Top 38 Slang For Sad – Meaning & Usage

Feeling down? Need some words to express your sadness? Well, you’re in luck because we’ve compiled a list of top slang for sad. Whether you’re feeling blue, bummed out, or just downright gloomy, this list will have you covered with all the trendy words to describe your emotions. Get ready to dive into the world of sadness slang and add some flair to your vocabulary!

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1. Blue

When someone is feeling “blue,” they are experiencing sadness or a low mood. This term is often used to describe a general feeling of sadness or melancholy.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling really blue since my dog passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit blue today, not sure why.”
  • In a song lyric, you might hear, “I’m feeling so blue without you.”

2. Down in the dumps

When someone is “down in the dumps,” they are feeling extremely sad or depressed. This expression is often used to describe a state of deep sadness or despair.

  • For instance, “Ever since she lost her job, she’s been down in the dumps.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling down in the dumps lately, everything seems to be going wrong.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s mood, you might hear, “He’s been down in the dumps ever since his breakup.”

3. Bummed out

When someone is “bummed out,” they are feeling disappointed or let down. This term is often used to describe a feeling of sadness or frustration due to something not going as expected.

  • For example, “I’m really bummed out that I didn’t get the job.”
  • A person might say, “I was really looking forward to the concert, but it got canceled. I’m so bummed out.”
  • In a conversation about plans falling through, someone might say, “I was supposed to go on vacation, but now I’m just bummed out.”

4. Heartbroken

When someone is “heartbroken,” they are feeling intense sadness or grief, often due to a loss or a significant emotional event. This term is used to describe a deep emotional pain or sorrow.

  • For instance, “She was heartbroken when her best friend moved away.”
  • A person might say, “I’m absolutely heartbroken over the loss of my grandfather.”
  • In a discussion about a breakup, you might hear, “He was heartbroken when she ended their relationship.”

5. Gloomy

When someone is feeling “gloomy,” they are experiencing a sense of melancholy or pessimism. This term is often used to describe a mood or atmosphere that is dark, sad, or lacking in cheerfulness.

  • For example, “The rainy weather made me feel gloomy.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been in a gloomy mood all day, can’t seem to shake it off.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s outlook on life, you might hear, “She tends to have a gloomy perspective on things.”

6. Depressed

Feeling extremely sad, hopeless, and unmotivated. “Depressed” is often used to describe a more severe and long-lasting form of sadness.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been feeling really depressed lately, and it’s hard to find any joy in anything.”
  • A person going through a difficult time might express, “I feel so depressed that I can’t even get out of bed in the morning.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I’m here for you if you need to talk. It’s important to reach out when you’re feeling depressed.”

7. Melancholic

Experiencing a deep, long-lasting sadness or gloominess. “Melancholic” often implies a sense of nostalgia or longing for something that is lost or unattainable.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t shake this melancholic feeling. It’s like a cloud hanging over me.”
  • A person reflecting on past memories might say, “I often get melancholic when I think about my childhood and how carefree it was.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling melancholic because of the breakup? I’m here to listen if you want to talk.”

8. Sorrowful

Feeling deep sadness or grief, often due to a loss or unfortunate event. “Sorrowful” describes a state of intense emotional pain and suffering.

  • For example, someone might say, “I received the news of my grandmother’s passing, and I am absolutely sorrowful.”
  • A person sharing their feelings might say, “I feel so sorrowful after the breakup. It’s like a piece of me is missing.”
  • A friend offering comfort might say, “I know you’re going through a sorrowful time, but remember that you’re not alone. I’m here for you.”

9. Dejected

Feeling sad, disappointed, or discouraged. “Dejected” often implies a sense of being deflated or defeated.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I didn’t get the job I wanted, and I’m feeling dejected.”
  • A person expressing their emotions might say, “I feel so dejected after failing my exam. I worked so hard.”
  • A friend offering support might say, “Don’t be too dejected. There are always new opportunities waiting for you. Keep your head up.”

10. Despondent

Feeling extreme sadness, despair, and a lack of hope or motivation. “Despondent” often describes a state of deep emotional distress and a sense of giving up.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m feeling despondent about my future. I don’t see any way out of this situation.”
  • A person expressing their emotions might say, “I feel so despondent after the loss of my loved one. I can’t imagine life without them.”
  • A friend offering comfort might say, “I know it’s hard, but try not to stay despondent. There is always a glimmer of hope, even in the darkest times.”

11. Miserable

When you’re feeling absolutely terrible, you can describe yourself as miserable.

  • For example, “After failing my exam, I felt miserable for days.”
  • A person going through a breakup might say, “I’m so miserable without them.”
  • When someone asks how you’re doing on a bad day, you might respond with, “I’m feeling miserable.”

12. Crestfallen

Crestfallen describes the feeling of being let down or defeated.

  • For instance, “She was crestfallen when her favorite team lost the game.”
  • A person who didn’t get the job they wanted might say, “I walked out of the interview feeling crestfallen.”
  • When someone tells you some bad news, you might respond with a crestfallen expression.
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13. Woebegone

Woebegone refers to a state of deep sadness or misery.

  • For example, “The woebegone expression on her face told me something was wrong.”
  • A person describing a sad movie might say, “The film left me feeling woebegone.”
  • When you see someone crying, you might ask, “What’s got you looking so woebegone?”

14. Dismal

Dismal describes something that is gloomy or depressing.

  • For instance, “The weather was so dismal that it ruined our plans for a picnic.”
  • A person might describe their financial situation as “dismal” when they’re struggling to make ends meet.
  • When someone asks how your day was and it was particularly bad, you might respond with, “It was just dismal.”

15. Morose

Morose describes a person who is sullen, gloomy, or ill-tempered.

  • For example, “He sat in the corner, looking morose and refusing to join in the conversation.”
  • A person who is feeling down might say, “I’ve been feeling a bit morose lately.”
  • When someone asks why you’re not your usual cheerful self, you might respond with, “I’m feeling a bit morose today.”

16. Sullen

This word describes a gloomy or sulky mood, often accompanied by a lack of energy or enthusiasm.

  • For example, “He sat in the corner with a sullen expression, refusing to join in the conversation.”
  • A person might say, “I woke up feeling sullen today, I just can’t shake this sadness.”
  • In a story, a character might be described as “having a sullen disposition, always wearing a frown.”

17. Forlorn

This word conveys a sense of abandonment or loneliness, often accompanied by a feeling of hopelessness or despair.

  • For instance, “She looked forlorn as she sat alone at the cafe, staring out the window.”
  • A person might say, “I feel forlorn after the breakup, like I’ve lost a part of myself.”
  • In a poem, the poet might describe a desolate landscape as “forlorn and empty, devoid of life.”

18. Bereaved

This word refers to someone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, particularly through death. It conveys a sense of deep sorrow and mourning.

  • For example, “The bereaved family gathered to remember their loved one and offer support to one another.”
  • A person might say, “I am still bereaved after the passing of my father, the pain is still fresh.”
  • In a support group, someone might share their experiences and say, “I find solace in connecting with other bereaved individuals who understand my pain.”

19. Desolate

This word describes a feeling of complete emptiness or abandonment, often accompanied by a sense of isolation or desolation.

  • For instance, “The old house stood in a desolate state, with broken windows and overgrown weeds.”
  • A person might say, “I feel desolate after losing my job, like my purpose has been taken away.”
  • In a novel, the author might describe a desolate landscape as “void of life, with no signs of civilization in sight.”

20. Wretched

This word conveys a sense of extreme unhappiness or suffering, often accompanied by physical or emotional pain.

  • For example, “The wretched man sat on the street corner, shivering in the cold.”
  • A person might say, “I feel wretched after the argument, like my heart has been shattered.”
  • In a play, a character might exclaim, “Oh, wretched me! I am cursed with eternal sadness.”

21. Tragic

This word describes something that is extremely sad or unfortunate. It often refers to events or situations that involve loss, suffering, or disaster.

  • For example, “The tragic news of the plane crash left everyone in shock.”
  • A person might say, “It’s tragic how many lives were lost in the natural disaster.”
  • In a discussion about a sad movie, someone might comment, “The ending was so tragic, it left me in tears.”

22. Weary

While “weary” can describe physical tiredness, it can also be used to express a deep emotional or mental fatigue. It conveys a sense of being worn out or drained.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I feel so weary.”
  • A person going through a difficult time might say, “I’m feeling weary of the constant struggles.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might comment, “I’m growing weary of trying to find a solution.”

23. Lamentable

This word expresses a feeling of sadness or disappointment, often accompanied by a sense of regret. It is used to describe something that is unfortunate or deserving of sympathy.

  • For example, “The loss of such a talented artist is truly lamentable.”
  • A person might say, “It’s lamentable that we couldn’t save the endangered species.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might comment, “The outcome was truly lamentable, considering all the effort we put in.”

24. Anguished

This word describes an intense and prolonged feeling of emotional pain, distress, or suffering. It conveys a sense of deep anguish or torment.

  • For instance, “Her anguished cries echoed through the empty room.”
  • A person going through a heartbreaking breakup might say, “I feel so anguished and lost.”
  • In a conversation about a tragic event, someone might comment, “The anguished expressions on their faces said it all.”

25. Distressed

This word describes a state of extreme sadness, anxiety, or despair. It often conveys a sense of being overwhelmed or deeply troubled.

  • For example, “She looked visibly distressed after receiving the bad news.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling so distressed about the current state of the world.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult situation, someone might comment, “The distressed look on his face showed how much he was struggling.”

26. Disheartened

Feeling a sense of disappointment or loss of hope. “Disheartened” describes a deep emotional state of sadness and discouragement.

  • For example, “She felt disheartened after receiving another rejection letter.”
  • A person might say, “I’m disheartened by the lack of progress we’ve made.”
  • In a conversation about setbacks, someone might comment, “It’s easy to become disheartened when faced with constant obstacles.”

27. Melancholy

A feeling of sadness or depression, often with a reflective or nostalgic undertone. “Melancholy” is a poetic term used to describe a deep and profound sadness.

  • For instance, “The rainy weather made her feel melancholy.”
  • A person might say, “I often find myself lost in melancholy thoughts.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might mention, “Many romantic poets wrote about the beauty of melancholy.”

28. Tearful

Feeling or showing a tendency to cry. “Tearful” describes a state of sadness that is accompanied by tears or the urge to cry.

  • For example, “She became tearful when she heard the news.”
  • A person might say, “I always get tearful during sad movies.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, someone might admit, “I’ve had many tearful nights lately.”

29. Regretful

Feeling or expressing regret or remorse. “Regretful” describes a state of sadness or disappointment over past actions or decisions.

  • For instance, “He felt regretful for not taking the opportunity when it was presented.”
  • A person might say, “I’m regretful for the way I treated her.”
  • In a discussion about missed opportunities, someone might comment, “I have many regretful moments in my life.”

30. Unhappy

Feeling or showing a sense of unhappiness or sorrow. “Unhappy” is a general term used to describe a state of sadness or dissatisfaction.

  • For example, “She seemed unhappy with her current job.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling unhappy lately.”
  • In a conversation about personal well-being, someone might admit, “I’m in an unhappy place in my life right now.”

31. Sappy

This term is used to describe someone who is overly emotional or mushy. It often refers to someone who is easily moved to tears or expresses their emotions in an exaggerated way.

  • For example, “She always gets sappy during romantic movies.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle sappy love songs, they make me cry.”
  • Another might comment, “His sappy speech at the wedding brought everyone to tears.”

32. Downtrodden

This word describes someone who is feeling oppressed or treated unfairly. It often conveys a sense of being defeated or crushed by circumstances or other people.

  • For instance, “The downtrodden workers protested for better wages.”
  • A person might say, “She looked downtrodden after receiving the bad news.”
  • Another might comment, “The downtrodden character in the book faces constant hardships.”

33. Blue-hearted

This term refers to someone who is feeling down or sad. It suggests a deep sense of sadness or melancholy, often associated with a broken heart or emotional pain.

  • For example, “She had a blue-hearted expression after the breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I feel blue-hearted every time I listen to sad music.”
  • Another might comment, “The blue-hearted protagonist in the movie struggles with personal demons.”

34. Low-spirited

This word describes someone who is feeling down or lacking in spirit or energy. It conveys a sense of sadness or despondency, often accompanied by a loss of motivation or enthusiasm.

  • For instance, “He appeared low-spirited after receiving the rejection letter.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling low-spirited lately, I need a pick-me-up.”
  • Another might comment, “The low-spirited atmosphere in the room was palpable.”

35. Glum

This term is used to describe someone who is feeling sad or gloomy. It suggests a downcast or sullen demeanor, often accompanied by a lack of enthusiasm or optimism.

  • For example, “He had a glum expression on his face.”
  • A person might say, “I feel glum on rainy days.”
  • Another might comment, “The glum protagonist in the novel struggles to find joy in life.”

36. Devastated

To be extremely upset or emotionally destroyed.

  • For example, “She was devastated when she found out her dog had passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I was devastated when I didn’t get the job I wanted.”
  • Another might express, “I feel devastated after the breakup.”

37. Woeful

To feel extremely sad or unhappy.

  • For instance, “He had a woeful expression on his face.”
  • A person might say, “I had a woeful day at work.”
  • Another might express, “I feel woeful about not being able to attend the party.”

38. Lamenting

To express deep sorrow or sadness.

  • For example, “She was lamenting the loss of her loved one.”
  • A person might say, “I heard her lamenting about her failed relationship.”
  • Another might express, “He was seen lamenting over his mistakes.”