Top 35 Slang For Savings – Meaning & Usage

Saving money doesn’t have to be a drag, especially when you have the right lingo to go with it. Join us as we uncover the top slang terms that savvy savers use to talk about their money-saving strategies. Whether you’re a budgeting beginner or a seasoned penny-pincher, this list is sure to have something to help you level up your savings game. So, buckle up and get ready to learn some new money-saving slang!

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1. Nest egg

A “nest egg” refers to a sum of money that is saved or invested for future use or emergencies. It is often used to secure a comfortable retirement or to have a financial cushion in case of unexpected expenses.

  • For example, “I’ve been working hard to build up my nest egg for retirement.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to start saving early and regularly contribute to your nest egg.”
  • Someone might say, “I had to dip into my nest egg to cover the cost of a major car repair.”

2. Rainy day fund

A “rainy day fund” is money set aside for unforeseen circumstances or emergencies. It serves as a financial safety net to cover unexpected expenses or income loss.

  • For instance, “I always make sure to have a rainy day fund in case of medical emergencies.”
  • A financial expert might advise, “It’s recommended to have at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses in your rainy day fund.”
  • Someone might say, “I had to dip into my rainy day fund when I lost my job and needed to cover my bills.”

3. Stash

To “stash” money means to hide or store it away, often in a secret or discreet manner. It implies keeping money separate from regular spending and saving it for a specific purpose or future use.

  • For example, “I have a stash of cash hidden in my sock drawer for emergencies.”
  • A person might say, “I’m stashing away money to save up for a vacation.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where should I stash my savings to keep them safe and easily accessible?”

4. Dough

In slang terms, “dough” is a common word used to refer to money. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner to talk about finances or currency.

  • For instance, “I need to save up some dough before I can afford that new gadget.”
  • A person might say, “I’m rolling in dough after getting a raise at work.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you lend me some dough until my next paycheck?”

5. Piggy bank

A “piggy bank” is a small container, often in the shape of a pig, used by children to store their savings. It is a symbol of saving money and financial responsibility, particularly for young individuals.

  • For example, “I used to keep all my spare change in a piggy bank when I was a kid.”
  • A parent might encourage their child by saying, “Put your allowance in your piggy bank and watch your savings grow.”
  • Someone might say, “I found some loose coins in my piggy bank and used them to buy a treat.”

6. Cabbage

This term refers to paper money or cash. It is believed to have originated from the similarity between the color of money and the color of cabbage leaves.

  • For example, “I need to save up some cabbage before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’ve got enough cabbage to cover my bills this month.”
  • A person might boast, “I just won a big poker game and walked away with a lot of cabbage.”

7. Loot

This slang term can refer to either money or stolen goods. It is often used in the context of acquiring wealth or making a profit.

  • For instance, “I need to find a way to earn some quick loot.”
  • In a discussion about a successful heist, someone might say, “They made off with a lot of loot.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I just found $100 in my jacket pocket! That’s some unexpected loot!”

8. Cash stash

This term refers to a hidden or secret stash of money. It implies that the money is being kept away for safekeeping or for future use.

  • For example, “I always keep a cash stash in case of emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about financial planning, someone might mention, “It’s a good idea to have a cash stash for unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might say, “I found a hidden cash stash in the attic while cleaning out my grandparents’ house!”

9. Coinage

This term can refer to either coins or money in general. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For instance, “I’ve got a jar full of coinage that I’m saving up.”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might say, “The coinage of this country is quite unique.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I just found a pile of coinage under my couch cushions!”

10. Greenbacks

This term specifically refers to paper money, particularly US dollars. It originated from the green color of the ink used on US banknotes.

  • For example, “I need to get some greenbacks before I can go shopping.”
  • In a conversation about currency exchange, someone might ask, “Do you have any greenbacks that you want to convert?”
  • A person might say, “I always carry some greenbacks as a backup in case my card doesn’t work.”

11. Bankroll

This term refers to a large sum of money that someone has, especially used for a specific purpose such as financing a business venture or gambling. It can also refer to someone’s overall wealth or financial resources.

  • For example, “He used his bankroll to start his own business.”
  • In a conversation about personal finances, someone might say, “I need to build up my bankroll before I can invest in real estate.”
  • A gambler might boast, “I won big and added to my bankroll at the casino last night.”

12. Wad

This slang term refers to a thick stack or bundle of cash, typically folded or rolled together. It can also be used to describe a large amount of money in general.

  • For instance, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the expensive dinner.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I want to save up a wad of money for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person might brag, “I always carry a wad of cash in case of emergencies.”

13. Funds

This term is a general way to refer to money or financial resources. It can be used in various contexts, such as personal finances, business finances, or fundraising.

  • For example, “I don’t have enough funds to buy a new car right now.”
  • In a conversation about a company’s budget, someone might say, “We need to allocate more funds to marketing.”
  • A person might ask for help, saying, “I’m trying to raise funds for a charity event.”

14. Reserve

This term can refer to a savings account where money is set aside for future use. It can also mean having something in reserve as a backup or precautionary measure.

  • For instance, “I have a reserve of money in case of emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “It’s important to build up a reserve for unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might suggest, “You should keep a reserve of supplies in case of a natural disaster.”

15. Hoard

This term refers to the act of collecting or accumulating a large amount of money or savings. It can also be used to describe someone who saves or holds onto money excessively.

  • For example, “He hoarded his savings for years to buy his dream car.”
  • In a conversation about financial habits, someone might say, “I tend to hoard money rather than spend it.”
  • A person might criticize someone’s behavior, saying, “She’s a hoarder when it comes to money, never wanting to spend anything.”

16. Jackpot

This term is often used to describe a significant or unexpected financial gain. It can refer to winning a large sum of money in a game of chance or receiving an unexpected windfall.

  • For example, “I hit the jackpot when I won the lottery!”
  • A person might say, “Finding that rare collectible in the attic was a jackpot.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Getting a promotion and a raise at the same time? That’s a jackpot!”

17. Treasure chest

This phrase is used to describe a collection of valuable items or a source of wealth that is kept secret or hidden away. It often implies that the wealth is substantial or highly prized.

  • For instance, “Her grandmother’s jewelry box is a treasure chest of heirlooms.”
  • A person might say, “Investing in real estate can be a treasure chest of potential wealth.”
  • Another might comment, “Opening a successful business can be a treasure chest of opportunities.”

18. Moolah

This term is a slang word for money. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, “I need some moolah to buy that new gadget.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up my moolah for a vacation.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me some moolah until payday?”

19. Nesting

This term refers to the act of setting aside money or resources for future use or emergencies. It implies the idea of creating a secure and comfortable nest egg.

  • For instance, “I’m nesting for retirement by contributing to my 401(k).”
  • A person might say, “I’m nesting for a rainy day by saving a portion of my income.”
  • Another might comment, “Nesting is important to build financial security and peace of mind.”

20. Coffer

This term is used to describe a person’s financial reserves or savings. It can also refer to a secure box or chest used to store valuable items, such as money or important documents.

  • For example, “He has a large coffer of savings to fall back on.”
  • A person might say, “I’m working hard to build up my coffer for future expenses.”
  • Another might comment, “Having a coffer of emergency funds can provide peace of mind during uncertain times.”

21. Safety net

A safety net refers to a designated amount of money set aside for unexpected expenses or emergencies. It provides a financial cushion to fall back on in times of need.

  • For example, “Having a safety net is important in case of unexpected medical bills.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Make sure you have at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses in your safety net.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel more secure knowing I have a safety net in case of job loss or major car repairs.”

22. Fund stash

A fund stash refers to a secret or hidden amount of money that is saved or set aside for a specific purpose or goal. It is often kept separate from regular savings or spending.

  • For instance, “I have a fund stash for my dream vacation to Hawaii.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been fund stashing for months to buy a new laptop.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have a fund stash for emergencies or unexpected expenses?”

23. Stockpile

To stockpile means to accumulate or gather a large amount of savings or money, often with the intention of saving it for future use or for a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I’ve been stockpiling money to buy a house.”
  • A person might say, “I’m stockpiling my savings for retirement.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you stockpiling your savings for a big purchase or investment?”

24. Treasure trove

A treasure trove refers to a collection or accumulation of wealth or savings that is considered valuable or precious. It implies a significant amount of money or assets.

  • For instance, “After years of saving, I finally have a treasure trove of money.”
  • A person might say, “I stumbled upon a treasure trove of savings when I found an old forgotten bank account.”
  • Someone might ask, “Have you been building a treasure trove of wealth for your future?”

25. Wealth reserve

A wealth reserve refers to a designated amount of money or assets that are set aside for future financial security or stability. It is a backup plan for maintaining wealth or financial well-being.

  • For example, “I have a wealth reserve to ensure I can retire comfortably.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Building a wealth reserve is essential for long-term financial success.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel more confident in my financial future knowing I have a wealth reserve to rely on.”

26. Reserve nest

This term refers to a sum of money set aside for unexpected expenses or emergencies. It’s like having a nest egg that you can rely on when times get tough.

  • For example, “I had to dip into my reserve nest when my car broke down.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to have a reserve nest that covers at least three to six months of living expenses.”
  • A person discussing personal finance might say, “I’m working on building up my reserve nest so I can have peace of mind.”

27. Money cache

This slang term refers to a hidden or secret amount of money that is saved or stored away. It’s like having a hidden cache of money that you can tap into when needed.

  • For instance, “I found a money cache under my mattress that I had forgotten about.”
  • A person discussing saving strategies might say, “I like to have a money cache that I contribute to regularly.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m building up my money cache so I can take that dream vacation.”

28. Emergency fund

An emergency fund is a specific amount of money set aside to cover unexpected expenses or financial emergencies. It’s like having a safety net that provides financial security in times of crisis.

  • For example, “I had to dip into my emergency fund when my roof started leaking.”
  • A financial planner might advise, “Everyone should have an emergency fund that covers at least three to six months of living expenses.”
  • A person discussing personal finance might say, “I’m working on building up my emergency fund to protect myself from unexpected expenses.”

29. Savings pot

This term refers to a container or account where money is saved over time. It’s like having a pot or jar where you collect and store your savings.

  • For instance, “I have a savings pot where I deposit a portion of my paycheck each month.”
  • A person discussing saving strategies might say, “I like to have a savings pot that I contribute to regularly.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m trying to grow my savings pot so I can buy a new car.”

30. Bread

This slang term refers to money in general. It’s like referring to money as a basic staple in life, similar to bread.

  • For example, “I need to make some extra bread to pay my bills.”
  • A person discussing finances might say, “I’m saving up some dough for a down payment on a house.”
  • Someone might ask, “How much bread do you have in your bank account?”

31. Bucks

This slang term is used to refer to money, specifically in the form of dollars. It is a casual way to talk about currency.

  • For example, “I paid 20 bucks for that shirt.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to save up a few more bucks before I can afford that vacation.”
  • A person discussing their budget might mention, “I only have a few bucks left for groceries this week.”

32. Fortune

This term is used to describe a significant amount of money. It implies that the amount is substantial and valuable.

  • For instance, “He inherited a fortune from his wealthy uncle.”
  • A person talking about a big win might say, “I won a small fortune at the casino last night.”
  • Someone might dream about their financial future and say, “I hope to amass a fortune through my business ventures.”

33. Rainy day savings

This phrase refers to money that is set aside for unexpected expenses or difficult times. It emphasizes the importance of having savings for unforeseen circumstances.

  • For example, “I dip into my rainy day savings to cover unexpected car repairs.”
  • A person discussing financial planning might advise, “It’s wise to have at least three months’ worth of expenses saved in your rainy day fund.”
  • Someone might mention, “I contribute a portion of my income to my rainy day savings account every month.”

34. Penny pinching

This term describes the act of being extremely careful and thrifty with money. It implies that someone is actively trying to save every penny they can.

  • For instance, “She’s always penny pinching and never splurges on anything.”
  • A person discussing their budgeting strategies might say, “I’m penny pinching to save up for a down payment on a house.”
  • Someone might complain, “I hate penny pinching, but I have to in order to make ends meet.”

35. Pocket change

This phrase refers to a small amount of money, typically coins or bills that can fit in a pocket. It is often used to describe an insignificant or trivial amount.

  • For example, “I found some pocket change under the couch cushions.”
  • A person discussing a small expense might say, “It only cost me pocket change.”
  • Someone might mention, “I’m not worried about a few dollars, it’s just pocket change.”
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