Top 53 Slang For Scheduled – Meaning & Usage

Scheduled slang is all the rage these days, with new terms popping up faster than you can say “appointment”. From setting up plans with friends to organizing your day, we’ve got you covered with a list of the trendiest and most useful slang for all things scheduled. Stay ahead of the curve and brush up on your lingo with our handy guide.

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1. Booked

When someone says they are “booked,” it means that their schedule is completely full and they have no availability.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re free for dinner, you might respond, “Sorry, I’m booked tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t make it to the party, I’m already booked for another event.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “I’m booked with meetings all day, can we reschedule?”

2. Locked in

When something is “locked in,” it means that it has been confirmed and cannot be changed or canceled.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re still available for a meeting, you might respond, “Yes, I’m locked in.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve locked in my vacation dates, so I won’t be able to attend the conference.”
  • In a sports context, a team might announce, “We have locked in our starting lineup for the game.”

3. Set in stone

When something is “set in stone,” it means that it is definitely scheduled and cannot be changed or altered.

  • For example, if someone asks if a plan is final, you might respond, “Yes, it’s set in stone.”
  • A person might say, “The wedding date is set in stone, so we can’t make any changes.”
  • In a business context, a manager might declare, “The project deadline is set in stone, so we need to meet it.”

4. Penciled in

When something is “penciled in,” it means that it is provisionally scheduled but still subject to change or confirmation.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re available for a meeting, you might respond, “I’m penciled in, but I’ll let you know for sure.”
  • A person might say, “I have a penciled-in appointment with the doctor, but I need to confirm the time.”
  • In a social setting, a friend might suggest, “Let’s pencil in a dinner date for next week.”

5. Slated

When something is “slated,” it means that it is scheduled or planned to happen at a specific time or date.

  • For example, if someone asks when a movie will be released, you might respond, “It’s slated to come out next month.”
  • A person might say, “The concert is slated to start at 8 PM, so make sure to arrive on time.”
  • In a project management context, a team leader might announce, “The next phase of the project is slated to begin next week.”

6. Arranged

This term refers to something that has been planned or organized in advance. It implies that the necessary steps have been taken to ensure that the event or activity will happen as scheduled.

  • For example, “We have an arranged meeting with the client tomorrow.”
  • Someone might say, “I have an arranged date with my crush this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, a person might mention, “I already have my arranged flights and accommodations for my vacation.”

7. Fixed up

When something is “fixed up,” it means that it has been arranged or organized in a specific way. The term suggests that the necessary preparations have been made to ensure that everything is in order.

  • For instance, “The party is fixed up with decorations, food, and entertainment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting my fixed-up schedule for the week ready.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might mention, “I need to get everything fixed up before the deadline.”

8. Lined up

This term refers to something that has been planned or scheduled in advance. It suggests that the necessary arrangements have been made to ensure that the event or activity will happen as planned.

  • For example, “I have a lined-up series of meetings tomorrow.”
  • Someone might say, “I already have my lined-up appointments for the day.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming events, a person might mention, “I have a lined-up concert and a lined-up movie premiere to attend this weekend.”

9. Timetabled

When something is “timetabled,” it means that it has been assigned a specific time or schedule. The term implies that the activity or event has been organized and allocated a specific time slot.

  • For instance, “The classes are timetabled from 9 AM to 5 PM.”
  • A person might say, “I have my timetabled work hours for the week.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might mention, “We need to make sure all the tasks are timetabled properly.”

10. Marked down

When something is “marked down,” it means that it has been recorded or noted in a specific way. The term suggests that the relevant information or details have been documented for future reference.

  • For example, “I have marked down the important dates in my calendar.”
  • Someone might say, “I always make sure to mark down any changes or updates.”
  • In a discussion about a schedule, a person might mention, “I have marked down all the upcoming deadlines in my planner.”

11. Plotted

When something is “plotted,” it means that it has been planned or scheduled in advance. This term is often used to describe events or activities that have been carefully organized and arranged on a timeline.

  • For example, “The conference has been plotted for next month.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve plotted out my entire week with meetings and appointments.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might mention, “I’ve plotted my itinerary for my upcoming trip.”

12. Organized

When something is “organized,” it means that it has been arranged or planned in a structured manner. This term is often used to describe events, tasks, or activities that have been carefully coordinated and scheduled.

  • For instance, “The conference is well-organized with a detailed agenda.”
  • A person might say, “I need to get organized and make a to-do list.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might mention, “I’ve organized my day into specific time blocks for maximum productivity.”

13. Programmed

When something is “programmed,” it means that it has been scheduled or arranged according to a set plan or schedule. This term is often used in the context of technology, but can also be applied to other areas where tasks or events are scheduled systematically.

  • For example, “The software update is programmed to occur automatically.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve programmed my alarm to wake me up at 7 AM.”
  • In a discussion about a conference, someone might mention, “The sessions are programmed to run back-to-back throughout the day.”

14. Listed

When something is “listed,” it means that it has been included or recorded on a schedule or agenda. This term is often used to describe events, tasks, or activities that have been documented and included in a list or plan.

  • For instance, “The meeting is listed on the company’s calendar.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve listed all the items I need to buy at the grocery store.”
  • In a discussion about a music festival, someone might mention, “The band is listed as one of the performers.”

15. Charted

When something is “charted,” it means that it has been planned, scheduled, and recorded on a chart or graph. This term is often used in the context of data analysis or project management, where information is visually represented for easier understanding.

  • For example, “The progress of the project is charted on a timeline.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve charted my expenses for the month to track my budget.”
  • In a discussion about sales performance, someone might mention, “The increase in revenue is charted on the graph.”

16. Reserved

When something is “reserved,” it means that it has been set aside or saved for a specific purpose or time. It often refers to making arrangements or securing something in advance.

  • For example, “I have reserved a table at the restaurant for our anniversary dinner.”
  • In a hotel, a guest might say, “I have reserved a room for two nights.”
  • A person might mention, “I have reserved tickets for the concert next week.”

17. Agreed upon

When something is “agreed upon,” it means that a decision or arrangement has been reached by consensus or mutual understanding. It implies that all parties involved have come to an agreement.

  • For instance, “We have agreed upon the terms of the contract.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “We have finally agreed upon a date for the event.”
  • A team member might mention, “We have agreed upon the project timeline.”

18. Decided

When something is “decided,” it means that a choice or course of action has been made. It suggests that a firm decision has been reached and is not likely to change.

  • For example, “We have decided on the location for our vacation.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “We have decided on the theme for the party.”
  • A person might mention, “We have decided on a name for our new company.”

19. Confirmed

When something is “confirmed,” it means that it has been verified or made certain. It implies that plans or arrangements have been finalized and are definite.

  • For instance, “I have confirmed my attendance at the meeting.”
  • When discussing travel plans, someone might say, “I have confirmed my flight and hotel reservations.”
  • A person might mention, “I have confirmed the date and time for our appointment.”

20. Planned out

When something is “planned out,” it means that it has been carefully thought through and organized in advance. It suggests that a detailed plan or strategy has been created.

  • For example, “I have planned out the itinerary for our road trip.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I have planned out the marketing campaign for the next quarter.”
  • A person might mention, “I have planned out the steps for completing the project.”

21. On the diary

When something is “on the diary,” it means that it is planned or scheduled to happen. The phrase is often used to refer to events or activities that have been added to a personal or professional calendar.

  • For example, “I have a meeting with my boss on the diary for tomorrow.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s put our team lunch on the diary for next week.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the conference call on the diary for this afternoon?”

22. On the appointment book

When something is “on the appointment book,” it means that it is scheduled or planned. The term is often used in professional contexts, where appointments and meetings are recorded in a physical or digital appointment book.

  • For instance, “I have a client meeting on the appointment book for tomorrow.”
  • A doctor might say, “Let’s fit you in on the appointment book for next week.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is the team briefing on the appointment book for this morning?”

23. On the to-do list

When something is “on the to-do list,” it means that it is a scheduled or planned task. The phrase is commonly used to refer to tasks or activities that need to be completed within a certain timeframe.

  • For example, “I have a few important items on the to-do list for today.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s add that task to the to-do list for next week.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is the report on the to-do list for this month?”

24. On the program

When something is “on the program,” it means that it is scheduled or planned to happen. The term is often used in the context of events, performances, or activities that have been organized or arranged.

  • For instance, “We have a guest speaker on the program for tomorrow’s conference.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s include a live band on the program for the wedding.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is the award ceremony on the program for tonight?”

25. On the list

When something is “on the list,” it means that it is scheduled or planned to happen. The phrase is commonly used to refer to tasks, events, or activities that have been included or recorded on a specific list.

  • For example, “I have a few important items on the list for today.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s put that task on the list for next week.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is the meeting on the list for this morning?”

26. On the chart

This phrase is used to indicate that something is on the schedule or plan. It suggests that the event or activity has been organized and is expected to happen.

  • For example, “The meeting is on the chart for tomorrow afternoon.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming events, someone might say, “The concert is on the chart for next month.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the project on the chart for completion this week?”

27. On the grid

This slang phrase is used to indicate that something is on the schedule or plan. It suggests that the event or activity has been organized and is expected to happen.

  • For instance, “The game is on the grid for Saturday.”
  • In a conversation about work assignments, someone might say, “I’m on the grid for a presentation next week.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the project on the grid for completion by the deadline?”

28. On the lineup

This phrase is used to indicate that something is on the schedule or plan. It suggests that the event or activity has been organized and is expected to happen.

  • For example, “The band is on the lineup for the music festival.”
  • In a discussion about a conference, someone might say, “The keynote speaker is on the lineup for the opening session.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the meeting on the lineup for today?”

29. On the plan

This phrase is used to indicate that something is on the schedule or plan. It suggests that the event or activity has been organized and is expected to happen.

  • For instance, “The trip is on the plan for next month.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “The presentation is on the plan for tomorrow.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the event on the plan for this weekend?”

30. On the scheme

This slang phrase is used to indicate that something is on the schedule or plan. It suggests that the event or activity has been organized and is expected to happen.

  • For example, “The party is on the scheme for Friday night.”
  • In a discussion about a trip, someone might say, “The sightseeing tour is on the scheme for tomorrow.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the event on the scheme for next week?”

31. On the scheme of things

This phrase refers to considering something in the context of the bigger picture or overall situation.

  • For example, “On the scheme of things, this minor setback is just a blip.”
  • When discussing long-term goals, one might say, “We need to focus on the scheme of things and not get caught up in small details.”
  • A person reflecting on their life might say, “I’ve come to realize that, on the scheme of things, material possessions don’t bring true happiness.”

32. On the order of the day

This phrase refers to what is currently happening or what is being emphasized or prioritized.

  • For instance, “On the order of the day, we need to address the issue of climate change.”
  • In a meeting agenda, one might see, “Discussion on the order of the day: budget allocation.”
  • A person commenting on a social trend might say, “Self-care seems to be on the order of the day these days.”

33. On the scheme of events

This phrase refers to considering something in relation to the chronological order of events.

  • For example, “On the scheme of events, this incident occurred after the initial conflict.”
  • When analyzing historical events, one might say, “It’s important to understand the scheme of events that led to this outcome.”
  • A person reflecting on their personal journey might say, “On the scheme of events, I can see how each decision shaped my path.”

34. On the plan of action

This phrase refers to following a specific plan or strategy.

  • For instance, “On the plan of action, we need to execute Phase 2 of the project.”
  • In a military operation, one might say, “Soldiers are trained to act on the plan of action without hesitation.”
  • A person discussing their career goals might say, “I’m currently on the plan of action to become a manager within the next two years.”

35. Prearranged

This term refers to something that has been organized or agreed upon beforehand.

  • For example, “The meeting was prearranged to discuss the upcoming project.”
  • When talking about a surprise party, one might say, “The decorations and guest list were all prearranged.”
  • A person discussing their travel plans might say, “I have a prearranged itinerary for my trip to Europe.”

36. Synchronized

This term refers to something that is planned or coordinated to happen at the same time as something else.

  • For example, “Let’s make sure our schedules are synchronized for the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “We need to be synchronized in our movements to execute this dance routine.”
  • In a discussion about event planning, someone might mention, “The performances need to be synchronized with the lighting and music.”

37. Diarized

To diarize something means to write it down in a diary or schedule. It implies that an event or task has been officially recorded.

  • For instance, “I’ve diarized our meeting for next Tuesday.”
  • A person might say, “I diarized all my appointments for the week to stay organized.”
  • In a conversation about time management, someone might mention, “Diarizing tasks helps me stay on top of my responsibilities.”

38. Preplanned

This term refers to something that has been carefully thought out and organized ahead of time.

  • For example, “The preplanned itinerary ensured a smooth trip.”
  • A person might say, “We need to have a preplanned strategy before entering the negotiation.”
  • In a discussion about event management, someone might mention, “A preplanned schedule is crucial for a successful conference.”

39. Arrived

In the context of slang for “scheduled,” this term means that something is on track and happening as planned.

  • For instance, “The project has arrived on schedule.”
  • A person might say, “I’m glad the train arrived on time.”
  • In a conversation about deadlines, someone might mention, “The report needs to arrive by the end of the week.”

40. Noted

When used as slang for “scheduled,” this term implies that something has been acknowledged and recorded for future reference.

  • For example, “I’ve noted the date and time of the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “Your request has been noted and will be addressed.”
  • In a discussion about reminders, someone might mention, “I always have a notepad handy to note down important tasks.”

41. Filed

This term refers to an event or task being officially recorded and scheduled. It can also imply that something has been submitted or documented.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “I just filed a meeting request for next week.”
  • In a discussion about paperwork, someone might mention, “Make sure you file your expense reports on time.”
  • A manager might ask, “Have you filed the necessary documents for the project?”

42. Logged

When something is logged, it means that it has been recorded or documented. This term can be used to indicate that an event or action has been noted or entered into a system.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “Please log your hours for the day.”
  • In a conversation about troubleshooting, someone might suggest, “Let’s log the error messages to help identify the issue.”
  • A user might ask, “Can you log my request for technical support?”

43. Established

When something is established, it means that it has been set up or created. This term can be used to indicate that a schedule or plan has been put in place.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “We have established a timeline for the project.”
  • In a discussion about a new business, someone might mention, “The company was established in 2005.”
  • A team leader might ask, “Have we established the meeting agenda?”

44. Timed

This term refers to an event or action being planned to happen at a particular time. It can imply that something has been carefully arranged to fit within a schedule.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “The test is timed, so make sure you manage your time wisely.”
  • In a conversation about a race, someone might mention, “Each runner will be timed to determine their finishing position.”
  • A coordinator might ask, “Have we timed the presentations to ensure they fit within the allotted slot?”

45. Regulated

When something is regulated, it means that it is controlled and monitored according to specific rules or guidelines. This term can be used to indicate that a schedule or process is closely managed.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “We have regulated break times to ensure productivity.”
  • In a discussion about a transportation system, someone might mention, “The buses run on a regulated schedule.”
  • A project manager might ask, “Are we following the regulated procedures for quality control?”

46. Systematized

This term refers to something that is organized or arranged according to a set schedule or system. It implies that there is a methodical approach to scheduling and planning.

  • For example, “Our team has a systematized approach to project deadlines.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “I find it helpful to have a systematized routine for my daily tasks.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to implement a systematized process for employee scheduling.”

47. Coordinated

When something is coordinated, it means that it has been planned and arranged in advance. It implies that different elements or individuals have been brought together to work in a synchronized manner.

  • For instance, “The event was well-coordinated, with each team member knowing their role.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “I’ve coordinated my flights and accommodations for the trip.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to ensure that all tasks are coordinated to meet the deadline.”

48. Fixed

When something is fixed, it means that it is firmly established and unchanging. In the context of scheduling, it refers to something that is set and cannot be altered or rescheduled.

  • For example, “The meeting time is fixed and cannot be changed.”
  • In a discussion about event planning, someone might say, “We have a fixed date for the conference.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “The deadline for the assignment is fixed, so make sure to submit it on time.”

49. Prepared

Being prepared means being ready and organized for a specific task or event. In the context of scheduling, it implies that all necessary arrangements and preparations have been made.

  • For instance, “I’m fully prepared for the presentation tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I’ve packed my bags and I’m prepared for the trip.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Make sure you’re mentally and physically prepared for the game.”

50. Determined

When something is determined, it means that it has been decided or set in advance. In the context of scheduling, it implies that a specific time or plan has been established.

  • For example, “The date for the event has been determined.”
  • In a discussion about project timelines, someone might say, “We have determined the milestones and deadlines.”
  • A supervisor might tell their employees, “The work schedule for next week has been determined, so please plan accordingly.”

51. Agreed

This term is used to indicate that two or more parties have come to an agreement or are in agreement about something. It suggests that everyone involved is on the same page and understands and accepts the plan or decision.

  • For example, in a group chat discussing plans for a party, someone might say, “So we’re meeting at 7 pm, right? Agreed?”
  • In a business meeting, a team member might say, “I think we should go with option B. Is everyone agreed?”
  • When making plans with a friend, you might say, “Let’s meet at the coffee shop tomorrow morning, agreed?”

52. Sorted out

This phrase means to resolve or solve a problem or issue. It suggests that the situation has been addressed and resolved in a satisfactory manner.

  • For instance, if two friends are trying to decide on a restaurant for dinner, one might say, “I’ll look up some options and we can sort it out later.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “There was a mix-up with the files, but I managed to sort it out.”
  • When discussing a disagreement with a partner, you might say, “We had a disagreement, but we talked it out and sorted things out.”

53. Scheduled

This term means that something has been planned or arranged to take place at a specific time. It suggests that the event or activity has been put on a schedule.

  • For example, if someone asks about a meeting, you might say, “Yes, it’s scheduled for tomorrow at 2 pm.”
  • When discussing travel plans, you might say, “I have a flight scheduled for next week.”
  • In a work context, a manager might say, “Please make sure you have all your tasks scheduled for the week.”
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