Top 67 Slang For Response – Meaning & Usage

In today’s fast-paced digital world, effective communication is key. Whether you’re texting, commenting on social media, or engaging in online conversations, knowing the right slang for response can make all the difference. At Fluentslang, we’ve done the research and compiled a list of the most popular and useful slang phrases to help you navigate the world of online communication with ease. From witty comebacks to casual affirmations, this list has got you covered. Get ready to up your response game and become a master of online banter!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Clap back

When someone “claps back,” they are responding to a comment or criticism with a clever or sassy comeback. This term is often used in online discussions or social media.

  • For example, if someone insults you on Twitter, you might clap back with a witty response.
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “She really knows how to clap back!”
  • A celebrity might use their platform to clap back at rumors or negative press.

2. Flex

To “flex” means to show off or boast about something, usually to impress others or gain recognition. This term is often used when someone is proud of an accomplishment or material possession.

  • For instance, if someone buys a new luxury car, they might flex by posting a photo on social media.
  • In a conversation about achievements, someone might say, “I’m going to flex a little and mention my promotion.”
  • A person might flex their muscles to show off their physical strength.

3. What’s up?

This is a casual greeting or question used to ask how someone is or what they are currently doing. It is a common slang phrase used in casual conversations.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, you might say, “Hey, what’s up?”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “What’s up? Anything interesting happening?”
  • A person might use this phrase to start a conversation, saying, “So, what’s up with you lately?”

4. I feel you

When someone says “I feel you,” they are expressing that they understand or empathize with what another person is going through. It is a way of showing support or agreement.

  • For instance, if someone shares a personal struggle, you might respond with “I feel you. I’ve been through something similar.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, someone might say, “I feel you. It’s tough, but we’ll get through it.”
  • A person might use this phrase to connect with someone who has experienced a similar emotion or circumstance.

5. I get it

When someone says “I get it,” they are indicating that they understand or comprehend something. It is a way of acknowledging that they have grasped the meaning or concept being discussed.

  • For example, if someone explains a complicated math problem, you might say, “I get it now. Thanks for explaining.”
  • In a conversation about a complex topic, someone might say, “I think I’m starting to get it, but can you explain it again?”
  • A person might use this phrase to show that they have understood a joke or punchline.

6. No worries

This phrase is used to reassure someone that there is no need to be concerned or apologize. It is often used in response to an apology or to let someone know that their request or favor is not a problem.

  • For example, if someone says, “Sorry for the late reply,” you can respond with “No worries!”
  • If someone asks for a favor, you can say, “Sure, I can do that. No worries.”
  • When someone thanks you for something, you can reply with “No worries, happy to help!”

7. Cool beans

This expression is used to show approval or excitement about something. It is often used to acknowledge good news or to express enthusiasm.

  • For instance, if someone tells you they got a promotion, you can respond with “Cool beans!”
  • If someone shares an exciting plan or idea, you can say, “Wow, cool beans!”
  • When someone tells you about a positive experience, you can react with “Cool beans, that sounds amazing!”

8. Word

This slang term is used to show agreement or understanding. It can also be used to acknowledge a statement or to indicate that you have heard and understood what someone said.

  • For example, if someone says, “The party starts at 8 pm,” you can respond with “Word!”
  • If someone shares an opinion and you agree, you can say, “Word, I totally agree.”
  • When someone gives you instructions, you can reply with “Word, I got it.”

9. Bet

This slang term is used to indicate agreement, acceptance, or understanding. It can be used as a response to a request or proposal, or to confirm that you are on board with something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can meet them at a certain time, you can reply with “Bet!”
  • If someone suggests going out for dinner and you’re up for it, you can say, “Bet, let’s do it.”
  • When someone asks if you understand a concept, you can respond with “Bet, I get it.”

10. Lit

This slang term is used to describe something that is highly enjoyable, exciting, or impressive. It is often used to express enthusiasm or to indicate that something is exceptionally good.

  • For example, if someone tells you about a great party they attended, you can say, “Wow, that sounds lit!”
  • If someone shares a video or song that you find impressive, you can comment, “This is so lit!”
  • When someone describes an exciting event or experience, you can respond with “That sounds lit, I wish I could have been there!”

11. Facts

Used to emphasize that something is true or accurate.

  • For example, if someone makes a statement and another person agrees, they might say, “Facts, bro.”
  • In a conversation about a recent news article, someone might comment, “These facts are undeniable.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s story with, “Facts, that’s hilarious!”

12. Say less

Used to indicate that the speaker understands or agrees with what has been said and requires no further explanation or persuasion.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you want to go out for dinner and you’re already hungry, you might respond, “Say less, I’m down.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, if someone suggests going to the beach and you’re in the mood for some sun, you might say, “Say less, let’s do it!”
  • A friend might propose a road trip, and you might respond, “Say less, I’ll start packing.”

13. You good?

Used to inquire about someone’s well-being or state of mind.

  • For example, if someone looks upset or distressed, you might ask, “Hey, you good?”
  • If a friend cancels plans at the last minute, you might text them, “Everything alright? You good?”
  • In a conversation about a stressful situation, someone might ask, “You good? Need to talk?”

14. For sure

Used to express agreement, confirmation, or certainty.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re coming to the party, you might respond, “For sure, wouldn’t miss it.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, if someone suggests seeing a movie and you’re interested, you might say, “For sure, let’s do it!”
  • A friend might ask if you need a ride, and you might reply, “For sure, thanks!”

15. Gotcha

Used to indicate that the speaker understands or has received the information or message.

  • For example, if someone explains a complex concept and asks if you understand, you might respond, “Gotcha, thanks for explaining.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up, if someone gives you directions and you understand, you might say, “Gotcha, I’ll see you there!”
  • A friend might tell you a funny joke and ask if you get it, and you might reply, “Gotcha, that’s hilarious!”

16. Alrighty then

This phrase is used to indicate that someone agrees with or understands what has been said or requested.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you finish this task by tomorrow?” a response might be, “Alrighty then, I’ll get right on it.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think we should go with option A,” and the other might reply, “Alrighty then, let’s do it.”
  • When someone gives instructions, another person might respond with, “Alrighty then, I’ll make sure to follow those steps.”

17. Roger that

This phrase is used to indicate that a message has been received and understood.

  • For instance, in military or aviation contexts, it is common to use “Roger that” to acknowledge an instruction or order.
  • In a conversation, if someone says, “Please let me know when you arrive,” the response might be, “Roger that, I’ll give you a call.”
  • When someone asks for confirmation, another person might reply, “Roger that, I’ll double-check the details.”

18. Copy that

This phrase is used to indicate that a message has been received and understood, similar to “Roger that.”

  • For example, in a radio communication, if someone says, “Please confirm your location,” the response might be, “Copy that, I’m currently at coordinates X, Y.”
  • In a conversation, if someone gives instructions, another person might reply, “Copy that, I’ll follow the steps exactly.”
  • When someone asks for confirmation, another person might say, “Copy that, I understand what needs to be done.”

19. On it

This phrase is used to indicate that someone will take immediate action or give immediate attention to a task or request.

  • For instance, if someone says, “We need someone to fix this problem,” a response might be, “On it, I’ll find a solution right away.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “We’re running low on supplies,” and the other might reply, “On it, I’ll place an order for more.”
  • When someone assigns a task, another person might respond with, “On it, I’ll get started immediately.”

20. Noted

This word is used to indicate that a message or information has been received and acknowledged.

  • For example, if someone provides instructions, another person might respond with, “Noted, I’ll make sure to follow them.”
  • In a conversation, if someone shares important details, another person might say, “Noted, I’ll remember that.”
  • When someone gives feedback or suggestions, another person might reply, “Noted, I’ll take that into consideration.”

21. Understood

This is a simple and informal way to acknowledge that you have understood what someone has said or asked of you.

  • For example, if your boss gives you instructions, you might respond with “Understood, I’ll get right on it.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “So we’re all in agreement? Understood.”
  • If someone asks if you can attend a meeting, you might reply, “Understood, I’ll make sure to clear my schedule.”

22. Comeback

A comeback is a quick and clever response to a comment or insult. It is often used to counter or challenge someone’s statement or to defend oneself.

  • For instance, if someone makes a joke at your expense, a good comeback might be, “If I wanted my own comeback, I’d wipe it off your mom’s chin.”
  • During a playful banter, one person might say, “You think you’re so smart?” and the other might reply, “I’m smart enough to know I’m smarter than you.”
  • In a friendly argument, someone might say, “Oh yeah? Well, the jerk store called, and they’re running out of you!”

23. Rebuttal

A rebuttal is a response that challenges or contradicts a previous statement or argument. It is often used in debates or discussions to present an opposing viewpoint or to provide evidence against a claim.

  • For example, if someone says, “Chocolate ice cream is the best,” a rebuttal might be, “Actually, vanilla is the most popular flavor worldwide.”
  • In a political debate, one candidate might present a rebuttal to their opponent’s statement by saying, “That’s simply not true. Here are the facts.”
  • During a courtroom trial, a defense attorney might offer a rebuttal to the prosecution’s argument by presenting an alternative explanation.
See also  Top 25 Slang For Early – Meaning & Usage

24. Repartee

Repartee refers to a quick and witty exchange of conversation or banter between two or more people. It often involves clever remarks, humorous comebacks, and playful verbal sparring.

  • For instance, during a friendly chat, one person might say, “You always have something clever to say,” and the other might reply, “It’s a gift, what can I say?”
  • In a comedy show, comedians engage in repartee with the audience, responding to their comments and improvising jokes on the spot.
  • During a lighthearted argument, two friends might engage in repartee by trading playful insults and humorous jabs.

25. Retort

A retort is a sharp and clever reply to a comment or question. It is often used to respond to criticism, challenge an argument, or make a witty comeback.

  • For example, if someone says, “You’re always late,” a retort might be, “Better late than ugly.”
  • During a debate, one debater might make a strong point, and the other might retort with a counterargument or a sarcastic remark.
  • In a playful argument, someone might say, “You’re impossible to deal with,” and the other might retort, “That’s why you love me.”

26. Riposte

A riposte is a quick and clever response to an insult or criticism. It is often used in a verbal or written exchange to counter an attack or argument.

  • For example, if someone says, “You’re not very smart,” a riposte could be, “Well, at least I know how to spell ‘intelligence’.”
  • In a friendly banter, one person might say, “You’re just jealous of my amazing fashion sense,” and the riposte could be, “Jealous? More like horrified.”
  • During a debate, one debater might respond to a weak argument with a riposte like, “That’s the best you’ve got? I’ve seen better logic from a toddler.”

27. Zinger

A zinger is a witty and cutting remark that is intended to make a strong impact. It is often used to catch someone off guard or to deliver a clever insult.

  • For instance, if someone makes a mistake and someone else says, “Nice job, Einstein,” that would be considered a zinger.
  • During a roast, a comedian might deliver a zinger like, “Your face could launch a thousand nightmares.”
  • In a playful argument, one person might say, “You’re so slow,” and the zinger could be, “I’m not slow, I’m just pacing myself for the race against mediocrity.”

28. Burn

A burn is a harsh or clever insult that is intended to embarrass or humiliate someone. It is often used to show superiority in a verbal exchange.

  • For example, if someone makes a mistake and someone else says, “Wow, you really know how to screw things up,” that would be considered a burn.
  • During a heated argument, one person might say, “You’re so clueless, you should be a detective in a one-room house.”
  • In a playful banter, one person might say, “You’re so lazy,” and the burn could be, “I’m not lazy, I’m just conserving energy for when I actually need it.”

29. Roast

A roast is a playful and humorous event where friends or colleagues take turns making teasing or mocking comments about each other. It is often done in a lighthearted and friendly manner.

  • For instance, at a birthday party, friends might take turns roasting the birthday person with jokes and funny anecdotes.
  • During a roast, one person might say, “You’re so old, your birth certificate is in Roman numerals.”
  • In a comedy show, a comedian might roast a celebrity by saying, “You’re so famous, even your toaster has a verified Twitter account.”

30. Snappy comeback

A snappy comeback is a quick and clever response to a comment or question. It is often used to demonstrate wit and intelligence in a conversation.

  • For example, if someone says, “You’re not funny,” a snappy comeback could be, “Well, I guess humor is subjective, just like your taste in fashion.”
  • In a friendly banter, one person might say, “You’re so slow,” and the snappy comeback could be, “I’m not slow, I’m just savoring the moment.”
  • During a debate, one debater might respond to a weak argument with a snappy comeback like, “That’s the best you’ve got? I’ve seen better logic from a rock.”

31. Slay

When someone “slays,” they accomplish something with great skill, talent, or style. The term is often used to describe a person’s impressive performance in various areas.

  • For example, “Beyoncé absolutely slayed her performance at the Super Bowl halftime show.”
  • A fan might comment, “That singer’s vocal range is incredible. She slays every note.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m going to slay this job interview and impress the hiring manager.”

32. Shut down

When someone “shuts down” another person, they respond in a way that effectively ends the argument or proves the other person wrong. It can also mean to dismiss or ignore someone.

  • For instance, “The lawyer shut down the opposing counsel with a strong counterargument.”
  • In a debate, one participant might say, “You’re wrong, and I can shut down your argument with these facts.”
  • A person might comment, “I tried to talk to him about it, but he just shut me down and walked away.”

33. Mic drop

When someone “drops the mic,” they make a final statement or perform an action that is so impressive or powerful that it metaphorically leaves the audience in awe. It signifies the end of a conversation or performance.

  • For example, “After delivering an amazing speech, the politician dropped the mic and walked off the stage.”
  • A comedian might say, “I ended my set with a killer joke and a mic drop.”
  • A person might comment, “She shut down her haters with an epic comeback and a mic drop.”

34. Own

When someone “owns” a situation or activity, they have complete control or mastery over it. It can also mean to take responsibility for one’s actions or choices.

  • For instance, “He owns the basketball court and is the star player of the team.”
  • A person might say, “I own my mistakes and learn from them.”
  • Someone might comment, “She owns the dance floor with her incredible moves.”

35. Snap

When someone “snaps,” they provide a quick and witty response to a comment or situation. It can also mean to react strongly or with anger.

  • For example, “She snapped back at the rude comment with a clever retort.”
  • In a playful banter, one person might say, “Oh, snap! You got burned!”
  • A person might comment, “He snapped at his co-worker for constantly interrupting him.”

36. Diss

To disrespect or insult someone in a clever or cutting manner.

  • For example, “He really dissed her with that comment.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t diss me like that, it’s not cool.”
  • In a rap battle, one artist might diss another with clever wordplay and insults.
See also  Top 0 Slang For Gently – Meaning & Usage

37. Throw shade

To indirectly or subtly insult someone or make negative comments about them.

  • For instance, “She’s always throwing shade at her coworkers.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she threw shade at me in front of everyone.”
  • When someone makes a snide comment or gives a backhanded compliment, they are throwing shade.

38. Spit fire

To rap or perform with great intensity, skill, or passion.

  • For example, “He can really spit fire on the mic.”
  • A person might say, “That rapper is known for spitting fire in his verses.”
  • When a rapper delivers fast-paced and clever lyrics with precision and emotion, they are said to be spitting fire.

39. Talk smack

To engage in boastful or insulting speech, especially in a competitive or confrontational context.

  • For instance, “He loves to talk smack before a game.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t pay attention to him, he’s just talking smack.”
  • When someone brags or insults their opponents in a competitive setting, they are talking smack.

40. Drop the hammer

To take decisive action or assert one’s authority in a forceful or final manner.

  • For example, “The boss dropped the hammer and fired the employee.”
  • A person might say, “If he keeps misbehaving, I’m going to drop the hammer.”
  • When someone makes a strong and final decision or takes strict action, they are said to drop the hammer.

41. Hit back

To retaliate or respond in a similar manner to someone’s actions or words. “Hit back” implies that you are fighting back or defending yourself.

  • For example, if someone insults you, you might say, “I’m going to hit back with a clever comeback.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “If you attack me, I’ll hit back even harder.”
  • A person discussing self-defense might advise, “If someone physically attacks you, it’s important to hit back and protect yourself.”

42. Serve

To reply or respond to someone’s comment or insult with a clever or witty comeback. “Serve” implies that you are delivering a response that puts the other person in their place.

  • For instance, if someone insults your outfit, you might respond, “Oh please, I serve looks every day.”
  • In a playful banter, one person might say, “You think you’re funny? Let me serve you a taste of your own medicine.”
  • A comedian might boast, “I’m known for my quick wit and ability to serve hilarious comebacks.”

43. Aight

A slang term used to indicate agreement or acceptance. “Aight” is a shortened form of “alright” and is often used in casual conversations.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re ready to go, you might respond, “Aight, let’s go.”
  • In a group chat, one person might say, “Meeting at 7pm. Everyone aight with that?”
  • A friend might ask, “Wanna grab pizza for dinner?” and you might reply, “Aight, sounds good.”

44. Dope

A slang term used to describe something that is impressive, cool, or excellent. “Dope” is often used to express admiration or excitement.

  • For instance, if someone shows you a new car, you might say, “Wow, that car is dope!”
  • In a conversation about music, one person might say, “Have you heard their new album? It’s so dope.”
  • A friend might show you a piece of artwork and ask for your opinion, to which you might respond, “That’s really dope. I love the colors.”

45. Yeah nah

A phrase used to express uncertainty or ambivalence. “Yeah nah” is often used when someone is hesitant or undecided about a question or statement.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want pizza for dinner, you might respond, “Yeah nah, I’m not really in the mood.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, one person might say, “I heard it’s really good. You should watch it.” and the other person might reply, “Yeah nah, I’m not really into that genre.”
  • A friend might ask if you’re going to the party, and you might respond, “Yeah nah, I have other plans.”

46. Yass

This slang term is often used to show enthusiasm or approval. It is an exaggerated way of saying “yes” or “I agree”.

  • For example, when someone suggests going out for pizza, you might respond, “Yass, let’s do it!”
  • If a friend asks if you want to watch a new movie, you could reply, “Yass, I’ve been wanting to see that!”
  • When someone shares good news, you can show your excitement by saying, “Yass, that’s amazing!”

47. Sure thing

This phrase is used to show that you are willing to do something or agree with what someone is saying.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can help them move, you might reply, “Sure thing, I’ll be there!”
  • If a friend suggests grabbing lunch together, you could respond, “Sure thing, where should we go?”
  • When someone asks if you’re ready to leave, you can simply say, “Sure thing, let’s go!”

48. You got it

This phrase is used to confirm that you will do something or fulfill a request.

  • For example, if someone asks you to pass them a pen, you can respond, “You got it!”
  • If a friend asks if you can pick them up from the airport, you could reply, “You got it, I’ll be there.”
  • When someone asks if you can help them with a project, you can assure them by saying, “You got it, I’ll take care of it!”

49. Absolutely

This word is used to express complete agreement or certainty.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you want to go to a concert, you might reply, “Absolutely, I love that band!”
  • If a friend suggests trying a new restaurant, you could respond, “Absolutely, I’m always up for trying new food!”
  • When someone asks if you agree with their opinion, you can show your full support by saying, “Absolutely, I couldn’t agree more!”

50. I’m down

This slang phrase is used to show that you are interested or willing to participate in something.

  • For example, if someone suggests going hiking, you might respond, “I’m down, that sounds fun!”
  • If a friend asks if you want to join them for a movie, you could reply, “I’m down, what time?”
  • When someone proposes a spontaneous road trip, you can express your enthusiasm by saying, “I’m down, let’s hit the road!”

51. Sounds good

This phrase is used to express agreement or approval with a suggestion or statement.

  • For example, if someone suggests going out for dinner, you might respond, “Sounds good!”
  • When making plans with a friend, you could say, “Let’s meet at the park at 3 pm.” They might reply, “Sounds good to me.”
  • If someone asks if you’re okay with a certain arrangement, you can say, “Sounds good, let’s do it.”

52. All good

This phrase is used to indicate that everything is fine or acceptable.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you need any help, you can respond, “No, I’m all good.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, you might say, “Don’t worry, it’s all good.”
  • When confirming plans, you could say, “I’ll be there on time, so everything is all good.”

53. Fair enough

This phrase is used to indicate that you accept or acknowledge a point or opinion made by someone else.

  • For example, if someone disagrees with your viewpoint and presents a valid argument, you might respond, “Fair enough, I see your point.”
  • If someone suggests a compromise during a negotiation, you can say, “Fair enough, let’s meet in the middle.”
  • When discussing different options, you could say, “I prefer option A, but if you want to go with option B, fair enough.”

54. No problemo

This phrase is a playful and informal way of saying “no problem” or “no issue.”

  • For instance, if someone asks you for a favor, you can respond, “No problemo, I’ll help you out.”
  • If someone thanks you for something, you might say, “No problemo, happy to help.”
  • When someone apologizes for a mistake, you could say, “No problemo, everyone makes mistakes.”

55. You bet

This phrase is a casual way of expressing affirmative response or agreement.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to join them for a movie, you can respond, “You bet!”
  • When someone thanks you for something, you might say, “You bet, anytime.”
  • If someone asks if you’re sure about a decision, you could say, “You bet, I’ve thought it through.”

56. No doubt

This phrase is used to express agreement or confirmation. It is often used to indicate that there is no uncertainty or hesitation in the response.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?” a person might respond, “No doubt!”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might say, “We’ll meet at the usual spot, no doubt.”
  • When someone expresses gratitude, a response could be, “No doubt, happy to help!”

57. Affirmative

This word is used to indicate agreement or confirmation. It is a formal way of saying “yes” and is often used in professional or official settings.

  • For instance, in a military context, a superior might ask, “Do you understand?” and the response would be “Affirmative.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We received your proposal. Can we move forward with it?” and the response could be, “Affirmative.”
  • When confirming a reservation over the phone, a customer might say, “Affirmative, I will be there on that date.”

58. Yup

This word is a casual and informal way of saying “yes.” It is often used in everyday conversations among friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner tonight?” a response could be, “Yup!”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “I’m on my way. Will you be home?” and the response could be, “Yup, see you soon!”
  • When confirming a simple question, like “Is it raining outside?”, a person might respond with a quick “Yup.”

59. Nah

This word is a casual and informal way of saying “no.” It is often used in everyday conversations among friends or acquaintances.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the movies?” a response could be, “Nah, not tonight.”
  • In a discussion about trying a new restaurant, someone might say, “Have you been there before?” and the response could be, “Nah, I haven’t.”
  • When declining an invitation, a person might say, “Thanks for the offer, but nah, I’m not interested.”

60. Yeah yeah

This phrase is used to express agreement or confirmation in a more enthusiastic or emphatic way. It is often used to show enthusiasm or excitement in the response.

  • For example, if someone says, “That concert was amazing!” a response could be, “Yeah yeah, it was incredible!”
  • In a discussion about a favorite sports team, someone might say, “They’re going to win the championship!” and the response could be, “Yeah yeah, they’ve got a strong team.”
  • When showing support for a friend’s idea, a person might say, “Yeah yeah, that’s a great plan!”

61. I got you

This phrase is often used to acknowledge that you understand what someone is saying or that you will handle a task or request. It can also be used to show support or agreement.

  • For example, if someone asks for a favor, you might respond, “I got you, no problem.”
  • If someone explains a complex concept to you, you might say, “Okay, I got you now.”
  • In a conversation about plans, you might say, “I got you, let’s meet at the usual spot.”

62. Say no more

This phrase is used to indicate that you understand someone’s message or request without needing any additional explanation.

  • For instance, if someone says they’re tired and need to go home, you might respond, “Say no more, I’ll drive you.”
  • If someone mentions they’re craving pizza, you might say, “Say no more, I’ll order it.”
  • In a conversation about a shared interest, you might say, “Say no more, I’m a huge fan too.”

63. Touché

This term is used to acknowledge a good point made by someone else or to respond to a clever comeback in a lighthearted way.

  • For example, if someone makes a witty comment about your outfit, you might respond, “Touché, you got me there.”
  • In a friendly debate, if someone presents a strong argument, you might say, “Touché, I hadn’t considered that.”
  • If someone responds to your joke with a funny remark, you might say, “Touché, you win this round.”

This phrase is used to express agreement or to indicate that something is correct or accurate.

  • For instance, if someone suggests going to a party, you might respond, “Right on, I’m in.”
  • If someone states a fact that you agree with, you might say, “Right on, that’s exactly right.”
  • In a conversation about a shared opinion, you might say, “Right on, I feel the same way.”

65. Totally

This word is used to express complete agreement, understanding, or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re ready to leave, you might respond, “Totally, let’s go.”
  • If someone explains a concept and you understand it completely, you might say, “Totally, I get it now.”
  • In a conversation about a shared experience, you might say, “Totally, I had the same reaction.”

66. 10-4

This phrase is used to acknowledge that you have received and understood a message or instruction. It originated from the ten-code system used by law enforcement and emergency services.

  • For example, if someone tells you to meet them at a specific location, you might respond with “10-4, I’ll be there.”
  • In a radio conversation, a person might say, “10-4, I copy that information.”
  • When someone asks if you understand their explanation, you can reply with “10-4, I got it.”

67. Got it

This phrase is a simple and informal way to indicate that you have comprehended or grasped something that has been said or explained to you.

  • For instance, if someone gives you directions to a place, you can respond with “Got it, thanks!”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might ask, “Does everyone understand the assignment?” and students can reply with “Got it.”
  • When someone provides you with important information, you can acknowledge by saying “Got it, I’ll remember.”