Top 35 Slang For Saving Money – Meaning & Usage

Saving money is always a smart move, and now Fluentslang is here to help you do it with style. We’ve curated a list of the top slang terms for saving money that will have you feeling like a financial guru in no time. From “frugalista” to “dollar stretcher,” we’ve got all the insider lingo you need to navigate the world of personal finance and keep your wallet happy. Get ready to level up your savings game with this must-read listicle!

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1. Dough

This term refers to money in general, and is often used in the context of saving money. It can also be used to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up some dough for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might mention, “Cutting back on unnecessary expenses can help you save dough.”
  • A person might ask, “How much dough do you have saved up for emergencies?”

2. Bucks

This slang term is commonly used to refer to money, specifically in the form of dollars. It can be used to talk about saving money or the cost of something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I saved 100 bucks by buying the item on sale.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, a person might mention, “I’m trying to save 500 bucks each month.”
  • A person might ask, “How many bucks do you have in your savings account?”

3. Cabbage

This term is slang for money, and can be used to talk about saving money or the general concept of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m trying to save some cabbage for a rainy day.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, a person might mention, “Cutting back on expenses can help you grow your cabbage.”
  • A person might ask, “How much cabbage do you have saved up for retirement?”

4. Cheddar

This slang term is often used to refer to money, specifically in the form of cash. It can be used to talk about saving money or the amount of money someone has.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up some cheddar for a down payment.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, a person might mention, “I want to have 10,000 cheddar in my emergency fund.”
  • A person might ask, “How much cheddar do you have in your wallet?”

5. Moola

This term is slang for money, and can be used to talk about saving money or the general concept of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up some moola for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, a person might mention, “Investing can help you grow your moola.”
  • A person might ask, “How much moola do you have saved up for a big purchase?”

6. Scratch

This term refers to physical money, usually in the form of bills or coins. It can also be used to mean money in general.

  • For example, “I need some scratch to pay the bills.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been saving up my scratch for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might ask, “How much scratch do you have in your savings account?”

7. Bread

This slang term is used to refer to money, particularly in the form of cash.

  • For instance, “I need to earn some bread to pay my rent.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working overtime to bring in more dough.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much bread do you have saved up?”

8. Stash

This term is used to describe money that is saved or set aside for future use. It can also refer to a hidden or secret supply of money.

  • For example, “I have a stash of cash hidden under my mattress.”
  • A person might say, “I’m building up my stash for a down payment on a house.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might ask, “How much do you have in your stash?”

9. Coin

This term is a slang way to refer to money in general, particularly in the form of coins.

  • For instance, “I found some spare coin in my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always trying to save up my coin.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Do you have any extra coin to borrow?”

10. Loot

This term is slang for money, especially in the form of cash. It can also be used to refer to stolen or ill-gotten money.

  • For example, “I need to find a way to earn some quick loot.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been saving up my loot for a new car.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might ask, “How much loot do you have in your bank account?”

11. Greenbacks

This slang term refers to paper currency, particularly U.S. dollars. The term “greenbacks” comes from the green ink used on the back of U.S. banknotes.

  • For example, “I need to save up some greenbacks for my vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got a pocketful of greenbacks, ready to spend.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “It’s important to have a stash of greenbacks for emergencies.”

12. Benjamins

This slang term specifically refers to one hundred dollar bills, which feature a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, on the front.

  • For instance, “He paid for dinner with a stack of Benjamins.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got a few Benjamins hidden away for a rainy day.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, someone might mention, “If you want to make it rain, you need a lot of Benjamins.”

13. Clams

This slang term refers to money in general, with origins in the idea that clams were once used as a form of currency.

  • For example, “I need to save up some clams for that new gadget.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always on the lookout for ways to earn more clams.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “Cutting back on unnecessary expenses helps me save more clams.”

14. Wad

This slang term refers to a bundle of cash, often folded or rolled together.

  • For instance, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the car.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been saving up a wad of money for a down payment.”
  • In a conversation about financial security, someone might mention, “Having a wad of cash hidden away can provide peace of mind.”

15. Bankroll

This slang term refers to a person’s financial resources or funding, often used to describe the amount of money someone has available for a particular purpose.

  • For example, “He used his bankroll to invest in a new business.”
  • A person might say, “I need to build up my bankroll before I can start my dream project.”
  • In a discussion about financial independence, someone might mention, “Having a solid bankroll can give you the freedom to pursue your passions.”

16. Nest egg

A nest egg refers to a sum of money that has been saved or invested over time, typically for a specific purpose such as retirement or a large purchase.

  • For example, “I’ve been putting money aside each month to build up my nest egg for when I retire.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to start saving early and regularly to grow your nest egg.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m trying to build up a nest egg so I can buy a house in the future.”

17. Coinage

Coinage is a slang term for money, derived from the fact that coins are a form of currency.

  • For instance, “I need some coinage to pay for this coffee.”
  • A person might say, “I’m short on coinage right now, can you lend me some?”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much coinage do you have saved up?”

18. Stacks

Stacks is a term used to describe a large amount of money, usually in the form of cash. It refers to a stack of bills.

  • For example, “He walked into the club with stacks of cash.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up to buy a car, I need to stack up some money.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to have stacks of money in my bank account.”

19. Paper

Paper is a colloquial term for cash, referring to the fact that paper currency is a common form of money.

  • For instance, “I need some paper to pay for this concert ticket.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to save up enough paper to go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much paper do you have in your wallet?”

20. Savings

Savings refers to the money that has been set aside or saved for future use or emergencies.

  • For example, “I have a portion of my paycheck automatically deposited into my savings account.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to build up my savings so I can buy a house.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might ask, “What percentage of your income do you put into savings?”

21. Rainy day fund

This term refers to money that is set aside for unexpected expenses or financial emergencies. It is important to have a rainy day fund to ensure financial stability.

  • For example, “I had to dip into my rainy day fund when my car broke down.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Make sure you have at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses in your rainy day fund.”
  • Someone discussing financial planning might say, “Having a rainy day fund can provide peace of mind during uncertain times.”

22. Piggy bank

A piggy bank is a small container, often in the shape of a pig, used to store loose change or small amounts of money. It is commonly used by children as a way to save their allowance or spare change.

  • For instance, “My son loves putting his coins in his piggy bank.”
  • A parent might encourage their child, “Remember to put your money in the piggy bank instead of spending it right away.”
  • Someone reminiscing about their childhood might say, “I used to have a piggy bank filled with coins that I saved up over the years.”

23. Tighten the belt

This phrase means to reduce spending and live more frugally. It is often used when someone needs to cut back on expenses and save money.

  • For example, “With the recent pay cut, I need to tighten my belt and be more careful with my spending.”
  • A financial advisor might suggest, “If you want to save more money, you should tighten your belt and eliminate unnecessary expenses.”
  • Someone discussing their budget might say, “I’ve been tightening my belt by cooking at home instead of eating out.”

24. Penny-pinching

Penny-pinching refers to the act of being extremely frugal or stingy with money. It involves being conscious of every penny spent and finding ways to save money.

  • For instance, “My grandmother is a penny-pincher and never spends money on anything unnecessary.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You’re such a penny-pincher, always looking for the cheapest deals.”
  • Someone discussing their money-saving strategies might say, “I’ve become a penny-pincher and started cutting back on non-essential expenses.”

25. Squirrel away

To squirrel away means to save or hoard money, similar to how a squirrel collects and stores nuts for the winter. It implies the act of setting aside money for future use.

  • For example, “I’ve been squirreling away money for a vacation next year.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Try to squirrel away a portion of your income each month for retirement.”
  • Someone discussing their savings goals might say, “I’m trying to squirrel away as much money as possible to buy a house.”

26. Living within your means

This phrase means to spend money only on necessary expenses and not exceeding your income. It emphasizes the importance of budgeting and avoiding unnecessary debt.

  • For example, “I can’t afford a luxury vacation right now, I need to focus on living within my means.”
  • Someone might advise, “If you want to save money, start by living within your means and cutting unnecessary expenses.”
  • A financial expert might say, “Living within your means is the key to long-term financial stability.”

27. Hoarding cash

This term refers to the act of saving money by keeping a significant amount of cash on hand, often in a hidden or secret location. It implies a desire to have a financial safety net or to save for a specific goal.

  • For instance, “He’s been hoarding cash in his mattress for years, just in case.”
  • In a discussion about emergency funds, someone might mention, “Hoarding cash is one way to prepare for unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been hoarding cash so I can finally buy my dream car.”

28. Stashing cash

This slang term means to save money by hiding or storing it in a safe or secret place. It implies a desire to keep the money safe and secure, often for future use or as a form of emergency savings.

  • For example, “She’s been stashing cash in a shoebox under her bed to save up for a vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been stashing cash in a lockbox to save up for a down payment on a house.”
  • In a discussion about financial preparedness, someone might mention, “It’s always a good idea to have some stashed cash in case of emergencies.”

29. Skimping

This term refers to the act of reducing or minimizing expenses in order to save money. It often involves making sacrifices and being more mindful of spending habits.

  • For instance, “I’ve been skimping on eating out and cooking at home to save money.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “Skimping on non-essential purchases can help you reach your savings goals.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to save money, start by skimping on unnecessary expenses like cable TV or eating out.”

30. Saving for a rainy day

This phrase means to save money for future emergencies or unforeseen circumstances. It emphasizes the importance of having a financial safety net and being prepared for unexpected financial challenges.

  • For example, “I’ve been saving for a rainy day by putting a portion of each paycheck into an emergency fund.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might mention, “It’s important to prioritize saving for a rainy day over unnecessary expenses.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Make sure you have at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses saved for a rainy day.”

31. Cutting back

This term refers to the act of reducing or limiting expenses in order to save money. It often involves making sacrifices or changes in spending habits.

  • For example, “I’m cutting back on eating out to save money for my vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m cutting back on my shopping to pay off my debt.”
  • Someone might discuss their budgeting strategies by saying, “Cutting back on non-essential expenses has helped me save a lot of money.”

32. Frugal living

Frugal living refers to a lifestyle where individuals prioritize saving money and avoiding unnecessary expenses. It involves being mindful of spending and finding ways to save without sacrificing quality of life.

  • For instance, “She practices frugal living by shopping at thrift stores and cooking meals at home.”
  • A person might share their frugal living tips by saying, “I save money by buying in bulk and using coupons.”
  • Someone might describe their frugal living journey by saying, “Frugal living has allowed me to achieve financial independence.”

33. Bargain hunting

Bargain hunting refers to the act of actively searching for and taking advantage of discounted prices or special deals. It involves looking for the best value for money.

  • For example, “She enjoys bargain hunting at thrift stores and clearance sales.”
  • A person might say, “I spend my weekends bargain hunting for furniture and home decor.”
  • Someone might share their successful bargain hunting story by saying, “I found a designer handbag for 70% off while bargain hunting online.”

34. Couponing

Couponing is the practice of using coupons to save money on purchases. It involves collecting and redeeming coupons to get discounts or special offers.

  • For instance, “She saves a lot of money by couponing and stacking coupons with sales.”
  • A person might say, “I dedicate time each week to couponing and it has saved me hundreds of dollars.”
  • Someone might share their couponing strategy by saying, “I organize my coupons by category to make them easily accessible while shopping.”

35. DIY-ing

DIY-ing refers to the act of doing something yourself instead of hiring someone or buying a ready-made product or service. It often involves saving money by avoiding labor or service costs.

  • For example, “She enjoys DIY-ing home renovations and repairs to save money.”
  • A person might say, “I’m DIY-ing my wedding decorations to save on costs.”
  • Someone might share their DIY-ing success by saying, “I saved a lot of money by DIY-ing my own car repairs instead of going to a mechanic.”
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