” means to be fired or dismissed from a job or position. This term is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “John got axed from his job after the company downsized.”
  • In a discussion about layoffs, someone might say, “I hope I don’t get axed in the next round.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you hear that Sarah got axed from her internship?”

2. Bounced

To be “bounced” means to be forcefully or abruptly removed from a place or situation. This term is often used when referring to being kicked out or evicted.

  • For instance, “They bounced him from the club after he started a fight.”
  • In a conversation about unruly party guests, someone might say, “We had to bounce those guys from the party.”
  • A person might share a story, saying, “I got bounced from the bar for accidentally breaking a glass.”

3. Canned

To be “canned” means to be fired or let go from a job. This term is often used in a more formal or professional context.

  • For example, “She was canned from her position due to poor performance.”
  • In a discussion about layoffs, someone might say, “Many employees were canned as part of the company’s restructuring.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Did you hear that Bill got canned? I wonder what happened.”

4. Cut

To be “cut” means to be removed or excluded from a group or activity. This term is often used in a social or interpersonal context.

  • For instance, “I got cut from the basketball team because I didn’t make the tryouts.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might say, “She cut me out of her life after we had an argument.”
  • A person might share a story, saying, “I got cut from the project team because they said I wasn’t contributing enough.”

5. Ditched

To be “ditched” means to be abandoned or left behind by someone. This term is often used when referring to a sudden or unexpected departure.

  • For example, “He ditched me at the party and left without saying goodbye.”
  • In a discussion about unreliable friends, someone might say, “I always get ditched by my friends when they make other plans.”
  • A person might share a story, saying, “I got ditched by my date halfway through the movie.”

6. Evicted

To be forced to leave a place, especially a rental property, due to non-payment of rent or violation of the lease agreement.

  • For example, “The landlord evicted the tenant for constantly throwing parties and disturbing the neighbors.”
  • A news article might report, “Hundreds of families were evicted from their homes due to a sudden increase in rent.”
  • In a personal story, someone might say, “I was evicted from my apartment and had to find a new place to live.”

7. Expelled

To be officially removed or banned from a school, organization, or group due to misconduct or violation of rules.

  • For instance, “The student was expelled from school for cheating on exams.”
  • A headline might read, “The politician was expelled from the party for his controversial statements.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I got expelled from my sports team for breaking the code of conduct.”

8. Kicked to the curb

To be abruptly rejected, dismissed, or abandoned by someone.

  • For example, “After years of dating, she kicked him to the curb and started seeing someone else.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t believe he kicked you to the curb after all you’ve done for him.”
  • In a movie scene, a character might say, “I’m tired of being kicked to the curb. It’s time for me to stand up for myself.”

9. Ousted

To be forcefully removed or replaced from a position of authority or leadership.

  • For instance, “The CEO was ousted from the company due to financial mismanagement.”
  • A news report might state, “The dictator was ousted by a popular uprising.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “The corrupt politicians must be ousted from office for the country to progress.”

10. Purged

To eliminate or remove something completely, often with the intention of cleansing or purifying.

  • For example, “He purged his social media accounts of all toxic people.”
  • A health article might recommend, “Try a detox diet to purge your body of harmful toxins.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I need to purge my closet and get rid of all the clothes I never wear.”

11. Sacked

To be dismissed from a job or position, often due to poor performance or misconduct. “Sacked” is a British slang term that is commonly used to refer to being fired.

  • For example, “After multiple complaints from customers, the employee was sacked.”
  • In a discussion about workplace issues, someone might say, “I can’t believe they sacked him without any warning.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I got sacked from my job, but it turned out to be a blessing in disguise.”

12. Scrapped

To get rid of something or someone, often due to it being no longer useful or valuable. “Scrapped” is a slang term that can be used to describe the act of removing or disposing of something.

  • For instance, “The old car was scrapped after it broke down beyond repair.”
  • In a conversation about a failed project, someone might say, “We decided to scrap the entire plan and start from scratch.”
  • A person discussing decluttering might say, “I finally scrapped all the old clothes that I never wear anymore.”

13. Shown the door

To be dismissed or let go from a job or position. “Shown the door” is an idiomatic expression that implies being forcefully or unceremoniously removed.

  • For example, “After the scandal, the CEO was shown the door.”
  • In a discussion about office politics, someone might say, “If you don’t play by their rules, you’ll be shown the door.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I knew I was going to be shown the door, so I started looking for a new job.”

14. Silenced

To be silenced means to be forcefully or abruptly removed from a situation or position. It can imply being excluded or no longer having a voice or influence.

  • For instance, “The whistleblower was silenced by the company.”
  • In a conversation about censorship, someone might say, “They tried to silence anyone who spoke out against the government.”
  • A person discussing a controversial figure might say, “They were silenced by the public backlash and had to step down from their position.”

15. Terminated

To have one’s employment or contract abruptly ended, often due to poor performance or a violation of terms. “Terminated” is a formal term that is commonly used to describe being fired or let go from a job.

  • For example, “The employee was terminated for consistently missing deadlines.”
  • In a discussion about company policies, someone might say, “If you violate the code of conduct, you can be terminated.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was terminated from my job, but it motivated me to start my own business.”

16. Thrown out

This slang term refers to something being discarded or gotten rid of. It often implies that the item or person is no longer wanted or needed.

  • For example, “I threw out all my old clothes that didn’t fit anymore.”
  • In a conversation about a breakup, someone might say, “He got thrown out of the house after the argument.”
  • A person discussing a failed business venture might say, “We had to throw out the entire project and start over.”

17. Unseated

This slang term is used to describe someone being removed from a position of authority or power. It can refer to a political leader, a champion in a competition, or anyone who is no longer in a position of control or influence.

  • For instance, “The reigning champion was unseated by a newcomer in a surprising upset.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The corrupt official was unseated after a long investigation.”
  • A person discussing a change in leadership might say, “The CEO was unseated due to poor performance.”

18. Vanished

This slang term means to disappear suddenly and completely, leaving no trace behind. It can refer to a person, an object, or even a concept that seems to have disappeared or become inaccessible.

  • For example, “The magician made the rabbit vanish right before our eyes.”
  • In a discussion about a missing person, someone might say, “He vanished without a trace, leaving everyone puzzled.”
  • A person discussing a lost opportunity might say, “The job offer vanished when the company went bankrupt.”

19. Wiped out

This slang term means to completely eliminate or destroy something. It can refer to a physical object, a group of people, or even a concept that has been eradicated or rendered non-existent.

  • For instance, “The tornado wiped out the entire town, leaving nothing but rubble.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s defeat, someone might say, “They got wiped out by their opponents in a humiliating loss.”
  • A person discussing a financial disaster might say, “The stock market crash wiped out people’s life savings.”

20. X-ed out

This slang term means to mark something off a list or to eliminate it as an option. It can refer to a task, a person, or anything that is no longer considered or included.

  • For example, “I X-ed out all the items on my to-do list.”
  • In a discussion about potential candidates for a job, someone might say, “We X-ed out the ones who didn’t meet the qualifications.”
  • A person discussing a failed plan might say, “We had to X out that idea because it was too risky.”

21. Yanked

To “yank” something means to pull it with a sudden and forceful motion, often resulting in the removal of the object from its original position.

  • For example, “He yanked the cord out of the socket.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult extraction, someone might say, “We had to yank the car out of the mud.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I yanked the weed out of the ground, roots and all!”

22. Zapped

To “zap” something means to eliminate or remove it quickly and efficiently.

  • For instance, “She zapped the stain with a powerful cleaning solution.”
  • In a discussion about getting rid of pests, someone might say, “I zapped the fly with a fly swatter.”
  • A person might mention, “I zapped the old files from my computer to free up space.”

23. Chuck

To “chuck” something means to throw it away or discard it.

  • For example, “He chucked the broken toy in the trash.”
  • In a conversation about decluttering, someone might say, “I’m going to chuck these old clothes.”
  • A person might mention, “I chucked the empty bottle into the recycling bin.”

24. Ditch

To “ditch” something means to abandon or get rid of it, often in a hasty or careless manner.

  • For instance, “He ditched his old car and bought a new one.”
  • In a discussion about ending a relationship, someone might say, “She finally ditched her toxic boyfriend.”
  • A person might mention, “I ditched my old phone and upgraded to the latest model.”

25. Scrap

To “scrap” something means to dispose of or discard it, often because it is no longer useful or valuable.

  • For example, “They scrapped the old furniture and bought new ones.”
  • In a conversation about canceling a project, someone might say, “We decided to scrap the whole idea.”
  • A person might mention, “I scrapped the broken appliance and bought a new one.”

26. Bin

To dispose of something by putting it in a bin or trash can. “Bin” is a common slang term for the act of throwing something away or getting rid of it.

  • For example, “I need to bin these old magazines that are taking up space.”
  • A person cleaning out their closet might say, “I’m going to bin all these clothes I never wear.”
  • In a discussion about decluttering, someone might suggest, “Just bin anything that you haven’t used in the past year.”

27. Toss

To throw something away or get rid of it. “Toss” is a slang term often used to describe the act of throwing something in the trash or getting rid of it.

  • For instance, “I’m going to toss these old receipts that I no longer need.”
  • A person cleaning out their garage might say, “I need to toss all this junk that’s been piling up.”
  • In a conversation about organizing, someone might advise, “If you haven’t used it in a year, toss it.”

28. Purge

To eliminate or get rid of a large quantity of items or belongings. “Purge” is a slang term often used to describe the act of clearing out or decluttering.

  • For example, “I need to purge my closet and get rid of all the clothes I never wear.”
  • A person discussing their spring cleaning plans might say, “I’m going to purge all the unnecessary items in my house.”
  • In a discussion about minimalism, someone might suggest, “Start by purging all the items that don’t bring you joy.”

29. Trash

To dispose of something by putting it in the trash or garbage. “Trash” is a slang term often used to describe the act of throwing something away or getting rid of it.

  • For instance, “I need to trash these old papers that are cluttering my desk.”
  • A person cleaning out their pantry might say, “I’m going to trash all the expired food.”
  • In a conversation about tidying up, someone might advise, “Sort through your belongings and trash anything that is broken or no longer useful.”

30. Junk

To discard or dispose of something that is considered worthless or of low value. “Junk” is a slang term often used to describe something that is no longer wanted or needed.

  • For example, “I need to clean out my garage and get rid of all the junk.”
  • A person discussing their cluttered attic might say, “I have so much junk up there that I need to get rid of.”
  • In a discussion about downsizing, someone might suggest, “Start by getting rid of all the junk that is taking up space.”

31. Dump

To discard or dispose of something, often in a hasty or careless manner.

  • For example, “I need to dump these old clothes that don’t fit anymore.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to dump all the junk from my garage.”
  • In a breakup conversation, someone might say, “I think we should just dump each other and move on.”

32. Scrub

To remove or eliminate something completely.

  • For instance, “I need to scrub this stain out of my shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been scrubbing the old paint off the walls all day.”
  • In a computer context, someone might say, “I accidentally deleted the file, but luckily I was able to scrub it from the hard drive.”

33. Rid

To get rid of or remove something unwanted or undesirable.

  • For example, “I want to rid my house of pests.”
  • A person might say, “I need to rid myself of this bad habit.”
  • In a discussion about clutter, someone might say, “I’m trying to rid my life of unnecessary possessions.”

34. Clear out

To remove or get rid of the contents of a space or area.

  • For instance, “I need to clear out the clutter in my closet.”
  • A person might say, “I cleared out my old files to make room for new ones.”
  • In a moving situation, someone might say, “We need to clear out the furniture before the new tenants arrive.”

35. Cast off

To throw away or get rid of something.

  • For example, “It’s time to cast off these old clothes and buy new ones.”
  • A person might say, “I cast off all my old textbooks after graduation.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, someone might say, “I cast off my past and started fresh.”

36. Chuck out

This phrase is used to mean getting rid of something or disposing of it. It implies a casual or careless manner of removal.

  • For example, “I need to chuck out these old clothes that don’t fit anymore.”
  • When cleaning out a cluttered space, someone might say, “Let’s chuck out all the junk.”
  • In a conversation about decluttering, one person might ask, “What do you usually chuck out when you’re cleaning up?”

37. Abandon

This word is used to describe the act of leaving something or someone behind and not taking responsibility for it anymore.

  • For instance, “The owner decided to abandon the project halfway through.”
  • In a discussion about pets, someone might say, “It’s heartbreaking when people abandon their animals.”
  • A person talking about relationships might say, “He abandoned me when things got tough.”

38. Eliminate

This term means to completely remove or eradicate something, often with the intention of permanently erasing its presence.

  • For example, “We need to eliminate all the sources of pollution to improve air quality.”
  • In a conversation about dieting, someone might say, “I’m trying to eliminate processed foods from my meals.”
  • A person discussing pest control might say, “We need to eliminate the termite infestation before it causes more damage.”

39. Eradicate

This word is used to convey the complete and thorough removal of something, usually with the goal of eradicating it entirely.

  • For instance, “Efforts to eradicate the disease have been successful.”
  • In a discussion about invasive species, someone might say, “We need to eradicate the non-native plants to protect the local ecosystem.”
  • A person talking about a computer virus might say, “I had to reinstall the operating system to eradicate the malware.”

40. Exterminate

This term is often associated with the act of killing or destroying pests or unwanted organisms, with the intention of completely eradicating them.

  • For example, “The exterminator was called to exterminate the cockroach infestation.”
  • In a conversation about a bug problem, someone might say, “I need to call a professional to exterminate these ants.”
  • A person discussing a rodent issue might say, “We need to exterminate the mice before they cause more damage.”

41. Oust

To forcibly remove someone from a position of power or authority. “Oust” is often used in a political context to describe the removal of a leader or official from office.

  • For example, “The citizens demanded that the corrupt mayor be ousted from office.”
  • In a news headline, you might see, “CEO Ousted Amidst Scandal.”
  • A journalist might write, “The board voted to oust the chairman due to financial misconduct.”

42. Expel

To force someone to leave a place or group. “Expel” is a general term that can be used in various situations, such as school, organizations, or countries.

  • For instance, “The school decided to expel the student for repeated misconduct.”
  • In a discussion about international relations, one might say, “The country was expelled from the alliance for violating the terms.”
  • A member of a club might say, “If you break the rules, they can expel you without warning.”

43. Evict

To legally remove someone from a property or premises. “Evict” is commonly used in the context of landlords removing tenants who have violated their lease agreement or failed to pay rent.

  • For example, “The landlord filed a lawsuit to evict the non-paying tenant.”
  • In a news report, you might hear, “Several families were evicted from their homes due to a housing dispute.”
  • A real estate agent might say, “If the tenant refuses to leave, we will have to evict them through the proper legal channels.”

44. Banish

To exile or force someone to leave a place permanently. “Banish” is often used in a metaphorical sense to describe the act of isolating or ostracizing someone from a community or group.

  • For instance, “The dictator banished his political opponents to remote islands.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, one might say, “Being constantly ignored can feel like being banished from the group.”
  • A writer might describe a character as, “Banished from society, he lived as a hermit in the wilderness.”

45. Deport

To forcibly send someone out of a country, typically due to immigration violations or criminal activity. “Deport” specifically refers to the removal of non-citizens from a country.

  • For example, “The government plans to deport undocumented immigrants who have committed crimes.”
  • In a news headline, you might see, “Hundreds of immigrants deported in recent crackdown.”
  • A political commentator might say, “The controversial policy aims to deport individuals who pose a threat to national security.”

46. Extract

To remove something from its original place or position. “Extract” is often used when referring to the removal of something valuable or essential.

  • For example, a dentist might say, “I need to extract your wisdom tooth.”
  • In a cooking recipe, it might instruct, “Extract the juice from the lemon.”
  • A computer technician might advise, “To fix the issue, we’ll need to extract the corrupted files.”

47. Eject

To forcefully remove something or someone from a particular place or situation. “Eject” is commonly used when referring to the removal of an object or person from a vehicle or device.

  • For instance, a pilot might announce, “Please fasten your seatbelts as we prepare to eject.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I accidentally pressed the wrong button and got ejected from the match.”
  • A person discussing a malfunctioning DVD player might comment, “It keeps ejecting the disc without playing it.”

48. Ax

To remove or cut off with an ax, often in a forceful or abrupt manner. “Ax” is commonly used as a slang term for the act of removing or eliminating something.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to ax some positions to reduce costs.”
  • In a conversation about a failing project, someone might suggest, “Let’s just ax the whole thing and start over.”
  • A person discussing a breakup might say, “I finally axed that toxic relationship.”

49. Boot

To forcefully remove someone from a place or situation. “Boot” is often used as a slang term to describe the act of ejecting or expelling someone.

  • For instance, a bouncer might say, “I had to boot that unruly customer from the bar.”
  • In a discussion about a problematic roommate, someone might say, “I can’t wait to boot them out of the apartment.”
  • A person recounting a story might say, “I got booted from the party for causing a disturbance.”

50. Strip

To remove all covering or layers from something or someone. “Strip” is commonly used when referring to the removal of clothing or outer coverings.

  • For example, a model might say, “I had to strip down for the photoshoot.”
  • In a DIY project, someone might comment, “We need to strip the old paint before applying a new coat.”
  • A person discussing a car repair might say, “I had to strip the engine down to its basic components to fix the issue.”

51. Jettison

To throw or drop something from an aircraft or ship, typically in order to lighten the load or remove something unwanted. The term “jettison” can also be used metaphorically to mean getting rid of something or someone.

  • For example, “The captain had to jettison some cargo to prevent the ship from sinking.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to jettison this outdated marketing strategy and try something new.”
  • A person discussing a breakup might say, “I had to jettison my toxic ex from my life for my own well-being.”

52. Nix

To reject, cancel, or put an end to something. “Nix” is often used to indicate a refusal or denial of a request or suggestion.

  • For instance, “The boss nixed our proposal to extend the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m afraid I’ll have to nix the idea of going on vacation this year.”
  • A person discussing a potential purchase might say, “I had to nix the idea of buying a new car because of unexpected expenses.”

53. X-out

To mark something with an “X” or draw a line through it to indicate that it should be removed or disregarded. “X-out” is often used when referring to crossing out written or printed text.

  • For example, “I accidentally wrote the wrong date on the invitation, so I had to x-out the incorrect one and write the correct date.”
  • In a discussion about mistakes, someone might say, “I made a typo in the report, but I quickly x-ed it out and corrected it.”
  • A person discussing revisions might say, “I received feedback on my essay and had to x-out several paragraphs that were off-topic.”

54. Cull

To select or remove something from a group based on specific criteria. “Cull” is often used when referring to removing unwanted or inferior members from a group.

  • For instance, “The farmer had to cull the sick animals from the herd to prevent the spread of disease.”
  • In a conversation about data analysis, someone might say, “We need to cull the outliers from the dataset to ensure accurate results.”
  • A person discussing a collection might say, “I had to cull my book collection and donate the ones I no longer wanted.”

55. Bounce

To forcefully remove or expel someone or something from a place. “Bounce” is often used in a casual or slang context to indicate a quick or forceful removal.

  • For example, “The bouncer bounced the troublemaker out of the club.”
  • In a conversation about evictions, someone might say, “The landlord decided to bounce the troublesome tenants from the apartment.”
  • A person discussing a party might say, “The host had to bounce the unruly guests who were causing a disturbance.”

56. Erase

To remove or eliminate something completely or permanently. “Erase” is often used in the context of removing digital or physical information or objects.

  • For example, “I need to erase all the files on my computer before selling it.”
  • In a discussion about cleaning, someone might say, “I need to erase all the markings on this whiteboard.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically and say, “I want to erase all the bad memories from that trip.”

57. Expunge

To remove or erase something completely, especially from a record or document. “Expunge” is often used in legal or official contexts.

  • For instance, “The court ordered the criminal record to be expunged.”
  • In a conversation about editing, someone might say, “We need to expunge that paragraph from the final draft.”
  • A person discussing cleaning might say, “I want to expunge all the stains from this carpet.”

58. Liquidate

To convert assets or inventory into cash by selling them. “Liquidate” is often used in business or financial contexts.

  • For example, “The company decided to liquidate its remaining stock.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might say, “I’m planning to liquidate my shares in that company.”
  • A person discussing downsizing might say, “We need to liquidate some of our furniture before moving.”

59. Weed out

To eliminate or get rid of undesirable or unnecessary elements or individuals. “Weed out” is often used in the context of selecting or refining a group or collection.

  • For instance, “We need to weed out the weak candidates during the interview process.”
  • In a conversation about organizing, someone might say, “I need to weed out the old and unused items from my closet.”
  • A person discussing a project might say, “We need to weed out the irrelevant information from this report.”

60. Offload

To transfer or dispose of something, often by selling or giving it away. “Offload” is often used in the context of getting rid of a burden or unwanted item.

  • For example, “I need to offload some of my old furniture before moving.”
  • In a discussion about responsibilities, someone might say, “I need to offload some tasks onto my team members.”
  • A person discussing emotions might say, “I need to offload my stress by going for a run.”

61. Dismantle

This term refers to the act of taking apart or disassembling something, usually a complex object or structure.

  • For example, “The mechanic had to dismantle the engine to fix the problem.”
  • In a discussion about home renovations, someone might say, “We need to dismantle the old cabinets before installing the new ones.”
  • A person describing a difficult task might say, “It took hours to dismantle the tangled mess of wires.”
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