Top 59 Slang For Reply – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to online conversations, finding the perfect slang for reply can make all the difference in keeping the chat flowing smoothly. Whether you’re looking to add a touch of humor or simply want to show your agreement, our team has got you covered with a curated list of the trendiest and most effective slang phrases to use in your responses. Say goodbye to boring replies and hello to a whole new level of online communication with our must-read listicle!

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1. Thx

This is a shortened version of the word “thanks” and is commonly used to express gratitude or appreciation.

  • For example, “Thx for the help!”
  • A person might reply with “Thx” to show their appreciation for a kind gesture.
  • When someone compliments you, you can respond with “Thx!” to acknowledge their words.

2. Tks

Similar to “Thx,” “Tks” is another abbreviation for the word “thanks” and is often used to express gratitude or appreciation.

  • For instance, “Tks for the invite!”
  • When someone holds the door open for you, you can say “Tks” to show your appreciation.
  • A person might reply with “Tks!” to acknowledge a thoughtful gift.

3. TY

“TY” is a common abbreviation for “thank you” and is often used to express gratitude or appreciation.

  • For example, “TY for your help!”
  • When someone gives you a compliment, you can respond with “TY!” to show your gratitude.
  • A person might reply with “TY” when they receive a thoughtful gift.

4. NP

This abbreviation stands for “no problem” and is often used to indicate that something was not an issue or inconvenience.

  • For instance, “NP, happy to help!”
  • When someone apologizes for a small mistake, you can reply with “NP” to let them know it’s not a problem.
  • A person might say “NP” when someone thanks them for a favor they did.

5. YW

“YW” is a shortened version of the phrase “you’re welcome” and is commonly used as a response to express that something was done as a favor or to be polite.

  • For example, “YW, glad I could help!”
  • When someone thanks you for holding the door open, you can reply with “YW” to acknowledge their gratitude.
  • A person might say “YW” when someone expresses appreciation for a kind gesture.

6. Npnp

This is a casual way of acknowledging someone’s gratitude or thanks. It is often used to indicate that the person has no issue with helping or doing something for someone else.

  • For example, if someone says, “Thanks for helping me out,” you can reply with “Npnp!”
  • In a conversation where someone apologizes for a mistake, you might respond, “Npnp, we all make mistakes.”
  • If someone thanks you for a favor, you can reply with “Npnp, glad I could help!”

7. K

This is a short and informal way of acknowledging something or giving a quick response. It is often used in text messages or online conversations to indicate understanding or agreement.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re ready to go, you might reply with “K.”
  • In a discussion where someone suggests a plan, you can respond with “K, let’s do it.”
  • If someone asks if you’re okay with a certain decision, you can simply reply with “K.”

8. KK

Similar to “K,” this is another informal way of acknowledging something or giving a quick response. It is often used in text messages or online conversations to indicate understanding or agreement, but with a slightly more enthusiastic tone.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re free to hang out, you might reply with “KK.”
  • In a conversation where someone suggests a fun activity, you can respond with “KK, sounds like a plan!”
  • If someone asks if you’re okay with a certain decision and you’re particularly enthusiastic about it, you can reply with “KK!”

9. Sure thing

This is a casual way of expressing agreement or acceptance of a request or proposal. It is often used to indicate that you are willing to do something or that you have no objections.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can help them with a task, you might reply with “Sure thing!”
  • In a conversation where someone suggests grabbing dinner together, you can respond with “Sure thing, I’m hungry!”
  • If someone asks if you’re okay with a certain arrangement, you can simply reply with “Sure thing.”

10. Roger that

This is a phrase used to indicate that you have received and understood a message or instruction. It is often used in military or aviation contexts, but has also become a popular slang term for confirming understanding in everyday conversations.

  • For example, if someone gives you directions, you might reply with “Roger that.”
  • In a discussion where someone assigns you a task, you can respond with “Roger that, I’ll get it done.”
  • If someone asks if you understand a concept or plan, you can simply reply with “Roger that.”

11. Got it

This phrase is used to indicate that the person has understood or comprehended the message or information conveyed to them.

  • For example, if someone gives you instructions, you can respond with “Got it!”
  • In a team meeting, a coworker might say, “We need to finish this project by Friday.” You can reply, “Got it, I’ll make sure it gets done.”
  • If a teacher explains a concept to a student, the student can respond with “Got it, thanks for explaining.”

12. Copy that

This phrase is often used in military or radio communication to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood.

  • For instance, if a pilot receives instructions from air traffic control, they might respond with “Copy that.”
  • In a police radio conversation, an officer might say, “Dispatch, I’m en route to the location. Copy that.”
  • During a team mission, a member might receive instructions and reply, “Copy that, I’ll proceed as instructed.”

13. 10-4

This phrase is used to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood. It originated from the 10-code system used by law enforcement and the military.

  • For example, if someone asks if you can pick them up at a certain time, you can respond with “10-4.”
  • In a walkie-talkie conversation, one person might say, “I’m heading to the rendezvous point.” The other can reply, “10-4, I’ll meet you there.”
  • If a supervisor gives instructions to an employee, the employee can respond with “Roger that, I’ll get it done.”

14. Affirmative

This word is used to indicate agreement or confirmation of a statement or request.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re available for a meeting, you can respond with “Affirmative.”
  • In a military context, a commanding officer might give an order and a soldier can reply, “Affirmative, sir.”
  • If someone asks if you understand their explanation, you can reply with “Affirmative, I get it now.”

15. Yup

This is a casual and informal way of saying “yes.”

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to grab lunch, you can reply with “Yup.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask if everyone is ready to start a game, and you can respond with “Yup, let’s go.”
  • If a friend asks if you want to watch a movie, you can simply reply with “Yup, sounds good.”

16. Nah

A casual way to say “no” or express disagreement. It is often used in a laid-back or dismissive manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out tonight?” you might respond, “Nah, I’m staying in.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, one person might say, “I don’t agree with that idea.” The other might reply, “Nah, I think you’re missing the point.”
  • If someone suggests a plan that doesn’t interest you, you might simply say, “Nah, I’m not really into that.”

17. No worries

A phrase used to indicate that something is not a problem or inconvenience. It is often used to reassure someone that their request or action is not causing any trouble.

  • For instance, if someone apologizes for being late, you might respond, “No worries, it happens.”
  • If someone asks for a favor, you might say, “Sure, I can help you out. No worries.”
  • When someone expresses gratitude for your help, you might reply, “No worries, happy to assist.”

18. Cool

A versatile term used to express approval, agreement, or acceptance. It can also indicate that something is stylish or impressive.

  • For example, if someone suggests a plan, you might respond, “Cool, let’s do it.”
  • If someone asks if you’re okay with a decision, you might say, “Yeah, cool with me.”
  • When someone shows you something impressive, you might simply say, “Wow, that’s really cool.”

19. Sounds good

A phrase used to indicate that a suggestion or plan is acceptable or agreeable to you. It expresses a positive response without going into too much detail.

  • For instance, if someone proposes a time for a meeting, you might reply, “Sounds good, see you then.”
  • If someone suggests a restaurant for dinner, you might say, “Sounds good, I’ve heard good things about that place.”
  • When someone presents an idea for a project, you might respond, “Sounds good, let’s discuss the details further.”

20. I see

A phrase used to acknowledge that you have understood what someone has said or explained. It can indicate comprehension or agreement.

  • For example, if someone explains a concept to you, you might respond, “I see, that makes sense now.”
  • If someone shares their perspective on a topic, you might say, “I see where you’re coming from.”
  • When someone gives you instructions, you might reply, “I see, I’ll follow those steps.”

21. I hear you

This phrase is used to indicate that you have heard and understood someone’s message or point of view.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think we should focus on improving our communication skills,” you can reply with, “I hear you. That’s a valid point.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, you might say, “I understand your concerns. I hear you.”
  • If someone expresses frustration with a particular issue, you can respond with, “I hear you. It can be frustrating, but we’ll find a solution.”

22. Word

This slang term is used to express agreement or affirmation with what someone has said.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The party was amazing,” you can reply with, “Word! It was so much fun.”
  • In a discussion about a new movie, you might say, “I heard it’s really good.” The other person can respond with, “Word. I can’t wait to watch it.”
  • If someone shares an interesting fact, you can reply with, “Word. I didn’t know that.”

23. Bet

This slang term is used to express agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone says, “Let’s meet at the coffee shop at 3 pm,” you can reply with, “Bet. See you there.”
  • In a conversation about plans for the weekend, you might say, “I’m thinking of going hiking.” The other person can respond with, “Bet. I’ll join you.”
  • If someone suggests a solution to a problem, you can reply with, “Bet. That could work.”

24. Aight

This slang term is a shortened version of “alright” and is used to indicate agreement or acceptance.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you pass me the salt?” you can reply with, “Aight. Here you go.”
  • In a conversation about going out for dinner, you might say, “I’m fine with Italian food.” The other person can respond with, “Aight. Let’s go to that new Italian restaurant.”
  • If someone suggests a plan, you can reply with, “Aight. Sounds good to me.”

25. TBH

This acronym is used to preface an honest or candid statement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What do you think of my new haircut?” you can reply with, “TBH, I’m not a fan.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, you might say, “TBH, I found it a bit boring.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a particular topic, you can start your response with, “TBH, I’m not sure.”

26. IIRC

This acronym is used when someone is unsure about the accuracy of their statement but believes it to be true. It is often used to preface a statement or fact that the person is not 100% certain about.

  • For example, “IIRC, the meeting is scheduled for tomorrow.”
  • A user might say, “IIRC, the book was published in 2010.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might comment, “IIRC, the battle took place in 1863.”

27. IMO

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion, indicating that it is the personal viewpoint of the speaker. It is often used in online discussions or debates to make it clear that the statement is subjective.

  • For instance, “IMO, the movie was a masterpiece.”
  • A user might say, “IMO, pineapple does not belong on pizza.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “IMO, that outfit is not very stylish.”

28. ICYMI

This acronym is used to draw attention to something that has already been shared or discussed previously, but the speaker wants to make sure others are aware of it. It is often used when sharing news, articles, or important information.

  • For example, “ICYMI, there was a major announcement yesterday.”
  • A user might say, “ICYMI, the new season of the show premiered last night.”
  • In a discussion about current events, someone might comment, “ICYMI, there was a protest downtown yesterday.”

29. BTW

This acronym is used to introduce additional information or a side note in a conversation. It is often used to bring up a related topic or provide context.

  • For instance, “BTW, did you hear about the new restaurant opening?”
  • A user might say, “BTW, I’ll be out of town next week.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming plans, someone might comment, “BTW, the event starts at 7 PM.”

30. FWIW

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion that the speaker believes may not hold much value or importance, but they are sharing it anyway. It is often used to provide additional perspective or information.

  • For example, “FWIW, I think we should consider another approach.”
  • A user might say, “FWIW, I’ve tried that product before and wasn’t impressed.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might comment, “FWIW, I believe everyone should have equal rights.”

31. AFAIK

This acronym is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s knowledge and may not be 100% accurate. It’s often used to preface a statement or answer to a question.

  • For example, someone might say, “AFAIK, the party starts at 8pm.”
  • In an online discussion, a user might comment, “AFAIK, the company hasn’t released any official statements about the upcoming product.”
  • Another might respond, “AFAIK, the restaurant only accepts cash, so make sure to bring some.”

32. YMMV

This phrase is used to acknowledge that individual experiences may differ. It’s often used to indicate that the speaker’s opinion or advice may not apply to everyone.

  • For instance, someone might say, “YMMV, but I found that this product works really well for me.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, a user might comment, “YMMV, but I thought the ending was a bit anticlimactic.”
  • Another might add, “YMMV, but I didn’t have any issues with the customer service at that store.”

33. TL;DR

This acronym is used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or provide a concise version of the main points. It’s often used when someone wants to provide a quick summary or when they’re referring to a long article or post.

  • For example, someone might comment, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of climate change on marine life.”
  • In a discussion about a book, a user might say, “TL;DR: The main character overcomes adversity and finds true love.”
  • Another might add, “TL;DR: The study found that exercise has numerous health benefits.”

34. IMHO

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion, indicating that the speaker is sharing their personal viewpoint. It’s often used to express an opinion without sounding too assertive or confrontational.

  • For instance, someone might say, “IMHO, this restaurant serves the best pizza in town.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, a user might comment, “IMHO, the plot could have been more original.”
  • Another might add, “IMHO, the new policy will have a positive impact on the company’s productivity.”

35. SMH

This acronym is used to express disappointment, disbelief, or disapproval. It’s often used in response to something someone finds foolish, ridiculous, or frustrating.

  • For example, someone might comment, “SMH, I can’t believe they didn’t invite me to the party.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial statement, a user might say, “SMH, some people just don’t understand the importance of diversity.”
  • Another might add, “SMH, I can’t believe they’re still using outdated technology.”

36. LOL

This acronym is used to indicate that something is funny or amusing. It’s often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, if someone tells a funny joke, you might respond with “LOL!”
  • When someone shares a funny meme, you can comment “LOL, that’s hilarious!”
  • If someone sends you a funny video, you can reply with “LOL, I can’t stop laughing!”

37. BRB

This abbreviation is used to let someone know that you will be away from the conversation or activity temporarily and will return shortly.

  • For instance, if you’re in a chat with a friend and need to go grab a snack, you can say “BRB!”
  • If you’re in an online game and need to use the bathroom, you can type “BRB, nature calls!”
  • When you’re in a group chat and need to take a quick phone call, you can let everyone know by saying “BRB, phone ringing!”

38. TTYL

This phrase is used to indicate that you will talk to the person again at a later time or date. It’s commonly used to end a conversation or chat.

  • For example, if you’re wrapping up a phone call with a friend, you can say “TTYL!”
  • When you’re in an online chat and need to log off, you can say “I have to go now, TTYL!”
  • If you’re in a group chat and need to leave for the day, you can say “I’m signing off, TTYL everyone!”

39. NVM

This abbreviation is used to indicate that you no longer want to discuss or pursue a certain topic. It’s often used to dismiss or retract a previous statement.

  • For instance, if someone asks you a question and you realize you don’t have the answer, you can say “NVM, I don’t know.”
  • When you’re in a group chat and accidentally send the wrong message, you can quickly follow up with “NVM, ignore that!”
  • If you’re discussing weekend plans with a friend and they suggest something you’re not interested in, you can say “NVM, let’s do something else.”

40. IDK

This abbreviation is used to indicate that you don’t have the answer or knowledge about a certain question or topic. It’s commonly used when someone asks for information.

  • For example, if someone asks you what time a movie starts and you’re not sure, you can say “IDK, check the theater’s website.”
  • When you’re in a group chat and someone asks where to eat for dinner, you can respond with “IDK, I’m open to suggestions!”
  • If you’re playing a trivia game and someone asks you a difficult question, you can simply say “IDK, I’m stumped!”

41. ROFL

This acronym is used to express extreme amusement or laughter. It signifies that something is so funny that it would cause the person to roll on the floor laughing.

  • For example, “That joke was hilarious! I was ROFL.”
  • A user might comment, “ROFL, this meme is too funny!”
  • In response to a funny video, someone might say, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing!”

42. GTG

This abbreviation is used to indicate that the person needs to leave or end the conversation. It is commonly used in online chats or text messages as a quick way to let others know they have to go.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Sorry, GTG. Talk to you later!”
  • When ending a video call, someone might say, “GTG, thanks for the chat!”
  • In a group chat, a person might announce, “I have a meeting now, GTG!”

43. HTH

This abbreviation is often used to provide assistance or offer a solution to a problem. It is a polite way to end a message or response, indicating that the person hopes their information or advice is helpful.

  • For example, “You can try rebooting your computer. HTH!”
  • In a discussion forum, someone might say, “Here’s a link to a helpful article. HTH!”
  • When answering a question, a person might end their response with, “Let me know if you have any other questions. HTH!”

44. TMI

This acronym is used to indicate that someone has shared more personal or intimate details than necessary or appropriate. It is often used in response to an oversharing situation.

  • For instance, if someone shares explicit details about their personal life, a person might reply with “TMI!”
  • In a conversation about medical conditions, someone might say, “TMI, I don’t need to know about your symptoms.”
  • When a friend shares embarrassing stories, a person might playfully comment, “TMI, but thanks for the laugh!”

45. WBU

This abbreviation is used to ask for the other person’s opinion or response. It is often used in casual conversations or online discussions to keep the conversation balanced and show interest in the other person’s thoughts.

  • For example, “I just finished watching a great movie. WBU?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “I’m going to order pizza. WBU, what do you want?”
  • When discussing favorite books, a person might say, “I love fantasy novels. WBU, what genre do you enjoy?”

46. HBU

This is a shorthand way of asking someone for their opinion or response to a question or statement. It’s often used in casual conversations or online chats.

  • For example, if someone asks, “I’m going to the movies tonight. HBU?” they are asking if the other person also wants to go to the movies.
  • In a group chat, one person might say, “I’m craving pizza. HBU?” to see if others are interested in ordering pizza as well.
  • A friend might text, “Just finished watching a great TV show. HBU? Any recommendations?”

47. OIC

This is a common response to indicate understanding or acknowledgement of something. It’s often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For instance, if someone explains a concept to you, you might reply with “OIC” to show that you understand.
  • In a chat conversation, if someone shares their plans for the weekend, you might respond with “OIC” to acknowledge their message.
  • A coworker might email you with instructions, and you might reply with “OIC” to indicate that you have read and understood the message.
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48. NBD

This is a casual expression used to downplay the significance or importance of something. It’s often used to indicate that a situation or action is not a cause for concern or worry.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a minor mistake, you might respond with “NBD” to reassure them that it’s not a big deal.
  • In a conversation about a small inconvenience, someone might say, “I forgot to bring my umbrella today.” The other person might reply with “NBD, it’s not raining anyway.”
  • A friend might cancel plans last minute, and you might respond with “NBD, we can reschedule.”

49. Will do

This is a simple and straightforward way of expressing agreement or acceptance of a request or task. It’s often used to confirm that you will take action or follow through on something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can pick up groceries on your way home, you might respond with “Will do” to indicate that you will do it.
  • In a work setting, if a colleague asks if you can complete a task by the end of the day, you might reply with “Will do” to confirm.
  • A friend might ask if you can bring snacks to a party, and you might say, “Sure, will do.”

50. Yep

This is a casual and informal way of saying “yes.” It’s often used in everyday conversations and can indicate agreement, affirmation, or acknowledgment.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to grab dinner, you might respond with “Yep” to indicate that you are interested.
  • In a chat conversation, if someone shares good news, you might reply with “Yep” to show your excitement or agreement.
  • A coworker might ask if you are available for a meeting, and you might reply with “Yep” to confirm your availability.
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51. All good

This phrase is used to indicate that everything is okay or there are no issues.

  • For example, if someone asks if you need any help, you can reply, “No, I’m all good.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, you can respond, “It’s all good, don’t worry about it.”
  • When confirming a plan, you can say, “All good, see you then!”

52. Negative

This word is used to indicate a negative response or to deny something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you have any allergies, you can reply, “Negative, I don’t have any.”
  • In a military context, a commander might use the word to indicate a negative response to a request, such as “Negative, we cannot proceed with the mission.”
  • When someone offers you something you don’t want, you can simply say, “Negative, thank you.”

53. Understood

This word is used to indicate that you have comprehended or grasped what someone has said or instructed.

  • For example, if someone gives you directions, you can reply, “Understood, I know where to go.”
  • In a workplace setting, if your boss assigns you a task, you can respond, “Understood, I’ll get right on it.”
  • When someone explains something to you, you can acknowledge understanding by saying, “Understood, thanks for explaining.”

54. Gotcha

This phrase is used to indicate that you have understood or comprehended something.

  • For instance, if someone explains a joke to you, you can reply, “Gotcha, I get it now.”
  • In a conversation where someone gives you important information, you can respond, “Gotcha, I’ll keep that in mind.”
  • When someone asks if you understand their instructions, you can simply say, “Gotcha.”

55. Aye aye

This phrase is used to indicate that you have heard and understood an order or instruction, and you will follow it.

  • For example, in a military or naval context, when a superior officer gives a command, the response might be, “Aye aye, sir!”
  • In a workplace setting, if your boss gives you a direct order, you can reply, “Aye aye, I’ll get it done.”
  • When someone asks if you will do something, you can respond, “Aye aye, I’ll take care of it.”

56. Rgr

This is a term used to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood. It is commonly used in military and aviation contexts.

  • For example, a pilot might respond to a control tower with “Rgr, cleared for takeoff.”
  • In a military operation, a soldier might say, “Rgr, moving to the next objective.”
  • In a radio communication, a person might respond with “Rgr, understood.”

57. Ack

Similar to “Rgr,” this term is used to indicate that a message has been received and understood. It is often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For instance, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Ack, we will proceed with the plan.”
  • In a customer service interaction, a representative might respond with “Ack, we will address your concern.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might use “Ack” to confirm understanding of an order.
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58. Duly noted

This phrase is used to indicate that a message or information has been received and will be remembered or taken into consideration.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Your suggestion has been duly noted.”
  • In a discussion, a person might respond with “Duly noted, we will take that into account.”
  • In a formal email, someone might write, “Duly noted, thank you for bringing this to our attention.”

59. Loud and clear

This phrase is used to confirm that a message has been received and understood, often in situations where clear communication is crucial.

  • For instance, a radio operator might respond with “Loud and clear” to confirm reception of a transmission.
  • In a team communication, someone might say, “Message received, loud and clear.”
  • In a military operation, a soldier might use this phrase to indicate understanding of an order.