Top 47 Slang For Say – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, it’s essential to stay up-to-date with the latest slang. Sayings and expressions can change in the blink of an eye, and keeping up can feel like a never-ending challenge. Lucky for you, we’ve got your back. Our team at FluentSlang has scoured the internet to bring you a compilation of the top slang for “say” that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. Get ready to impress your friends and keep your vocabulary on fleek!

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1. Spill the tea

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to share interesting or scandalous information. It can also refer to someone actually spilling their drink.

  • For example, “What’s the tea on that celebrity couple? Spill it!”
  • A friend might say, “I have some tea to spill about our coworker’s secret relationship.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might ask, “Did anything interesting happen? Spill the tea!”

2. Speak your mind

This phrase encourages someone to be honest and open about their thoughts or feelings. It implies that there are no restrictions or consequences for speaking honestly.

  • For instance, “Don’t hold back, speak your mind about the issue.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I appreciate that you’re speaking your mind, even if I disagree.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “This is a safe space to speak your mind and share your ideas.”

3. Drop some knowledge

This phrase is used to encourage someone to share their expertise or enlighten others with interesting facts or insights.

  • For example, “I love it when you drop some knowledge about history.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Can you drop some knowledge about the latest advancements?”
  • A mentor might tell their mentee, “Don’t be afraid to drop some knowledge during your presentation. You have valuable insights to share.”

4. Let it out

This phrase encourages someone to express their pent-up emotions or thoughts. It implies that holding things in can be detrimental and that it’s important to let them out.

  • For instance, “If you’re feeling upset, just let it out and talk to someone.”
  • In a therapy session, a therapist might say, “This is a safe space for you to let it all out.”
  • A friend might offer support, “I can tell something’s bothering you. If you need to talk, just let it out.”

5. Lay it on me

This phrase is used to express eagerness to hear someone’s story, explanation, or information. It can also imply a willingness to accept criticism or feedback.

  • For example, “I’m ready to hear all the details, so lay it on me!”
  • In a job interview, an employer might say, “Tell me about your previous work experience. Lay it on me.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s been going on in your life? Lay it on me!”

6. Put it out there

This phrase means to express or reveal something, often in a straightforward manner. It can be used when encouraging someone to speak their mind or when someone is being open and honest.

  • For example, in a team meeting, a manager might say, “Don’t be afraid to put it out there. We want to hear your ideas.”
  • In a conversation about personal experiences, someone might say, “I decided to put it out there and tell my story.”
  • A friend might ask, “What do you think about the situation? Put it out there and let’s discuss.”

7. Give me the lowdown

This phrase is used when someone wants to know all the important or relevant information about a particular subject or situation. It is often used when seeking a summary or overview of something.

  • For instance, if someone is going on a trip, they might ask a friend, “Can you give me the lowdown on the best places to visit?”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, someone might say, “I heard mixed reviews. Can you give me the lowdown on whether it’s worth watching?”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on the upcoming project? I want to be prepared.”

8. Shoot the breeze

This phrase means to engage in casual or idle conversation. It is often used when people want to have a relaxed and informal chat without any specific topic or agenda.

  • For example, friends hanging out might say, “Let’s grab a drink and shoot the breeze.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might approach a group and say, “Mind if I join you and shoot the breeze?”
  • A coworker might suggest, “Instead of a formal meeting, let’s just shoot the breeze and brainstorm ideas.”

9. Tell it like it is

This phrase means to express the truth or facts without sugarcoating or being overly polite. It is often used when someone wants to emphasize the importance of being straightforward and honest.

  • For instance, during a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let’s not beat around the bush. Just tell it like it is.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, a friend might say, “I appreciate your honesty. You always tell it like it is.”
  • A manager might encourage their team by saying, “We need to address the issues head-on and tell it like it is.”

10. Dish the dirt

This phrase is used when someone wants to share juicy or scandalous information, particularly about someone else. It is often used in a playful or gossipy context.

  • For example, friends catching up might say, “Okay, dish the dirt. What’s been happening in your love life?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “Did you hear? The tabloids are dishing the dirt on that famous couple.”
  • A coworker might whisper, “I heard some interesting rumors. Let’s grab lunch and dish the dirt.”

11. Give me the scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide the most recent or up-to-date information on a particular topic. It is often used in a casual or informal setting.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey, give me the scoop on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a newsroom, a reporter might ask a colleague, “Can you give me the scoop on the new legislation?”
  • A gossip enthusiast might say, “I love hearing all the juicy scoops about celebrities.”

12. Open up

This phrase is used to encourage someone to be more open and honest about their thoughts, feelings, or experiences. It can be used in various contexts, such as during a conversation or therapy session.

  • For instance, a therapist might say, “I want you to open up and tell me how you’re really feeling.”
  • In a heart-to-heart conversation, a friend might say, “I’m here for you, so please open up and let me know what’s going on.”
  • During a team meeting, a manager might encourage their team members to open up and share any concerns or ideas they have.
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13. Let the cat out of the bag

This phrase is used to describe the act of unintentionally or intentionally revealing a secret or surprise that was meant to be kept hidden. It implies that the information was released prematurely or without authorization.

  • For example, if someone accidentally reveals a surprise party, they might say, “Oops, I let the cat out of the bag.”
  • In a mystery novel, a character might exclaim, “I can’t believe you let the cat out of the bag! Now the killer knows we’re onto them.”
  • A friend might playfully accuse another friend, “You let the cat out of the bag about my crush on John!”

14. Say your piece

This phrase is used to encourage someone to share their thoughts, opinions, or viewpoints on a particular matter. It implies that the person has the opportunity to speak freely and be heard.

  • For instance, during a group discussion, a facilitator might say, “Everyone will have a chance to say their piece.”
  • In a family meeting, a parent might say to their child, “Now it’s your turn to say your piece about the family vacation.”
  • During a debate, a debater might confidently state, “I’m ready to step up to the podium and say my piece.”

15. Lay down the law

This phrase is used to describe the act of setting strict rules or asserting one’s authority in a commanding manner. It implies that someone is taking charge and making sure others follow the rules.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “I’m going to lay down the law in this classroom.”
  • In a workplace, a manager might say, “It’s time to lay down the law and address the issue of tardiness.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I’m the parent, and it’s my job to lay down the law.”

16. Express yourself

This phrase encourages someone to freely communicate their thoughts or emotions without hesitation or reservation.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Don’t hold back, express yourself and let us know how you really feel.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “Art is a powerful way to express yourself and communicate ideas.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Don’t be afraid to express yourself and let your true self shine.”

17. Drop knowledge

To “drop knowledge” means to share valuable or insightful information with others, often in a casual or informal manner.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I’m going to drop some knowledge on you about the history of this subject.”
  • In a conversation about current events, someone might say, “I just read an interesting article, let me drop some knowledge on you.”
  • A podcast host might introduce their show by saying, “Welcome to our podcast, where we drop knowledge on a wide range of topics.”

18. Lay it on the line

This phrase encourages someone to speak honestly and directly without holding back or sugarcoating their thoughts or opinions.

  • For example, a manager might say to an employee, “I need you to lay it on the line and tell me what’s really going on.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important to lay it on the line and communicate openly with your partner.”
  • A friend seeking advice might ask, “Should I lay it on the line and tell them how I really feel?”

19. Pop off

To “pop off” means to speak or act in a sudden, aggressive, or confrontational manner, often in response to a provocation or disagreement.

  • For instance, during an argument, someone might say, “Don’t make me pop off and say something I’ll regret.”
  • In a discussion about sports, a fan might say, “If the referee makes another bad call, the coach is going to pop off.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “He’s known for his quick temper and tendency to pop off at the slightest provocation.”

20. Give the lowdown

To “give the lowdown” means to provide detailed information, the inside scoop, or the essential facts about a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I interviewed the CEO and got the lowdown on the company’s future plans.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “I heard from a reliable source that the food is amazing, let me give you the lowdown.”
  • A friend might say, “Before you meet them, let me give you the lowdown on what to expect from my family.”

21. Talk the talk

– For example, “If you want to be taken seriously in this industry, you have to talk the talk.”

  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Don’t just talk the talk, but also walk the walk.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience by saying, “Believe in yourself and talk the talk to achieve your goals.”

22. Air your grievances

– For instance, during a team meeting, an employee might say, “I would like to air my grievances about the new work schedule.”

  • In a relationship, a partner might encourage the other to “air your grievances and let’s work through them together.”
  • During a customer feedback session, a participant might say, “I appreciate the opportunity to air my grievances and provide suggestions for improvement.”

23. Voice your concerns

– For example, in a town hall meeting, a resident might say, “I would like to voice my concerns about the proposed construction project.”

  • In a workplace setting, an employee might approach their supervisor and say, “I need to voice my concerns about the recent changes in the company.”
  • During a community forum, a participant might stand up and say, “I want to voice my concerns about the lack of resources for mental health support.”

24. Share your two cents

– For instance, in a group discussion, someone might say, “I’d like to share my two cents on this issue.”

  • In a social media debate, a user might comment, “Here’s my two cents on the topic: “
  • During a family gathering, a relative might say, “Can I share my two cents about the upcoming family vacation?”

25. Lay it all out

– For example, in a therapy session, a patient might say, “I’m ready to lay it all out and address my deepest fears.”

  • In a business negotiation, a party might say, “Let’s lay it all out on the table and find a solution that works for both sides.”
  • During a personal conversation, a friend might say, “I trust you, so I’m going to lay it all out and share my true feelings.”

26. Voice your thoughts

This phrase encourages someone to openly share their thoughts or viewpoints in a discussion or conversation.

  • For example, during a team meeting, a manager might say, “Please feel free to voice your thoughts on this proposal.”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might ask, “Who would like to voice their thoughts on the topic we just discussed?”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “Don’t be afraid to voice your thoughts, your opinion matters.”

27. State your case

This phrase is often used in a formal or structured setting to request someone to provide their arguments or position on a particular matter.

  • For instance, during a debate, a moderator might say, “Now it’s time for you to state your case and present your arguments.”
  • In a court of law, a judge might ask a witness, “Can you state your case and explain your side of the story?”
  • A friend might say, “If you want me to understand your perspective, you need to state your case clearly.”

28. Let it be known

This phrase is used to emphasize the act of making something known or public, often with a sense of urgency or importance.

  • For example, a politician might declare, “I want to let it be known that I strongly oppose this new policy.”
  • In a social media post, someone might write, “Let it be known that I am officially starting my own business.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Let it be known that we expect you to be home by 10 PM tonight.”

29. Make yourself heard

This phrase encourages someone to take action to ensure that their voice or opinion is not ignored or overlooked.

  • For instance, during a group discussion, a facilitator might say, “Make yourself heard by speaking up and sharing your thoughts.”
  • In a workplace meeting, a manager might encourage their team by saying, “We need to make ourselves heard and advocate for our ideas.”
  • A friend might motivate another by saying, “Don’t be afraid to make yourself heard, your perspective is valuable.”

30. Sound off

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to speak up and express their thoughts or opinions.

  • For example, during a brainstorming session, a facilitator might say, “Everyone, please sound off and share your ideas.”
  • In a classroom discussion, a teacher might ask, “Who would like to sound off on this topic?”
  • A friend might say, “I want to hear your thoughts, so go ahead and sound off.”

31. Say it loud and proud

This phrase is used to encourage someone to confidently express their thoughts or opinions without holding back.

  • For example, a motivational speaker might say, “Don’t be afraid to say it loud and proud, let your voice be heard.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “If you have something to say, say it loud and proud, don’t be shy.”
  • In a discussion about self-expression, someone might say, “It’s important to say it loud and proud, be true to yourself.”

32. Declare

This term is often used when someone makes a formal or official statement about something.

  • For instance, a politician might declare their candidacy for an upcoming election.
  • In a courtroom, a witness might be asked to declare their name and occupation.
  • A person might declare their love for someone in a romantic setting.
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33. Tell all

This phrase is used when someone is encouraged to be completely honest and open about a certain topic or situation.

  • For example, a journalist might ask an interviewee to tell all about their experiences.
  • In a reality TV show, a contestant might be asked to tell all about their personal life.
  • A friend might say to another, “If you want to resolve this issue, you need to tell all and be honest.”

34. Let slip

This term is used when someone unintentionally reveals information or says something they didn’t mean to say.

  • For instance, during a surprise party, someone might let slip the secret to the guest of honor.
  • In a conversation, someone might let slip a confidential detail without realizing it.
  • A friend might tease another by saying, “Oops, looks like you let slip that you have a crush on someone.”

35. Leak

This term is often used in reference to the unauthorized release of confidential or secret information to the public.

  • For example, a whistleblower might leak classified documents to expose wrongdoing.
  • In the world of journalism, a news outlet might publish leaked information about a high-profile scandal.
  • A government official might be investigated for leaking sensitive information to the media.

36. Blab

Blabbing refers to the act of sharing information that was meant to be kept private or confidential. It often implies a sense of betrayal or breaking trust.

  • For example, “I trusted him with my secret, but he blabbed it to everyone.”
  • In a gossip-filled conversation, someone might say, “You better not blab about this to anyone.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “If you blab about the surprise party, it won’t be a surprise anymore.”

37. Rat out

To rat out means to betray someone by reporting their actions to an authority figure or revealing their secrets or wrongdoings.

  • For instance, “He ratted out his friends to avoid getting in trouble.”
  • In a crime context, someone might say, “If you rat me out, I’ll make sure you regret it.”
  • A person might confess, “I’m not the type to rat out my friends for minor mistakes.”

38. Fill in

To fill in means to provide missing or additional information to someone who is not fully informed about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you fill me in on what happened while I was away?”
  • In a team meeting, a colleague might say, “I’ll fill you in on the details of the project.”
  • Someone might ask, “Could you fill me in on the latest gossip?”

39. Break the news

Breaking the news refers to the act of sharing important or significant information with someone, often involving delivering news that may be surprising, shocking, or life-changing.

  • For instance, “I had to break the news to her that she didn’t get the job.”
  • In a family setting, someone might say, “I’ll let you break the news to Dad about the broken vase.”
  • A doctor might say, “I’m sorry to be the one to break the news, but the test results came back positive.”

40. Share the 411

Sharing the 411 means to provide information, news, or updates on a particular topic or situation. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context.

  • For example, “Hey, share the 411 on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a conversation about a TV show, someone might say, “I’ll share the 411 on the latest episode.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you share the 411 on the new restaurant in town?”

41. Pass on

To choose not to participate in or accept something.

  • For example, if someone offers you a slice of cake but you’re on a diet, you might say, “I’ll pass on dessert.”
  • In a group setting, if someone suggests going to a movie that you’re not interested in, you could say, “I think I’ll pass on that one.”
  • If a friend invites you to a party, but you don’t feel like going, you might say, “Thanks for the invite, but I’ll pass on this one.”

42. Drop a line

To reach out to someone, usually through a written or electronic message.

  • For instance, if you haven’t talked to a friend in a while, you might say, “I should drop her a line and see how she’s doing.”
  • If you want to ask someone out on a date, you could say, “I’m going to drop him a line and see if he’s free this weekend.”
  • Instead of calling, you might decide to drop a line to a family member to let them know you’re thinking of them.
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43. Spill it

To share information or reveal something that was previously unknown or hidden.

  • For example, if someone is keeping a secret, you might say, “Come on, spill it! What’s going on?”
  • If a friend is holding back details about a recent trip, you could say, “Don’t hold back, spill it! I want to hear all about it.”
  • When someone is being evasive in a conversation, you might say, “Quit beating around the bush and just spill it already!”

44. Let on

To disclose or reveal something, often a piece of information or a secret.

  • For instance, if you accidentally reveal a surprise party, you might say, “Oops, I let on about the surprise. Sorry!”
  • If someone is trying to keep their true feelings hidden, you might say, “I can tell by the look on your face that you’re letting on more than you realize.”
  • When someone hints at something but doesn’t fully explain, you could say, “Don’t just tease, let on and tell us what you’re talking about!”

45. Give the scoop

To share the latest news or information about a particular topic.

  • For example, if someone asks about a recent event, you might say, “Let me give you the scoop on what happened.”
  • When someone is curious about a celebrity’s personal life, you could say, “I can give you the scoop on their rumored relationship.”
  • If someone is out of the loop and wants to catch up on gossip, you might say, “Sit down, and I’ll give you the scoop on everyone’s drama.”

46. Give the word

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or share their thoughts on a particular topic. It implies that the person has knowledge or insight that others are seeking.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a recent event, they might say, “Hey, give the word on what happened.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might ask, “Can you give the word on the latest updates?”
  • A friend might say, “Give the word on your new job. How’s it going?”

47. Drop the news

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to share or reveal news or information that they have. It implies that the person has exclusive or important information.

  • For instance, if someone is gossiping about a celebrity, they might say, “Come on, drop the news. What’s the latest gossip?”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s life, someone might ask, “Did she drop the news about her engagement yet?”
  • A coworker might say, “Drop the news about the new project. I heard there are some exciting updates.”