Top 49 Slang For Rest – Meaning & Usage

Feeling burnt out and in need of a break? Look no further! Our team has put together a list of the top slang for rest that will have you relaxing in no time. From chillaxing to taking a catnap, we’ve got you covered with all the trendy terms to help you unwind and recharge. So kick back, relax, and get ready to upgrade your rest game with our ultimate listicle!

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1. Chillax

A combination of “chill” and “relax,” this slang term means to take it easy and unwind. It implies a laid-back and stress-free attitude towards resting.

  • For example, after a long day at work, someone might say, “I just want to chillax on the couch and watch some TV.”
  • If a friend seems stressed, you might suggest, “Why don’t you take a break and chillax for a bit?”
  • When making plans for the weekend, you might say, “Let’s just chillax and enjoy some downtime.”

2. Catch some Z’s

This slang term refers to getting some rest or sleep. The “Z’s” represent the sound of snoring, indicating a deep and peaceful sleep.

  • For instance, if someone looks tired, you might say, “You should go home and catch some Z’s.”
  • When discussing the importance of sleep, someone might say, “It’s crucial to catch some Z’s to recharge your body and mind.”
  • If a friend complains about feeling exhausted, you might advise, “Take a nap and catch some Z’s to feel refreshed.”

3. Take a breather

This phrase means to take a short break or pause from an activity to rest and relax. It suggests taking a moment to catch your breath and recharge.

  • For example, during a workout, a trainer might say, “Let’s take a breather and hydrate before the next set.”
  • If a coworker seems overwhelmed, you might suggest, “Why don’t you step outside and take a breather?”
  • When discussing the benefits of breaks, someone might say, “Taking a breather can help you regain focus and reduce stress.”

4. Hit the hay

This slang term means to go to sleep or to go to bed. It refers to the act of hitting or laying on a bed made of hay, which was common in the past.

  • For instance, if someone mentions feeling tired, you might say, “It’s late, you should hit the hay.”
  • When discussing bedtime routines, someone might say, “I usually hit the hay around 10 PM.”
  • If a friend complains about insomnia, you might suggest, “Try establishing a bedtime routine to help you hit the hay easier.”

5. Crash out

This slang term means to fall asleep quickly and deeply, often implying exhaustion or a need for rest. It suggests collapsing into a state of sleep.

  • For example, after a long day of hiking, someone might say, “I’m so tired, I’m going to crash out as soon as I hit the bed.”
  • When discussing the effects of jet lag, someone might say, “I always crash out early the first night after a long flight.”
  • If a friend mentions feeling drained, you might suggest, “Why don’t you go home and crash out for a while?”

6. Power nap

A short nap, usually lasting around 15-30 minutes, that is intended to provide a quick burst of energy and improve alertness. Power naps are often taken during the day to combat fatigue and increase productivity.

  • For example, “I’m feeling tired after lunch, I think I’ll take a power nap to recharge.”
  • A student might say, “I always take a power nap before studying for exams.”
  • Someone might suggest, “If you’re feeling tired at work, try taking a power nap during your lunch break.”

7. Decompress

To decompress means to relax and unwind after a period of stress or tension. It involves taking time for oneself to release built-up pressure and find a sense of calm.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I like to decompress by taking a hot bath.”
  • A person might say, “I need to decompress and clear my mind before making any decisions.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Go for a walk in nature to decompress and connect with yourself.”

8. Zone out

To zone out means to mentally disconnect or lose focus on one’s surroundings or current situation. It often involves daydreaming or becoming absorbed in one’s thoughts.

  • For example, “I tend to zone out when I’m listening to music.”
  • A person might say, “I was so tired in class that I started to zone out.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you okay? You’ve been zoning out for the past few minutes.”

9. Unplug

To unplug means to intentionally disconnect from technology, such as phones, computers, and other electronic devices. It is a way to take a break from the constant digital stimulation and focus on being present in the real world.

  • For instance, “I’m going on a vacation to unplug and enjoy nature.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to unplug for an hour every day to reduce screen time.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Instead of checking social media, try unplugging and reading a book.”

10. Snooze

To snooze means to have a short sleep, often in the morning after an alarm has gone off. It is a way to get a few extra minutes of rest before starting the day.

  • For example, “I always hit the snooze button at least once before getting out of bed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not a morning person, so I rely on snoozing to ease into the day.”
  • Someone might suggest, “If you’re feeling tired in the morning, try setting your alarm a bit earlier and allowing yourself a snooze.”

11. Kick back

To kick back means to relax and take it easy. It refers to taking a break from work or responsibilities and simply enjoying leisure time.

  • For example, after a long day at work, you might say, “I can’t wait to go home and kick back on the couch.”
  • On a weekend, someone might suggest, “Let’s kick back and watch some movies.”
  • When discussing vacation plans, a person might say, “I just want to find a beach and kick back for a few days.”

12. Cat nap

A cat nap is a short and light sleep. It refers to a brief period of rest, usually during the day, where one takes a quick nap to recharge.

  • For instance, during a break at work, someone might say, “I’m going to take a cat nap in my car.”
  • If feeling tired in the afternoon, a person might say, “I just need a quick cat nap to get through the rest of the day.”
  • When discussing productivity, someone might suggest, “Try taking a cat nap to boost your energy levels.”

13. Lounge around

To lounge around means to spend time lazily or idly. It refers to relaxing and doing nothing in particular, often in a comfortable and leisurely manner.

  • For example, on a lazy Sunday, someone might say, “I’m just going to lounge around the house all day.”
  • When discussing vacation plans, a person might suggest, “Let’s find a beach resort where we can lounge around by the pool.”
  • If feeling tired and unmotivated, someone might say, “I don’t feel like doing anything today, I just want to lounge around.”

14. Recharge

To recharge means to refuel energy and regain strength. It refers to taking a break or rest in order to replenish one’s energy levels and feel refreshed.

  • For instance, after a busy week, someone might say, “I need the weekend to recharge and prepare for the next week.”
  • When discussing self-care, a person might suggest, “Take some time each day to recharge and take care of yourself.”
  • If feeling mentally drained, someone might say, “I’m going to take a day off to recharge and clear my mind.”

15. Veg out

To veg out means to relax and do nothing. It refers to spending time in a state of relaxation, often by engaging in activities that require minimal effort or mental stimulation.

  • For example, after a long day, someone might say, “I’m just going to veg out on the couch and watch some TV.”
  • When discussing weekend plans, a person might suggest, “Let’s veg out and play video games all day.”
  • If feeling exhausted and in need of a break, someone might say, “I’m going to veg out this weekend and not worry about anything.”

16. Take five

This phrase is used to suggest taking a quick break or pause from an activity. It is often used in a work or performance setting.

  • For example, a director might say to the actors, “Let’s take five and then resume from the top of the scene.”
  • In a busy office, a coworker might say, “I need to take five and grab a coffee before the meeting.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Take five and hydrate before we continue with practice.”

17. Rest up

This phrase is used to encourage someone to get some rest in order to recover and recharge.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “You’ve been working hard all week. Rest up this weekend.”
  • After a long day of physical activity, someone might say, “I’m going to rest up and let my muscles recover.”
  • A doctor might advise a patient, “Make sure to rest up and get plenty of sleep to help your body heal.”

18. Sleep like a log

This phrase is used to describe a deep and uninterrupted sleep, where someone is completely unaware of their surroundings.

  • For example, after a good night’s sleep, someone might say, “I slept like a log and woke up feeling refreshed.”
  • When discussing sleep quality, a person might say, “I envy those who can sleep like a log.”
  • A parent might say about their child, “Once they’re asleep, they sleep like a log through the night.”

19. Hit the sack

This phrase is used to casually express the action of going to bed or going to sleep.

  • For instance, after a long day, someone might say, “I’m exhausted, I’m going to hit the sack.”
  • When discussing bedtime routines, a person might say, “I like to hit the sack early and wake up refreshed.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you ready to hit the sack or do you want to watch another episode?”

20. Doze off

This phrase is used to describe the act of unintentionally falling asleep, often for a short period of time.

  • For example, someone might say, “I was so tired during the movie that I dozed off for a few minutes.”
  • When discussing the effects of medication, a person might say, “This medicine makes me doze off easily.”
  • A student might confess, “I always doze off during long lectures.”

21. Lay low

This phrase means to keep a low profile or avoid drawing attention to oneself. It can also imply hiding or taking a break from a particular activity or situation.

  • For example, if someone is trying to avoid trouble, they might say, “I need to lay low for a while until things calm down.”
  • In a discussion about avoiding conflict, someone might suggest, “If you want to stay safe, it’s best to lay low and not get involved.”
  • A person who is tired or needs a break might say, “I’m going to lay low this weekend and just relax at home.”

22. Chill

To “chill” means to relax or take a break from activities. It can also refer to maintaining a calm and laid-back attitude.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What are you doing tonight?” a response might be, “Just chilling at home and watching movies.”
  • In a conversation about stress relief, someone might suggest, “When life gets overwhelming, it’s important to take some time to chill and unwind.”
  • A person who is feeling relaxed and content might say, “I’m just chilling and enjoying the peaceful moment.”

23. Crash

To “crash” means to sleep or take a nap, often after a period of being awake or active. It can also refer to falling asleep suddenly or unexpectedly.

  • For example, if someone is feeling tired, they might say, “I need to crash for a few hours before I can do anything else.”
  • In a discussion about sleep patterns, someone might comment, “I always crash as soon as I get home from work.”
  • A person who is feeling exhausted might say, “I can’t wait to crash in my bed and get a good night’s sleep.”

24. Unwind

To “unwind” means to relax and let go of stress or tension. It can also refer to engaging in activities that help one relax and recharge.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “How do you unwind after a long day?” a response might be, “I like to unwind by taking a hot bath and reading a book.”
  • In a conversation about self-care, someone might suggest, “It’s important to set aside time each day to unwind and take care of yourself.”
  • A person who is feeling overwhelmed might say, “I need to find a way to unwind and destress before I burn out.”

25. Lounge

To “lounge” means to relax and spend leisure time in a comfortable and relaxed manner. It can also refer to hanging out or socializing in a casual setting.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What are your plans for the weekend?” a response might be, “I just want to lounge by the pool and soak up the sun.”
  • In a discussion about weekend activities, someone might suggest, “Let’s find a cozy cafe where we can lounge and chat.”
  • A person who enjoys downtime might say, “I love to lounge around in my pajamas and watch movies on lazy Sundays.”

26. Shut eye

This slang term refers to getting some sleep or taking a nap. It is often used to indicate the need for rest or relaxation.

  • For example, “I’m so tired, I need to catch some shut eye.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t get much shut eye last night, so I’ll be taking a nap later.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of rest, someone might mention, “Getting enough shut eye is crucial for overall health and well-being.”

27. Slumber

This term is a more formal way of referring to sleep. It often conveys a sense of peacefulness and tranquility.

  • For instance, “I’m going to slumber for a few hours and recharge.”
  • A person might say, “I had a restful slumber last night and woke up feeling refreshed.”
  • In a conversation about different sleep patterns, someone might mention, “Some people naturally require less slumber than others.”

28. Power down

This slang term is often used to describe the act of taking a break or getting some rest. It implies the need to recharge and rejuvenate.

  • For example, “I’m going to power down for a bit and relax.”
  • A person might say, “After a long day at work, I need to power down and unwind.”
  • In a discussion about self-care, someone might mention, “Taking time to power down is essential for maintaining mental and physical well-being.”

29. Kick your feet up

This phrase is a colloquial way of suggesting that someone should take a break and relax. It conveys a sense of leisure and comfort.

  • For instance, “After a long day, it’s time to kick my feet up and unwind.”
  • A person might say, “I love coming home and kicking my feet up on the couch.”
  • In a conversation about stress management, someone might suggest, “When things get overwhelming, take a moment to kick your feet up and breathe.”

30. Take a load off

This slang term is used to suggest that someone should take a break and relieve themselves of a burden or responsibility. It implies the need for rest and relaxation.

  • For example, “Sit down and take a load off, you’ve been working hard.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to take a load off and enjoy some downtime.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might mention, “It’s important to take a load off and prioritize self-care.”

31. Be still

This phrase is used to tell someone to calm down or relax.

  • For example, if someone is feeling stressed, you might say, “Just be still and take a deep breath.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might say, “Everyone needs to be still and think before reacting.”
  • If someone is feeling anxious, you might suggest, “Take a moment to be still and clear your mind.”

32. Put your feet up

This phrase means to sit down and relax, often by putting your feet on a raised surface.

  • For instance, after a long day of work, you might say, “I’m going to put my feet up and watch some TV.”
  • If someone is feeling tired, you might suggest, “Why don’t you put your feet up and rest for a while?”
  • When someone is feeling overwhelmed, you might advise, “Take a moment to put your feet up and recharge.”

33. Take a siesta

This phrase refers to the practice of taking a short nap or rest in the afternoon, especially in Spanish-speaking cultures.

  • For example, if someone is feeling tired after lunch, you might say, “Why don’t you take a siesta to re-energize?”
  • When discussing different cultural traditions, you might mention, “In Spain, it’s common to take a siesta during the hottest hours of the day.”
  • If someone is feeling exhausted, you might suggest, “Try taking a short siesta to help you feel more refreshed.”

34. Crash and burn

This phrase is used to describe a situation where something goes horribly wrong or fails spectacularly.

  • For instance, if a business venture fails, you might say, “Their new startup crashed and burned.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “The team started strong, but then they crashed and burned in the second half.”
  • If someone’s plans fall apart, you might comment, “Looks like their grand scheme crashed and burned.”

35. Nod off

This phrase means to fall asleep, often for a short period of time or unintentionally.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to stay awake, you might say, “Don’t nod off, we’re almost there.”
  • When discussing the effects of fatigue, you might mention, “I kept nodding off during the boring lecture.”
  • If someone is feeling drowsy, you might advise, “Take a short power nap so you don’t keep nodding off.”

36. Hit the pillow

This phrase means to go to sleep or lay down to rest. It emphasizes the action of physically hitting the pillow as a way to indicate the start of sleep.

  • For example, “I had a long day at work, I can’t wait to hit the pillow tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I’m exhausted, I’m going to hit the pillow early tonight.”
  • Another might mention, “After a busy weekend, all I want to do is hit the pillow and relax.”

37. Snuggle up

This phrase refers to getting into a comfortable position, usually under covers or with a blanket, in order to relax or sleep. It implies finding warmth and comfort in the act of snuggling.

  • For instance, “It’s cold outside, let’s snuggle up on the couch and watch a movie.”
  • A person might say, “I love snuggling up in bed with a good book.”
  • Another might mention, “After a long day, I like to snuggle up with my favorite blanket and unwind.”

38. Doze

This word means to sleep lightly or for a short period of time. It suggests a state of relaxation or restfulness, without fully entering into a deep sleep.

  • For example, “I’ll just doze for a few minutes to recharge.”
  • A person might say, “I often doze off during long car rides.”
  • Another might mention, “After lunch, I like to find a quiet spot to doze for a little while.”

39. Sleep tight

This phrase is a way to wish someone a good night’s sleep. It expresses the hope that the person will sleep comfortably and peacefully.

  • For instance, “Goodnight, sleep tight!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Sweet dreams, sleep tight.”
  • Another might mention, “After a tiring day, all I want to do is crawl into bed and sleep tight.”

40. Hit the pit

This phrase is a slang term for going to bed or going to sleep. It conveys the idea of hitting or entering a pit, which represents a place of rest or sleep.

  • For example, “I’m exhausted, I’m going to hit the pit early tonight.”
  • A person might say, “After a long day of hiking, I can’t wait to hit the pit.”
  • Another might mention, “I always hit the pit right after finishing my night shift.”

41. Take a catnap

This phrase refers to taking a brief, light sleep during the day. It is often used to describe a quick rest to rejuvenate and recharge.

  • For example, “I’m feeling so tired, I think I’ll take a catnap before dinner.”
  • During a long road trip, someone might say, “Let’s pull over and take a catnap to stay alert.”
  • A student preparing for an exam might say, “I’ll study for a bit and then take a catnap to refresh my mind.”

42. Rest your eyes

This slang phrase suggests taking a break and giving your eyes a rest by closing them. It is often used to indicate a short period of relaxation or a moment to relieve eye strain.

  • For instance, “I’ve been staring at the computer screen all day. I need to rest my eyes for a few minutes.”
  • After reading for a while, someone might say, “I’m going to rest my eyes for a bit before continuing.”
  • A person feeling tired might say, “I’ll just rest my eyes for a moment before getting back to work.”

43. Grab some shut-eye

This phrase means to take a short nap or get some sleep. It is often used to convey the idea of quickly catching some rest, especially when feeling tired or exhausted.

  • For example, “I only have a few minutes, but I’ll try to grab some shut-eye before my next meeting.”
  • After a long day of work, someone might say, “I’m going to grab some shut-eye and recharge for tomorrow.”
  • During a long flight, a traveler might say, “I’ll try to grab some shut-eye on the plane to minimize jet lag.”

44. Snooze fest

This slang term describes a period of rest or sleep that is uninteresting or dull. It is often used humorously to convey a lack of excitement or entertainment.

  • For instance, “I stayed in all day and had a snooze fest. Nothing exciting happened.”
  • Someone might describe a boring weekend as, “It was a total snooze fest. I didn’t do anything.”
  • After a lackluster party, a person might say, “That gathering was a snooze fest. I wish there was more to do.”

45. Take a power nap

This phrase refers to taking a brief nap, typically lasting around 20 minutes, with the intention of recharging and boosting energy levels. It is often used to describe a quick rest that leaves a person feeling refreshed.

  • For example, “I have a busy day ahead, so I’ll take a power nap to stay alert.”
  • During a break at work, someone might say, “I’ll take a power nap to recharge before tackling the rest of my tasks.”
  • A student preparing for an exam might say, “I always take a power nap before a big test to improve my focus.”

46. Rack out

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is going to sleep or taking a nap, especially in a military or informal setting.

  • For example, “I’m exhausted, I’m going to rack out for a few hours.”
  • A soldier might say, “After a long day of training, all I want to do is rack out.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you going to rack out early tonight?”

47. Be out like a light

This expression is used to describe someone who falls asleep very quickly and deeply, often without any disturbances.

  • For instance, “I was so tired that as soon as my head hit the pillow, I was out like a light.”
  • A person might say, “After a long day at work, I’ll be out like a light as soon as I get home.”
  • Someone might comment, “Whenever I take a hot bath before bed, I’m out like a light.”

48. Clock out

This phrase is commonly used to describe the action of ending one’s work shift or stopping work for the day.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to clock out and go home.”
  • An employee might say, “I always make sure to clock out on time.”
  • Someone might ask, “What time do you usually clock out?”

49. Be in dreamland

This expression is used to describe someone who is in a deep sleep or lost in their dreams.

  • For instance, “After a long day, I can’t wait to be in dreamland.”
  • A person might say, “I was so tired that as soon as I lay down, I was in dreamland.”
  • Someone might comment, “When I’m in dreamland, I have the most vivid dreams.”
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