Top 50 Slang For Reviewal – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying up-to-date with the ever-evolving world of slang, we’ve got you covered. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to sound more in-the-know, our team has curated a list of the hottest slang terms for reviewal. Get ready to level up your vocabulary and impress your friends with these trendy and must-know expressions. Let’s dive in and explore the colorful world of modern language together!

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1. Recap

A brief summary or overview of something, often used to review or refresh one’s memory. “Recap” is commonly used in informal or casual settings.

  • For example, after a meeting, someone might say, “Can you give me a quick recap of what we discussed?”
  • In a TV show review, a writer might provide a recap of the previous episode to catch up viewers.
  • A sports commentator might say, “Let’s recap the key plays from the game.”

2. Audit

A thorough examination or review of financial records, procedures, or systems to ensure accuracy, compliance, or efficiency. “Audit” is commonly used in a business or financial context.

  • For instance, a company might hire an external auditor to conduct an audit of their financial statements.
  • An accountant might say, “I need to audit these expense reports to check for any discrepancies.”
  • In a conversation about tax returns, someone might mention, “I’m getting audited by the IRS.”

3. Evaluation

The act of assessing or judging the value, quality, or performance of something. “Evaluation” is a general term that can be used in various contexts, such as academic, professional, or personal.

  • For example, a teacher might evaluate students’ essays based on specific criteria.
  • In a performance review, a manager might evaluate an employee’s work performance and provide feedback.
  • A product reviewer might say, “Here’s my evaluation of the latest smartphone on the market.”

4. Assessment

The process of evaluating or judging the nature, quality, or significance of something. “Assessment” is a broad term that can be used in different contexts, such as educational, medical, or psychological.

  • For instance, a doctor might conduct a health assessment to evaluate a patient’s overall well-being.
  • In a classroom, a teacher might give an assessment to measure students’ understanding of a topic.
  • A financial advisor might provide an assessment of an individual’s investment portfolio.

5. Critique

A detailed analysis or evaluation of something, often focusing on its strengths, weaknesses, and overall quality. “Critique” is commonly used in art, literature, or cultural contexts.

  • For example, an art critic might write a critique of an exhibition, discussing the artist’s techniques and the impact of the artwork.
  • In a book club, members might take turns giving a critique of the selected novel.
  • A film reviewer might say, “Here’s my critique of the latest blockbuster movie.”

6. Inspection

The act of carefully examining or evaluating something, often to assess its condition or quality. “Inspection” is commonly used in a variety of contexts, such as checking a building for safety compliance or examining a vehicle for mechanical issues.

  • For example, a mechanic might say, “I need to perform an inspection of your car to determine the source of the problem.”
  • In a workplace, a supervisor might request, “We need to schedule an inspection of the office to ensure it meets the required standards.”
  • A homebuyer might ask, “Can I hire a professional for a thorough inspection of the property before making an offer?”

7. Appraisal

The act of assessing the value, quality, or worth of something. “Appraisal” is often used in the context of determining the monetary value of property or possessions, but it can also refer to the assessment of performance, skills, or potential.

  • For instance, a real estate agent might say, “I will conduct an appraisal of your house to determine its market value.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might provide feedback by saying, “Here is my appraisal of your work over the past year.”
  • A collector might seek an expert’s appraisal of a rare item to determine its authenticity and worth.

8. Feedback

Information or opinions provided to someone about their performance, work, or behavior, often with the intention of helping them improve or make adjustments. “Feedback” can be both positive and negative and is essential for growth and development.

  • For example, a teacher might give feedback to a student by saying, “You did a great job on this assignment. Your analysis was thorough and insightful.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might request feedback by asking, “Can you give me some feedback on my presentation? I want to improve for next time.”
  • A customer might provide feedback to a company by writing a review, stating, “I had a great experience with this product. It exceeded my expectations.”

9. Analysis

The process of studying or examining something in detail to understand its components, structure, or nature. “Analysis” often involves breaking down complex information or data into smaller parts to gain insights or draw conclusions.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “I conducted an analysis of the data and found a significant correlation between the variables.”
  • In a business context, a manager might perform a cost-benefit analysis to determine the feasibility of a project.
  • A sports commentator might provide analysis of a player’s performance by saying, “Let’s take a closer look at the player’s technique and decision-making during the game.”

10. Revision

The act of making changes or modifications to something, often with the goal of improving it or correcting errors. “Revision” is commonly used in the context of editing written documents, but it can also refer to making adjustments to various other forms of work or creative projects.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to do a revision of my manuscript before submitting it to the publisher.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might ask students to revise their essays based on feedback received.
  • A designer might make revisions to a logo based on client preferences and suggestions.

11. Examination

This refers to a formal assessment of knowledge or skills. It is often used in an educational or professional context.

  • For example, a student might say, “I have an important examination tomorrow.”
  • A teacher might announce, “The final examination will cover all the material we’ve learned this semester.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might be asked, “Have you ever taken a professional examination?”

12. Scrutiny

This term refers to a careful and thorough examination or observation of something. It implies a detailed analysis or evaluation.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need to subject the evidence to closer scrutiny.”
  • A journalist might write, “The politician’s actions are under scrutiny by the public.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might explain, “The data was analyzed with meticulous scrutiny.”

13. Check-up

This slang term refers to a routine or regular medical examination to assess one’s health or progress.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “It’s time for your annual check-up.”
  • A person discussing their health might mention, “I go for regular check-ups to make sure everything is okay.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Have you had your check-up at the dentist yet?”

14. Overview

This term refers to a general or brief description of something, providing an outline or summary.

  • For instance, a presenter might give an overview of a project before diving into the details.
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s start with a quick overview of the agenda.”
  • A tour guide might provide an overview of the city’s history to the group.
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15. Verdict

This slang term refers to a final decision or judgment made after careful consideration or evaluation.

  • For example, a judge might announce, “The jury has reached a verdict.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Let the audience decide the verdict.”
  • A person discussing a movie might declare, “In my opinion, the verdict is that it’s a must-watch.”

16. Report

A report is a written or spoken account of something that has been observed, investigated, or researched. It often provides information or analysis on a specific topic or issue.

  • For example, a journalist might write, “I filed a report on the recent political rally.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “I need a report on the sales figures for the last quarter.”
  • A student might ask, “Can you help me write my book report?”

17. Survey

A survey is a method of gathering information or opinions from a group of people. It typically involves asking a series of questions to collect data or gain insights on a particular topic.

  • For instance, a company might conduct a customer satisfaction survey to understand how their products are perceived.
  • A researcher might design a survey to gather data for a study on social media usage.
  • In a political context, a survey might be conducted to gauge public opinion on a specific issue.

18. Rundown

A rundown is a concise summary or overview of something. It provides a brief and condensed version of the main points or details.

  • For example, a news anchor might give a rundown of the day’s top stories.
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s start with a rundown of the agenda for today.”
  • A sports commentator might provide a rundown of the key plays in a game.

19. Review

A review is an evaluation or critique of something, such as a product, service, or performance. It often involves analyzing the strengths, weaknesses, and overall quality.

  • For instance, a movie critic might write a review of a newly released film.
  • A customer might leave a review on an online shopping website to share their experience with a product.
  • In an academic setting, a teacher might ask students to write a book review.

20. Criticism

Criticism refers to the act of analyzing, evaluating, and providing feedback on something, often with a focus on identifying areas for improvement.

  • For example, an art teacher might offer constructive criticism on a student’s artwork.
  • A manager might provide criticism to an employee to help them develop their skills.
  • In a debate, someone might offer criticism of an opposing argument.

21. Breakdown

This term refers to the process of examining something in detail and breaking it down into its individual components or elements. It can also refer to a summary or explanation of something.

  • For example, in a sports analysis, a commentator might say, “Let’s break down the key plays from the game.”
  • In a business meeting, a presenter might provide a breakdown of the company’s financial performance.
  • When discussing a complex issue, someone might ask, “Can you give me a breakdown of the different factors involved?”

22. Study

To study means to engage in a focused and intentional effort to learn or understand something. It often involves reading, researching, and reviewing relevant materials.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to study for my upcoming exam.”
  • A person preparing for a job interview might study the company’s website and research common interview questions.
  • When learning a new skill, someone might study instructional videos or take a course.

23. Recapitulation

This term refers to the act of summarizing or reviewing the main points or events of something. It can also refer to a restatement or reiteration of something.

  • For example, at the end of a presentation, a speaker might provide a recapitulation of the key takeaways.
  • In a music performance, a recapitulation is a section where earlier themes or melodies are restated.
  • When discussing a book or movie, someone might give a recapitulation of the plot to refresh others’ memories.

24. Reassessment

Reassessment refers to the act of reevaluating or reconsidering something, often in light of new information or changed circumstances.

  • For instance, a company might reassess its marketing strategy after poor sales results.
  • A person might reassess their career goals after receiving feedback from a mentor.
  • When making a decision, someone might reassess their options before finalizing their choice.

25. Reexamination

Reexamination is the act of examining or reviewing something again, often with a fresh perspective or in more detail.

  • For example, a doctor might order a reexamination of a patient’s test results to confirm a diagnosis.
  • In a legal context, a reexamination might involve questioning a witness again to clarify their testimony.
  • When analyzing data, a scientist might reexamine the results to ensure accuracy.

26. Check-in

This term refers to the act of providing an update or reporting on progress. It is commonly used in professional settings to keep supervisors or team members informed.

  • For example, in a team meeting, a member might say, “I just wanted to check-in and let everyone know that I’ve completed my tasks for the week.”
  • During a project review, a manager might ask, “Can you check-in with me tomorrow and give me an update on the status?”
  • A colleague might send an email saying, “Just a quick check-in to see how things are going with the client.”

27. Check out

This phrase is used to describe the act of examining or inspecting something. It can refer to physically inspecting an object or reviewing information or details.

  • For instance, when shopping for a new car, a person might say, “I’m going to check out a few dealerships this weekend.”
  • When researching a topic, someone might comment, “I checked out several books from the library to gather information.”
  • In a professional context, a supervisor might ask, “Can you check out this report and make sure all the numbers are accurate?”

28. Go over

This phrase is used to describe the act of reviewing or discussing something in detail. It implies a thorough examination or analysis.

  • For example, before a presentation, a team might say, “Let’s go over the slides one more time to make sure everything is clear.”
  • During a training session, an instructor might ask, “Shall we go over the steps again to ensure everyone understands?”
  • In a meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s go over the budget for next quarter and see if any adjustments need to be made.”

29. Look into

This phrase is used to describe the act of investigating or researching a specific topic. It implies a deeper examination or analysis.

  • For instance, if a company is experiencing a decline in sales, a manager might say, “We need to look into the reasons behind this drop.”
  • When planning a vacation, someone might comment, “I’m looking into different destinations and comparing prices.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “We will look into the matter and gather evidence to support our case.”

30. Scrutinize

This term refers to the act of examining or analyzing something closely and critically. It implies a thorough and detailed inspection.

  • For example, when reviewing a document, a supervisor might say, “I need to scrutinize every detail to ensure accuracy.”
  • During an audit, an auditor might comment, “We will scrutinize the financial records to identify any discrepancies.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might say, “We need to scrutinize the data to determine if there are any outliers or errors.”

31. Assess

To evaluate or determine the nature, quality, or importance of something. “Size up” is a slang term often used to refer to the act of assessing a situation or person.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I need to size up the crime scene before making any conclusions.”
  • In a job interview, a hiring manager might ask, “How do you size up a candidate’s qualifications?”
  • A sports commentator might comment, “The coach needs to size up the opposing team’s strengths and weaknesses.”

32. Analyze

To examine something in detail, typically for the purpose of understanding its components or structure. “Break down” is a colloquial term often used to refer to the process of analyzing something.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “We need to break down the data to identify any patterns.”
  • In a film review, a critic might comment, “Let’s break down the plot and character development.”
  • A teacher might instruct students, “Break down the poem into its different literary devices.”

33. Examine

To inspect or scrutinize something closely in order to understand or evaluate it. “Look into” is a slang term often used to refer to the act of examining something.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I need to look into your symptoms further to make a diagnosis.”
  • In a police investigation, an officer might say, “We need to look into the suspect’s alibi.”
  • A journalist might report, “The committee will look into allegations of corruption.”

34. Inspect

To examine or scrutinize something carefully in order to assess its condition, quality, or worth. “Check out” is a colloquial term often used to refer to the act of inspecting something.

  • For instance, a mechanic might say, “Let me check out the engine to see what’s wrong.”
  • In a real estate transaction, a buyer might say, “I want to check out the property before making an offer.”
  • A teacher might ask, “Did you check out the new library books?”

35. Evaluate

To assess or judge the value, significance, or quality of something. “Size up” is a slang term often used to refer to the act of evaluating something.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to size up the performance of our employees.”
  • In a sports competition, a coach might comment, “We’ll evaluate the team’s performance after the game.”
  • A teacher might assess a student’s essay and say, “Let’s size up the strengths and weaknesses of this paper.”

36. Appraise

To assess or determine the value, quality, or importance of something. “Appraise” is often used when reviewing or assessing the worth or condition of an object or situation.

  • For example, a real estate agent might say, “I need to appraise the value of this property before listing it.”
  • A manager might appraise an employee’s performance during a yearly review, saying, “I will appraise your work based on specific criteria.”
  • In an antique shop, a customer might ask the owner, “Can you appraise this old pocket watch for me?”

37. Scan

To glance at or examine something quickly or superficially. “Scan” is often used when reviewing or searching for specific information.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to scan this textbook to find the relevant chapter.”
  • A person reading a news article might scan the text to find key points or interesting details.
  • When reviewing a document, a lawyer might scan for any important legal terms or clauses.
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38. Investigate

To thoroughly examine or research a subject or situation in order to uncover facts or information. “Investigate” is often used when conducting a formal inquiry or examination.

  • For example, a detective might investigate a crime scene to gather evidence and solve a case.
  • A journalist might investigate a story by interviewing sources and gathering information from various sources.
  • When reviewing a scientific study, a researcher might investigate the methodology and results to assess the study’s validity.

39. Delve into

To explore or examine something in depth or with great detail. “Delve into” is often used when reviewing or analyzing complex topics or subjects.

  • For instance, a historian might delve into the archives to uncover new information about a historical event.
  • A literary critic might delve into the symbolism and themes of a novel in order to provide a deeper analysis.
  • When reviewing a financial report, an accountant might delve into the numbers to identify any discrepancies or trends.

40. Look through

To examine or review the contents of something, often by browsing or skimming through. “Look through” is often used when quickly reviewing or browsing through a collection of items or information.

  • For example, a person might look through a photo album to reminisce about past memories.
  • A researcher might look through a database of articles to find relevant sources for their study.
  • When reviewing a stack of resumes, a hiring manager might look through them to find suitable candidates for a job position.

41. Go through

To carefully review or analyze something in detail. This phrase implies a thorough examination or assessment of a particular subject or item.

  • For example, “I need to go through all the documents before making a decision.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Let’s go through the plan step by step.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Did you go through your notes before the exam?”

42. Take a look at

To visually inspect or examine something briefly. This phrase suggests a quick or casual assessment of a particular object or situation.

  • For instance, “Can you take a look at this report and let me know if there are any errors?”
  • In a conversation about a new car, someone might ask, “Would you like to take a look at the interior?”
  • A friend might say, “Take a look at this picture. It’s hilarious!”

43. Give a once-over

To quickly look over or examine something. This phrase implies a brief or cursory assessment of a particular subject or item.

  • For example, “Before submitting the proposal, give it a once-over to check for any mistakes.”
  • In a discussion about a new outfit, someone might say, “Can you give me a once-over to see if everything looks good?”
  • A supervisor might ask an employee, “Can you give this document a once-over and make sure it’s error-free?”

44. Peek at

To take a quick, discreet, or furtive look at something. This phrase implies a brief or secretive assessment of a particular object or situation.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t resist peeking at the presents before Christmas Day.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “Make sure the guest of honor doesn’t peek at the decorations.”
  • A child might ask a friend, “Can I peek at your test answers?”

45. Scope out

To survey or investigate a particular area or situation. This phrase suggests a thorough assessment or examination of a specific location or circumstance.

  • For example, “We need to scope out the competition before launching our new product.”
  • In a discussion about a potential vacation spot, someone might say, “Let’s scope out the hotel reviews before making a reservation.”
  • A detective might say, “I’ll scope out the crime scene for any potential clues.”

46. Size up

To assess or evaluate someone or something, often in terms of their abilities, strengths, or weaknesses. The term “size up” is commonly used in informal settings or conversations.

  • For example, a coach might say, “I need to size up the competition before the game.”
  • In a job interview, an employer might ask, “How do you size up your own performance in your previous role?”
  • A friend might comment, “I always size up a restaurant based on its menu and customer reviews.”

47. Break down

To analyze or examine something in detail, often by breaking it into smaller parts or components. The term “break down” is used to emphasize the thoroughness of the examination.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Let’s break down the steps of this math problem.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “I will now break down the key components of our marketing strategy.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s break down the pros and cons of each option before making a decision.”

48. Closely examine

To closely and carefully examine or scrutinize something in order to understand it better or to identify any issues or problems. The term “closely examine” implies a detailed and thorough inspection.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to closely examine the crime scene for any potential evidence.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might state, “We will closely examine the data to identify any patterns or trends.”
  • A teacher might instruct students, “Take your time to closely examine the artwork and identify its unique features.”

49. Check up on

To check or verify the status or progress of someone or something, often to ensure that everything is in order or to gather information. The term “check up on” is commonly used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I need to check up on my kids to see if they’ve finished their homework.”
  • In a project management meeting, a team leader might ask, “Can you check up on the progress of the tasks assigned to each team member?”
  • A friend might text, “Just checking up on you to see how you’re doing.”

50. Review and assess

To review or examine something in order to make an assessment or judgment about its quality, effectiveness, or importance. The term “review and assess” emphasizes the process of evaluating and analyzing.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Let’s review and assess the performance of each team member.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might state, “We will review and assess your understanding of the material through a quiz.”
  • A customer might leave a review, “I wanted to review and assess the product to help others make an informed decision.”