Top 35 Slang For Saving – Meaning & Usage

Saving money is a skill that everyone can benefit from, but navigating the world of personal finance can be overwhelming. That’s why we’ve put together a handy guide to the latest slang for saving that will help you stay on top of your financial game. From “frugalista” to “budget ninja,” we’ve got you covered with all the tips and tricks you need to start saving like a pro. So, get ready to level up your money-saving game and join us on this journey to financial success!

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1. Stash

This term refers to setting aside money or valuables in a hidden or secret place, often for future use or emergencies. It implies keeping the savings discreet and away from prying eyes.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a stash of cash hidden under my mattress for emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about financial planning, one might mention, “It’s always a good idea to have a stash of savings for unexpected expenses.”
  • A person discussing their budgeting habits might reveal, “I stash away a portion of my paycheck every month to save up for a vacation.”

2. Nest egg

This term refers to a substantial amount of money or assets that are saved or invested for the future, typically for retirement or a major life goal. It symbolizes the idea of nurturing and protecting one’s savings to allow them to grow over time.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been building my nest egg for years so I can retire comfortably.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, one might advise, “Start saving early to build a solid nest egg for your future.”
  • A person sharing their financial success story might say, “I managed to grow my small nest egg into a substantial amount through disciplined saving and investing.”

3. Rainy day fund

This term refers to money set aside specifically for unforeseen expenses or emergencies. It implies the need to be prepared for unexpected financial challenges that may arise in the future.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I always make sure to have a rainy day fund in case my car breaks down.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, one might mention, “Having a rainy day fund can provide peace of mind during difficult times.”
  • A person discussing their saving habits might reveal, “I automatically contribute a portion of my income to my rainy day fund every month.”

4. Sock away

This term means to save money diligently and consistently, often in large amounts. It conveys the idea of stashing away money for future use or financial security.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been socking away money for years to buy my dream house.”
  • In a discussion about financial discipline, one might advise, “Try to sock away as much as you can from each paycheck to build your savings.”
  • A person sharing their financial journey might say, “I started socking away money early on and it has allowed me to achieve my financial goals.”

5. Hoard cash

This term means to accumulate or gather a significant amount of cash and keep it stored or saved. It implies the act of holding onto cash rather than spending or investing it.

  • For instance, someone might say, “During uncertain times, it’s natural to hoard cash as a safety net.”
  • In a conversation about financial strategies, one might mention, “Some people hoard cash as a way to protect themselves from economic downturns.”
  • A person discussing their saving habits might reveal, “I tend to hoard cash and only spend it when absolutely necessary.”

6. Store up

To save or gather a large amount of something over time. “Store up” can refer to saving money, resources, or even emotions.

  • For example, a financial advisor might recommend, “Store up your savings for emergencies.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Store up your energy for the big game tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about preparing for a project, someone might say, “Let’s store up extra materials, just in case.”

7. Stockpile

To accumulate a large quantity of something, often in preparation for future use or to have a surplus. “Stockpile” can refer to saving money, supplies, or even knowledge.

  • For instance, during a natural disaster, people might stockpile food and water.
  • A book lover might say, “I love to stockpile books so I always have something to read.”
  • In a discussion about investing, someone might mention, “It’s important to stockpile knowledge about the market before making any decisions.”

8. Save up

To set money aside for a specific purpose or to accumulate savings over time. “Save up” implies a deliberate effort to save money.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m trying to save up for a vacation.”
  • A teenager might tell their friends, “I’m saving up to buy a new video game.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might say, “I want to save up enough money to buy a car.”

9. Tuck money away

To save or hide money in a secret or secure place. “Tuck money away” implies a secretive or cautious approach to saving money.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I like to tuck money away in a jar to save for a rainy day.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Tuck money away in your piggy bank so you can buy something special.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might suggest, “Tuck money away in a high-interest savings account to earn more over time.”

10. Set aside

To designate or reserve something, such as money or time, for a specific purpose. “Set aside” implies intentionally putting something aside for later use or saving.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to set aside some money for bills.”
  • A student might tell their friends, “I have to set aside time to study for my exams.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “It’s important to set aside a portion of your income for savings.”

11. Keep back

This phrase means to save or reserve money for future use. It implies the act of holding back or not spending all of one’s income.

  • For example, a financial advisor might advise, “It’s important to keep back a portion of your paycheck for emergencies.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might say, “I always keep back a certain amount each month to save for a vacation.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m trying to keep back enough money to buy a new car.”

12. Reserve funds

This term refers to money that is set aside for unexpected expenses or emergencies. It serves as a safety net for financial stability.

  • For instance, a financial planner might recommend, “You should have at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses in reserve funds.”
  • A person discussing personal finance might say, “I’m working on building up my reserve funds to provide a cushion in case of job loss.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to have enough reserve funds to cover any unexpected medical expenses.”

13. Accumulate savings

This phrase means to gradually increase the amount of money saved over time. It implies the act of consistently setting aside money for future use.

  • For example, a financial advisor might recommend, “To achieve your financial goals, you need to accumulate savings regularly.”
  • A person discussing personal finance might say, “I’m trying to accumulate savings by cutting back on unnecessary expenses.”
  • In a conversation about long-term financial planning, someone might mention, “I want to accumulate enough savings to retire comfortably.”

14. Guard the pennies

This phrase means to be cautious and frugal with one’s spending, especially when it comes to small amounts of money. It emphasizes the importance of being mindful of even the smallest expenses.

  • For instance, a financial coach might advise, “If you want to save money, you need to guard the pennies and avoid unnecessary purchases.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might say, “I guard the pennies by bringing my lunch to work instead of eating out.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might mention, “Guarding the pennies is key to building wealth over time.”

15. Pinch the pennies

This phrase means to be extremely frugal or tight-fisted with money. It implies the act of being careful and resourceful in order to save even the smallest amounts.

  • For example, a financial advisor might recommend, “If you’re trying to save money, you need to pinch the pennies and cut back on non-essential expenses.”
  • A person discussing personal finance might say, “I pinch the pennies by shopping for groceries at discount stores and using coupons.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “Pinching the pennies is necessary when you’re on a tight budget.”

16. Watch the wallet

This phrase is used to remind someone to be careful with their money or to be mindful of their spending habits.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey, let’s go shopping, but remember to watch the wallet.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might advise, “If you want to save money, you need to watch the wallet and avoid unnecessary purchases.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “To achieve your savings goals, it’s important to watch the wallet and track your expenses closely.”

17. Budget for a rainy day

This phrase means to allocate funds specifically for unforeseen circumstances or financial emergencies.

  • For instance, a financial planner might say, “It’s important to budget for a rainy day by setting aside a portion of your income for emergencies.”
  • In a personal finance discussion, someone might mention, “I always make sure to budget for a rainy day so I’m prepared for any unexpected expenses.”
  • A friend might advise, “You should start budgeting for a rainy day to build up your emergency fund and have peace of mind.”

18. Piggy bank

A piggy bank is a traditional and often cute way to encourage saving money, particularly for children.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Put your spare change in your piggy bank and watch your savings grow.”
  • In a discussion about teaching kids about money, someone might recommend, “Using a piggy bank is a great way to introduce the concept of saving to young children.”
  • A person sharing a savings tip might suggest, “Try using a piggy bank to collect loose change and save up for something special.”

19. Salt money

This phrase refers to money that is set aside specifically for unforeseen circumstances or emergencies.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I always make sure to have some salt money saved up in case of emergencies.”
  • In a personal finance discussion, a person might mention, “Having salt money gives me peace of mind knowing that I’m prepared for unexpected expenses.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to prioritize saving salt money as part of your overall financial plan.”

20. Sock money away

This phrase means to save money consistently and regularly, often with the intention of building up savings over time.

  • For example, someone might say, “I sock money away every month to save up for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about saving strategies, a person might share, “One effective way to save is to sock money away automatically by setting up automatic transfers to a savings account.”
  • A financial expert might advise, “If you want to achieve your savings goals, it’s important to sock money away consistently and avoid unnecessary spending.”

21. Save for a rainy day

This phrase means to save money for unforeseen or emergency situations that may arise in the future.

  • For example, a financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to save for a rainy day by setting aside a portion of your income each month.”
  • A friend might say, “I always save for a rainy day in case of car repairs or medical emergencies.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Make sure to save some of your allowance for a rainy day so you have money for special occasions or unexpected expenses.”

22. Sock it to the side

This slang phrase means to save money by setting it aside or putting it away for future use.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to sock it to the side and save up for a vacation.”
  • A person discussing their financial goals might say, “I’m trying to sock it to the side so I can buy a house in a few years.”
  • A friend might encourage another to save by saying, “Instead of spending all your money, try socking some of it to the side for a rainy day.”

23. Put money in the kitty

This slang phrase means to contribute money to a shared fund or pool of money that is used for a specific purpose or goal.

  • For example, coworkers might put money in the kitty to buy a farewell gift for a colleague.
  • A group of friends might put money in the kitty to cover the cost of a weekend getaway.
  • A family might put money in the kitty to save up for a special event or celebration.
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24. Keep the change

This phrase means to save the extra money received as change when making a purchase.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I always keep the change from my purchases and save it in a jar.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Instead of spending your change, try keeping it and saving it up for something special.”
  • A parent might teach their child the importance of saving by saying, “Whenever you receive change, remember to keep it and save it for something you really want.”

25. Sock it away

This slang phrase means to save money by putting it in a safe place or storing it away for future use.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to sock away some money each month to save up for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person discussing their financial habits might say, “I always sock away a portion of my income to build up my savings.”
  • A friend might encourage another to save by saying, “Instead of spending all your money, try socking some of it away for a rainy day.”

26. Put money in the bank

This phrase means to deposit money into a bank account for safekeeping or future use.

  • For example, a financial advisor might say, “It’s important to put money in the bank to build savings.”
  • A parent might encourage their child to save by saying, “Remember to put your birthday money in the bank.”
  • A friend might give advice, “If you want to save for a vacation, start by putting money in the bank each month.”

27. Stash away

This slang phrase means to hide or save money in a secret or undisclosed location.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I like to stash away a portion of my paycheck for emergencies.”
  • A person discussing financial goals might say, “I’m trying to stash away as much money as I can for a down payment on a house.”
  • A friend might suggest, “If you want to save for a big purchase, try stashing away a little bit each week.”

28. Keep the pennies

This phrase means to save even the smallest amounts of money, emphasizing the importance of saving every penny.

  • For example, a financial advisor might say, “Keeping the pennies can add up to significant savings over time.”
  • Someone discussing their frugal habits might say, “I always keep the pennies and put them into a jar.”
  • A person giving advice might say, “If you want to save money, start by keeping the pennies and avoiding unnecessary expenses.”

29. Put money in the piggy bank

This phrase means to save money by physically putting it into a piggy bank, which is a small container typically shaped like a pig and used for storing loose change.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Remember to put your allowance in the piggy bank.”
  • A person discussing their saving habits might say, “I like to put money in the piggy bank as a visual reminder of my savings.”
  • A friend might suggest, “If you’re trying to save money, start by putting spare change in a piggy bank.”

30. Bankroll

In the context of saving, “bankroll” refers to having enough money to support or fund a particular endeavor or lifestyle.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up enough to bankroll my dream vacation.”
  • A person discussing their financial goals might say, “My goal is to have enough saved to bankroll my own business.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you think you’ll have enough money to bankroll your retirement?”

31. Keep in reserve

This phrase means to set aside or save something for future use or emergencies. It implies the act of putting something away for safekeeping or as a backup.

  • For example, “I always keep some money in reserve in case of unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might say, “I like to keep some snacks in reserve for when I get hungry.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “It’s important to keep some funds in reserve for unexpected bills.”

32. Pinch pennies

This idiom means to be extremely careful with one’s money and to be very thrifty or economical. It implies the act of making small savings or cutting expenses in order to save money.

  • For instance, “After losing his job, he had to start pinching pennies to make ends meet.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to pinch pennies by cooking at home instead of eating out.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might suggest, “If you want to save more, start pinching pennies by cutting unnecessary expenses.”

33. Scrimp and save

This phrase means to be very careful with one’s money and to save as much as possible. It implies the act of being frugal and making sacrifices in order to save money.

  • For example, “They had to scrimp and save in order to afford their dream vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to scrimp and save by using coupons and shopping sales.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m working hard to scrimp and save for a down payment on a house.”

34. Stockpile cash

This idiom means to gather or accumulate a large amount of cash or savings. It implies the act of hoarding or amassing money for future use or security.

  • For instance, “He decided to stockpile cash in case of a financial emergency.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to stockpile cash for a down payment on a car.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might suggest, “It’s always a good idea to stockpile cash for unexpected expenses.”

35. Stow away

This phrase means to save or set aside something for future use or emergencies. It implies the act of putting something away or hiding it in a safe place for later.

  • For example, “She stowed away some money in a secret compartment for a rainy day.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to stow away some extra cash for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about financial security, someone might mention, “It’s important to stow away some funds for unexpected expenses.”