Top 55 Slang For Resolve – Meaning & Usage

When faced with challenges or obstacles, having the right slang for resolve can be empowering and motivating. Whether you’re looking to boost your own determination or inspire others, our team has compiled a list of the top slang terms that embody strength, perseverance, and unwavering determination. Get ready to level up your vocabulary and conquer any hurdle that comes your way with these powerful expressions!

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1. Settle the score

This phrase is often used to describe resolving a conflict or seeking revenge against someone who has wronged you. It can refer to both physical altercations and metaphorical battles.

  • For example, two rivals might agree to settle the score on the basketball court.
  • In a movie, a character might say, “I’ll settle the score with him for what he did to my family.”
  • A person discussing a long-standing grudge might say, “It’s time to settle the score and finally put this behind us.”

2. Hammer out

To “hammer out” means to reach an agreement or solution through discussion or negotiation. It implies a process of working through details and differences to come to a resolution.

  • For instance, two business partners might need to hammer out the details of a contract.
  • In a political debate, opposing sides might try to hammer out a compromise.
  • A person discussing a difficult decision might say, “We spent hours hammering out the pros and cons before reaching a conclusion.”

3. Work out

To “work out” means to resolve or find a solution to a problem. It can refer to both personal and professional issues that require resolution.

  • For example, a couple might go to therapy to work out their relationship problems.
  • In a team project, members might need to work out the logistics and division of tasks.
  • A person discussing a disagreement might say, “We need to sit down and work out our differences before things escalate.”

4. Clear the air

To “clear the air” means to resolve conflicts or misunderstandings by addressing the issues openly and honestly. It’s a way to bring clarity and understanding to a situation.

  • For instance, two friends might have a heart-to-heart conversation to clear the air after a disagreement.
  • In a workplace, a manager might call a meeting to clear the air and address any lingering tensions.
  • A person discussing a strained relationship might say, “We need to clear the air and have an honest conversation about our feelings.”

5. Patch things up

To “patch things up” means to reconcile or repair a relationship or situation that has been damaged or strained. It implies a process of fixing the issues and working towards resolution.

  • For example, two friends might meet up to patch things up after a falling out.
  • In a family dispute, siblings might come together to patch things up and move forward.
  • A person discussing a broken friendship might say, “I hope we can patch things up and rebuild our bond.”

6. Face the music

This phrase means to confront or deal with the negative consequences of one’s actions. It implies taking responsibility and not avoiding or running away from the situation.

  • For example, if someone makes a mistake at work, their boss might say, “You need to face the music and apologize to the client.”
  • In a personal relationship, a friend might advise, “It’s time to face the music and have an honest conversation about your feelings.”
  • If someone is avoiding a difficult task, a mentor might say, “You can’t keep procrastinating, it’s time to face the music and get it done.”

7. Square away

This phrase means to put things in order or to finish a task. It suggests tidying up loose ends and ensuring everything is in its proper place.

  • For instance, a supervisor might instruct their team, “Before you leave for the day, make sure to square away your workstations.”
  • If someone is planning a trip, they might say, “I just need to square away a few details before I can book the tickets.”
  • In a military context, a sergeant might tell their soldiers, “Let’s square away our gear and get ready for the mission.”

8. Crack the code

This phrase means to figure out or decipher something that was previously unknown or difficult to understand. It suggests uncovering the key to unlocking a mystery or resolving a complex situation.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I’m determined to crack the code and solve this case.”
  • In a puzzle-solving game, a player might exclaim, “I finally cracked the code and unlocked the secret room!”
  • If someone is struggling with a difficult math problem, a teacher might encourage them, “Keep trying, you’ll crack the code eventually.”

9. Wrap up

This phrase means to complete or bring to an end. It implies putting the final touches on something or reaching a resolution.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “Let’s wrap up this meeting and summarize the action items.”
  • If someone is finishing a phone call, they might say, “I need to wrap up this conversation and get back to work.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “With only a few minutes left, the team needs to wrap up the game and secure the win.”

10. Nip it in the bud

This phrase means to address or resolve an issue at its early stages, before it escalates or becomes more challenging to handle. It suggests taking proactive measures to prevent a problem from worsening.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “We need to nip this behavior in the bud before it spreads to other employees.”
  • If someone notices a potential conflict, they might advise, “Let’s address this issue now and nip it in the bud before it gets out of hand.”
  • In a personal situation, a friend might say, “If you’re feeling stressed, it’s important to take care of yourself and nip it in the bud before it affects your mental health.”

11. Call it a day

This phrase is used to indicate that it is time to stop working on a particular task or project and consider it completed or finished for the day.

  • For example, after a long day of work, someone might say, “Let’s call it a day and continue tomorrow.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We’ve made great progress, let’s call it a day and reconvene in the morning.”
  • A coworker might suggest, “It’s getting late, let’s call it a day and go grab dinner.”

12. Put to bed

This phrase is used to indicate that a problem or issue has been resolved or settled.

  • For instance, after a long discussion or debate, someone might say, “Let’s put this issue to bed and move on.”
  • In a project meeting, a team member might suggest, “We need to put this problem to bed before moving forward.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “I want to put this project to bed by the end of the week.”

13. Close the book

This phrase is used to indicate that a particular matter or situation is considered closed or resolved.

  • For example, after a thorough investigation, a detective might say, “We can finally close the book on this case.”
  • In a business meeting, a decision-maker might state, “Let’s close the book on this project and start focusing on the next one.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Once you’ve finished your final exam, we can close the book on this semester.”

14. Lay to rest

This phrase is used to indicate that a conflict, argument, or disagreement has been resolved or settled.

  • For instance, after a heated debate, someone might say, “Let’s lay this issue to rest and move on.”
  • In a family discussion, a member might suggest, “We need to lay these differences to rest and start supporting each other.”
  • A mediator might help two parties reach an agreement and say, “I’m glad we were able to lay this dispute to rest and find a solution.”

15. Seal the deal

This phrase is used to indicate that a negotiation or agreement has been successfully completed and finalized.

  • For example, after reaching a business agreement, someone might say, “Now, let’s seal the deal with a handshake.”
  • In a real estate transaction, a buyer might state, “I’m ready to seal the deal and sign the contract.”
  • A salesperson might say, “Once we’ve agreed on the price, we can seal the deal and proceed with the purchase.”

16. Button up

This phrase means to organize or finalize everything, especially before a deadline or important event. It can also refer to being well-dressed or put together.

  • For example, “I need to button up this report before the meeting tomorrow.”
  • A person getting ready for a job interview might say, “I want to button up my appearance and make a good impression.”
  • In a conversation about planning a party, someone might suggest, “Let’s button up the details and send out the invitations.”

17. Knock it out

This slang phrase means to accomplish or finish something quickly and efficiently. It can also imply overcoming obstacles or challenges.

  • For instance, “I have a lot of work to do, but I’m determined to knock it out.”
  • A person discussing a project might say, “We’re going to work late tonight to knock it out before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult puzzle, someone might say, “I finally figured it out and knocked it out.”

18. Set things right

This phrase means to resolve or rectify a problem or issue. It implies taking action to make things better or restore order.

  • For example, “I made a mistake, but I’m determined to set things right.”
  • A person discussing a conflict might say, “We need to have a conversation and find a way to set things right.”
  • In a conversation about repairing a relationship, someone might suggest, “Let’s apologize and make an effort to set things right.”

19. Dig in

This slang phrase means to fully engage or invest oneself in a task or situation. It can also imply perseverance or determination.

  • For instance, “I’m going to dig in and finish this project no matter what.”
  • A person discussing a difficult challenge might say, “It’s time to dig in and find a solution.”
  • In a conversation about a long-term commitment, someone might say, “We need to dig in and make this work.”

20. Stick to your guns

This phrase means to hold steadfastly to one’s principles, beliefs, or decisions, especially in the face of opposition or criticism.

  • For example, “Even when others disagree, it’s important to stick to your guns.”
  • A person discussing a controversial topic might say, “I’m going to stick to my guns and defend my position.”
  • In a conversation about making a tough decision, someone might advise, “Trust your instincts and stick to your guns.”

21. Stand your ground

This phrase means to hold your position and not back down, especially in the face of opposition or adversity. It emphasizes the importance of standing up for what you believe in and not being easily swayed.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “I will stand my ground and defend my viewpoint.”
  • In a difficult situation, a person might encourage themselves by saying, “I need to stand my ground and not let others dictate my choices.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re facing a tough opponent, but we need to stand our ground and give it our all.”

22. Tough it out

This phrase means to persevere or endure a difficult or challenging situation without giving up. It implies the need to toughen up mentally and physically in order to overcome obstacles.

  • For instance, if someone is going through a tough time, they might say, “I just need to tough it out and things will get better.”
  • In a physically demanding activity, such as a marathon, a runner might tell themselves, “I have to tough it out and reach the finish line.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You’re going through a rough patch, but I know you can tough it out and come out stronger.”

23. Soldier on

This phrase means to continue moving forward or persisting despite difficulties or setbacks. It evokes the image of a soldier marching on despite the challenges they face.

  • For example, if someone is facing a series of obstacles, they might say, “I just have to soldier on and not give up.”
  • In a long and tiring project, a person might remind themselves, “I need to soldier on and finish what I started.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee by saying, “Life can be tough, but you have to soldier on and keep pursuing your goals.”

24. Keep at it

This phrase means to continue doing something consistently and not giving up, especially in the face of challenges or setbacks. It emphasizes the importance of perseverance and determination.

  • For instance, if someone is learning a new skill, they might say, “I need to keep at it and practice regularly to improve.”
  • In a difficult project, a person might encourage themselves by saying, “I just need to keep at it and find a solution.”
  • A teacher might motivate their students by saying, “Keep at it, even if it gets tough. Your hard work will pay off.”

25. Push through

This phrase means to persevere and overcome difficulties or obstacles. It implies the need to exert effort and determination in order to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, if someone is facing a challenging task, they might say, “I just need to push through and get it done.”
  • In a physically demanding activity, such as a tough workout, a person might tell themselves, “I can push through the pain and reach my fitness goals.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re down, but we need to push through and give it our all until the end.”

26. Hang in there

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue despite facing challenges or difficulties. It implies staying strong and not giving up.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I know it’s tough, but hang in there, things will get better.”
  • When facing a long and difficult task, someone might say, “I just need to hang in there and keep working.”
  • In a motivational speech, a speaker might say, “Life may knock you down, but hang in there and keep fighting.”

27. Power through

This phrase means to continue with determination and strength, even when faced with obstacles or fatigue. It implies using one’s inner strength to overcome challenges.

  • For instance, when feeling tired during a workout, someone might say, “I just need to power through these last few reps.”
  • When facing a difficult project, a colleague might say, “Let’s power through and get it done.”
  • In a marathon, a runner might encourage themselves by saying, “Just keep powering through, you’re almost there.”

28. Grind it out

To “grind it out” means to persist and continue working hard, even when the task is challenging or tedious. It implies putting in consistent effort to achieve a goal.

  • For example, when studying for exams, someone might say, “I just need to grind it out and keep reviewing.”
  • In a competitive sport, a coach might encourage their team by saying, “We need to grind it out and give it our all.”
  • When facing a long and difficult project, a coworker might say, “Let’s grind it out together and get it done.”

29. Stay the course

This phrase means to continue on the current path or strategy, despite obstacles or doubts. It implies staying committed and not deviating from the original plan.

  • For instance, when facing criticism or doubt, someone might say, “I will stay the course and prove them wrong.”
  • In a business meeting, a leader might say, “We need to stay the course and trust our strategy.”
  • When pursuing a long-term goal, a mentor might advise, “Stay the course and don’t let setbacks deter you.”

30. Grit your teeth

To “grit your teeth” means to bear or endure a difficult or challenging situation with determination. It implies facing adversity with resilience and resolve.

  • For example, when going through a tough time, someone might say, “I just need to grit my teeth and keep going.”
  • In a physical competition, a coach might encourage their athlete by saying, “Grit your teeth and give it your all.”
  • When facing a daunting task, a friend might say, “Grit your teeth and tackle it one step at a time.”

31. Press on

To keep going despite challenges or obstacles.

  • For example, “Even though it’s difficult, we need to press on and finish the project.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might say, “When things get tough, remember to press on and never give up.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “We’re down, but we can press on and turn the game around.”

32. Keep on keeping on

To continue doing something without giving up.

  • For instance, “No matter what happens, we need to keep on keeping on and reach our goals.”
  • In a conversation about career challenges, someone might say, “Sometimes all you can do is keep on keeping on and trust that things will improve.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I know it’s tough, but you’re strong. Just keep on keeping on.”

33. Persevere

To persist in the face of difficulty or adversity.

  • For example, “She had to persevere through many obstacles to achieve her dreams.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Perseverance is key to overcoming challenges and reaching success.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “Don’t give up! Persevere and you’ll see progress.”

34. Tough out

To withstand a difficult situation or tough it out.

  • For instance, “Even though it’s tough, we need to tough it out and finish the race.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging job, someone might say, “Sometimes you just have to tough it out until better opportunities come along.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “This game is tough, but we’re tough too. Let’s tough it out and give it our all.”

35. Stick it out

To continue with something until its completion, despite challenges or difficulties.

  • For example, “Even though it’s hard, we need to stick it out and see this project through.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Sometimes you have to stick it out and work through the tough times.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee by saying, “Don’t give up easily. Stick it out and you’ll learn valuable lessons.”

36. Smooth over

To smooth over means to resolve a conflict or tension between two parties in a calm and diplomatic manner.

  • For example, “I had a disagreement with my coworker, but we were able to smooth things over and work together again.”
  • In a family dispute, someone might say, “Let’s sit down and have a conversation to smooth over our differences.”
  • A couple might use this phrase to describe their efforts to resolve an argument, saying, “We had a long talk to smooth things over and strengthen our relationship.”

37. Straighten out

To straighten out means to resolve a problem or confusion by clarifying or correcting the situation.

  • For instance, “I need to straighten out this misunderstanding with my boss before it affects my job.”
  • If there is a mix-up in a schedule, someone might say, “Let’s straighten out the dates and make sure everyone is on the same page.”
  • When facing a complicated task, a person might say, “I need some time to straighten out the details and come up with a plan.”

38. Set right

To set right means to correct or resolve a situation that is not going as desired.

  • For example, “I made a mistake, but I will do everything I can to set things right.”
  • If someone has caused harm, they might say, “I want to set things right and make amends for my actions.”
  • When faced with a problem, a person might say, “I need to figure out how to set things right and find a solution.”

39. Fix things

To fix things means to resolve or repair a situation that is broken or not functioning properly.

  • For instance, “We need to sit down and have a conversation to fix things between us.”
  • If a relationship is strained, someone might say, “We need to work on communication to fix things.”
  • When faced with a problem, a person might say, “Let’s brainstorm solutions and find a way to fix things.”

40. Nail down

To nail down means to resolve or finalize a decision or plan by determining all the necessary details.

  • For example, “We need to nail down the specifics of our project before moving forward.”
  • If there is uncertainty about a schedule, someone might say, “Let’s nail down the dates so everyone knows when to expect us.”
  • When making arrangements, a person might say, “I will call and nail down the details with the event organizer.”

41. Buck up

To “buck up” means to encourage oneself or someone else to be more positive or resilient in the face of a difficult situation.

  • For example, if a friend is feeling down, you might say, “Come on, buck up! Things will get better.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “We’re behind, but it’s not over yet. Buck up and give it your all!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You didn’t get the lead in the play, but buck up and keep trying. Your time will come.”

42. Get down to business

To “get down to business” means to stop wasting time and start focusing on the task at hand.

  • For instance, if a group of people are having a casual conversation before a meeting, someone might say, “Alright, let’s get down to business and start discussing the agenda.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might tell their employee, “Stop procrastinating and get down to business. We have a deadline to meet.”
  • A student might say to their study partner, “Enough chatting. Let’s get down to business and finish this assignment.”

43. Get your head in the game

To “get your head in the game” means to start focusing and paying attention to what is happening around you, especially in a competitive or important situation.

  • For example, a coach might shout at their player, “Get your head in the game! We need you to concentrate and play your best.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might say to a daydreaming student, “Stop zoning out and get your head in the game. We’re discussing an important topic.”
  • A friend might say to their friend who seems distracted, “Come on, get your head in the game and enjoy the concert.”

44. Put your foot down

To “put your foot down” means to assert yourself and take a firm stance on a particular issue or decision.

  • For instance, if a parent is tired of their child’s constant requests for candy, they might say, “I’m putting my foot down. No more candy.”
  • In a relationship, if one partner feels their boundaries are being crossed, they might say, “I need to put my foot down and establish some ground rules.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “We’ve been too lenient with deadlines. It’s time to put our foot down and enforce stricter timelines.”

45. Hunker down

To “hunker down” means to prepare for a difficult or challenging situation by getting ready and taking necessary precautions.

  • For example, if a severe storm is approaching, someone might say, “We need to hunker down and gather supplies.”
  • In a work context, if a team is facing a tight deadline, a leader might say, “It’s time to hunker down and put in some extra hours to meet the deadline.”
  • A friend might advise another friend who is going through a tough time, “Take some time to hunker down and take care of yourself. Things will get better.”

46. Dig in your heels

This phrase means to refuse to change your mind or position, and to be determined to stick to your beliefs or decisions despite opposition or difficulties.

  • For example, “The team dug in their heels and refused to back down from their demands.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “I’m going to dig in my heels and fight for what I believe is fair.”
  • When facing a tough situation, a person might decide to “dig in their heels and face the challenge head-on.”

47. Get cracking

This phrase means to begin a task or project, often with a sense of urgency or determination.

  • For instance, “We need to get cracking on this report before the deadline.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Let’s all get cracking and finish this project together.”
  • When faced with a long to-do list, a person might say, “I better get cracking if I want to finish everything on time.”

48. Roll up your sleeves

This phrase means to prepare oneself for hard work or physical labor.

  • For example, “It’s time to roll up our sleeves and get this job done.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might say, “Roll up your sleeves and show the world what you’re capable of.”
  • When faced with a challenging task, a person might say, “I’m ready to roll up my sleeves and give it my all.”

49. Face the challenge

This phrase means to confront and overcome difficulties or obstacles head-on.

  • For instance, “It’s time to face the challenge and prove ourselves.”
  • In a pep talk, someone might say, “Don’t be afraid to face the challenge and give it your best.”
  • When discussing a difficult situation, a person might say, “We can’t avoid it any longer, we have to face the challenge and find a solution.”

50. Get on the ball

This phrase means to start taking action or making progress on a task or goal.

  • For example, “We need to get on the ball and start working on this project.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get on the ball and brainstorm ideas.”
  • When feeling behind schedule, a person might say, “I better get on the ball if I want to meet the deadline.”

51. Get your ducks in a row

This phrase means to get all the necessary things or elements in order or properly arranged before taking action or making a decision.

  • For example, “Before starting the project, make sure to get your ducks in a row by gathering all the required materials and information.”
  • A manager might say to their team, “Let’s get our ducks in a row before presenting the proposal to the client.”
  • Someone giving advice might suggest, “If you want to succeed, you need to get your ducks in a row and have a clear plan.”

52. Buck up your ideas

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to start taking action, get motivated, or improve their performance.

  • For instance, a coach might say to a player, “You need to buck up your ideas if you want to make the team.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “It’s time to buckle down and buck up your ideas for the upcoming exams.”
  • A friend might encourage another friend by saying, “Come on, buck up your ideas and start working towards your goals.”

53. Get on top of it

This phrase means to gain control or handle a situation effectively and efficiently.

  • For example, if someone is struggling with a project, a mentor might say, “You need to get on top of it and start managing your time better.”
  • A manager might tell an employee, “I need you to get on top of this issue and find a solution as soon as possible.”
  • A friend might advise another friend, “If you want to succeed in your job, you need to get on top of your tasks and prioritize your responsibilities.”

54. Get your house in order

This phrase means to organize or fix one’s personal or professional life, address any issues or problems, and ensure everything is in order.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling with their finances, a financial advisor might say, “It’s time to get your house in order and create a budget.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Before going out with friends, make sure to get your house in order by completing your chores.”
  • A life coach might advise their client, “To achieve your goals, you need to get your house in order by decluttering your environment and setting clear priorities.”

55. Get your act in gear

This phrase means to get motivated, start taking action, or improve one’s performance.

  • For example, if someone is procrastinating, a friend might say, “It’s time to get your act in gear and start working on that project.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We need to get our act in gear if we want to win the game.”
  • A teacher might encourage a student by saying, “You have the potential, but you need to get your act in gear and put in the effort to succeed.”
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