Top 46 Slang For Scrutinize – Meaning & Usage

Scrutinize is a term that’s often used in everyday conversations, but do you know the cool and trendy slang words that can replace it? Our team at Fluentslang has done the hard work for you, gathering the top slang terms for scrutinize that will make you feel in the know and up to date with the latest language trends. So, if you’re ready to spice up your vocabulary and impress your friends, keep reading to discover the fresh ways to express scrutiny in style!

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1. Scope out

To “scope out” means to observe or examine something or someone closely. It is often used when trying to gather information or assess a situation.

  • For example, “I’m going to scope out the competition before the big game.”
  • In a discussion about finding a new apartment, someone might say, “Let’s scope out the neighborhood before making a decision.”
  • A detective might use the phrase, “I’ll scope out the scene of the crime for any clues.”

2. Eye up

To “eye up” means to look at someone or something with interest or desire. It suggests a visual examination with a particular focus on attraction or scrutiny.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t help but eye up the new car in the showroom.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I’m always eyeing up the latest trends.”
  • A person discussing potential romantic partners might say, “I like to eye up the crowd at parties.”

3. Check out

To “check out” means to take a look at something or someone. It is a casual way to express interest or curiosity.

  • For example, “I’m going to check out that new restaurant everyone is talking about.”
  • In a discussion about a new movie, someone might say, “Let’s check out the trailer before deciding to watch it.”
  • A person shopping for clothes might say, “I need to check out the sales before making a purchase.”

4. Size up

To “size up” means to assess or evaluate someone or something, usually to determine their worth, value, or potential.

  • For instance, “He quickly sized up the competition and knew he had a good chance of winning.”
  • In a conversation about job candidates, someone might say, “We need to size up their qualifications before making a decision.”
  • A person discussing a new business opportunity might say, “I’m going to size up the market before investing.”

5. Look into

To “look into” means to investigate or examine something more closely. It suggests a deeper level of scrutiny or research.

  • For example, “The police are going to look into the matter and gather more evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a potential investment, someone might say, “I need to look into the company’s financials before making a decision.”
  • A person researching a topic might say, “I’m going to look into the history of that ancient civilization.”

6. Give the once-over

To give something a quick inspection or examination. The term suggests a brief and casual evaluation rather than a thorough scrutiny.

  • For example, “Before the job interview, I gave my resume the once-over to make sure there were no typos.”
  • In a clothing store, a shopper might say, “I’ll just give this dress the once-over to see if it’s worth trying on.”
  • A detective might say, “I’ll give the crime scene the once-over to see if anything stands out.”

7. Take a gander

To take a quick look or glance at something. The term “gander” refers to a quick, casual observation.

  • For instance, “Let me take a gander at that document to see if I can find the information you need.”
  • A person might say, “I took a gander at the menu and decided what to order.”
  • In a museum, a visitor might say, “I’ll take a gander at the paintings before moving on to the sculptures.”

8. Watch like a hawk

To closely monitor or observe something or someone. The term “like a hawk” suggests a vigilant and intense level of scrutiny.

  • For example, “The security guard watched the surveillance footage like a hawk, looking for any suspicious activity.”
  • A parent might say, “I’m going to watch you like a hawk until you finish your homework.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might say, “Keep an eye on the opposing team’s star player and watch him like a hawk.”

9. Go over with a fine-tooth comb

To carefully and meticulously examine something in great detail. The term “fine-tooth comb” refers to a comb with closely spaced teeth, suggesting a meticulous and thorough inspection.

  • For instance, “Before submitting the report, I went over it with a fine-tooth comb to catch any errors.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’ll go over your essay with a fine-tooth comb to provide detailed feedback.”
  • In a forensic investigation, an analyst might say, “We need to go over the evidence with a fine-tooth comb to find any clues.”

10. Dig into

To investigate or examine something deeply or thoroughly. The term “dig” suggests a metaphorical act of digging to uncover information or insights.

  • For example, “I need to dig into this research topic to find more supporting evidence.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m going to dig into this story and uncover the truth.”
  • In a business meeting, a participant might say, “Let’s dig into the data to understand the underlying trends.”

11. Pore over

To examine or analyze something in great detail or with great attention. “Pore over” is often used to describe the act of studying or reviewing information thoroughly.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to pore over my notes before the exam.”
  • A researcher might explain, “I spent hours poring over scientific articles to gather data for my study.”
  • In a book club discussion, someone might comment, “I really enjoyed poring over the details of the author’s writing style.”

12. Delve into

To investigate or explore a subject or topic in depth. “Delve into” implies a thorough examination or exploration, often with the intention of gaining deeper knowledge or understanding.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I’m going to delve into the details of this story to uncover the truth.”
  • A historian might explain, “I spent years delving into archives and primary sources to write my book.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might suggest, “Let’s delve into the different factors that contribute to this problem.”

13. Suss out

To deduce or determine something through careful observation or investigation. “Suss out” is often used when trying to understand or uncover hidden or unclear information.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I need to suss out who the real culprit is.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you suss out if they’re telling the truth?”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s suss out the best strategy for increasing sales.”

14. Examine closely

To closely inspect or scrutinize something with great attention to detail. “Examine closely” implies a careful and thorough examination of an object, situation, or information.

  • For instance, a jeweler might say, “I need to examine this diamond closely to determine its quality.”
  • A scientist might explain, “We will examine the data closely to identify any patterns or anomalies.”
  • In a discussion about a work of art, someone might comment, “Take a moment to examine the brushstrokes closely and appreciate the artist’s technique.”

15. Investigate thoroughly

To conduct a comprehensive investigation or inquiry into a matter. “Investigate thoroughly” suggests a systematic and rigorous examination of facts, evidence, or information.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to investigate this crime thoroughly to find the culprit.”
  • A journalist might explain, “I spent months investigating this story, conducting interviews and reviewing documents.”
  • In a legal case, someone might comment, “The defense attorney will investigate the evidence thoroughly to build their case.”

16. Analyze

This term refers to the process of examining something in detail to understand its components, structure, and function. It often involves studying data, conducting research, and drawing conclusions based on the findings.

  • For example, a scientist might analyze the results of an experiment to determine its validity.
  • In a business context, one might analyze market trends to make informed decisions.
  • A student might analyze a poem to understand its deeper meaning.
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17. Inspect closely

When you inspect something closely, you carefully examine it to observe and assess its details, condition, or quality. It involves paying close attention to specific aspects or features.

  • For instance, a mechanic might inspect an engine to identify any issues or defects.
  • A detective might inspect a crime scene for evidence.
  • A teacher might inspect a student’s work to provide feedback and guidance.

18. Study closely

To study something closely means to examine it in great detail, often with the intention of gaining knowledge or understanding. It involves dedicating time and effort to comprehensively explore a subject.

  • For example, a researcher might study closely the behavior of a particular species.
  • A student might study closely a complex mathematical concept to fully grasp its principles.
  • A historian might study closely historical documents to uncover new information.

19. Probe into

When you probe into something, you investigate it deeply and extensively. It involves asking probing questions, conducting research, and seeking answers to uncover hidden or unknown information.

  • For instance, a journalist might probe into a scandal to uncover the truth.
  • A lawyer might probe into a witness’s testimony to find inconsistencies.
  • A scientist might probe into the mysteries of the universe to unravel its secrets.

20. Look at closely

To look at something closely means to observe it with great attention and focus. It involves carefully examining the details and features of an object, person, or situation.

  • For example, an art critic might look at a painting closely to analyze its technique and symbolism.
  • A doctor might look at a patient’s medical records closely to make an accurate diagnosis.
  • A photographer might look at a scene closely to capture the perfect shot.

21. Scrutinize closely

This phrase means to carefully analyze or inspect something with great attention to detail. It implies a thorough and careful examination.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to scrutinize the crime scene closely for any clues.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We should scrutinize the financial reports closely to identify any discrepancies.”
  • A teacher might advise students, “Make sure to scrutinize the exam questions closely before answering.”

22. Watch closely

This phrase means to observe or monitor something with close attention or vigilance. It implies a continuous and careful observation.

  • For instance, a coach might say to a player, “Watch closely for any opportunities to score.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’ll be watching closely to see if you’re behaving.”
  • In a surveillance context, an investigator might say, “We need to watch closely for any suspicious activity.”

23. Monitor closely

This phrase means to observe or track something with close attention or supervision. It implies a continuous and systematic monitoring.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to monitor the patient’s vital signs closely.”
  • In a project management context, a team leader might say, “We should monitor the progress closely to ensure we meet the deadline.”
  • A supervisor might tell an employee, “I’ll be monitoring your work closely to ensure quality.”

This phrase means to carefully and exhaustively search or investigate something. It implies a comprehensive and meticulous search.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need to search the area thoroughly for any evidence.”
  • In a research context, a scientist might say, “We should search the literature thoroughly for relevant studies.”
  • A teacher might instruct students, “Make sure to search the library catalog thoroughly for the required books.”

25. Keep an eye on

This phrase means to observe or monitor something with attention or vigilance. It implies a continuous and cautious observation.

  • For example, a babysitter might say, “I’ll keep an eye on the kids while you’re away.”
  • A supervisor might tell an employee, “Keep an eye on the clock and make sure to finish the task on time.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you keep an eye on my bag while I go to the restroom?”

26. Give a going-over

To give something a going-over means to thoroughly examine or inspect it. This phrase suggests a careful and detailed scrutiny of the subject.

  • For example, “Before submitting the report, give it a going-over to catch any errors.”
  • A manager might say, “I need you to give this project proposal a going-over and provide feedback.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you give my resume a going-over to make sure it’s polished?”

27. Cast a critical eye

To cast a critical eye means to analyze something closely and critically. This phrase implies a careful examination with a discerning and judgmental perspective.

  • For instance, “Before making a decision, cast a critical eye on all the available options.”
  • A film critic might say, “I watched the movie and cast a critical eye on its plot, acting, and cinematography.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Cast a critical eye on your essay to check for logical inconsistencies.”

28. Poke around

To poke around means to investigate or explore something casually or without a specific purpose. This phrase suggests a less formal or thorough scrutiny, often driven by curiosity.

  • For example, “I decided to poke around the old attic to see if I could find any hidden treasures.”
  • A detective might say, “I need to poke around the crime scene to gather more evidence.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can I poke around your book collection? I’m looking for a new read.”

29. Go through with a fine-tooth comb

To go through with a fine-tooth comb means to examine something meticulously or in great detail. This phrase implies a thorough and careful scrutiny, leaving no stone unturned.

  • For instance, “Before submitting the report, go through it with a fine-tooth comb to ensure accuracy.”
  • A researcher might say, “I need to go through these documents with a fine-tooth comb to find the relevant information.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’m going to go through your room with a fine-tooth comb to find that missing toy.”

30. Look over

To look over something means to review or examine it briefly or casually. This phrase suggests a quick and cursory scrutiny, often to get a general idea or assess the overall condition.

  • For example, “Before the meeting, take a few minutes to look over the agenda.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’ll look over your homework tonight and provide feedback tomorrow.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you look over my resume and let me know if there are any glaring mistakes?”

31. Pick apart

To closely examine or analyze something, often with the intention of finding faults or flaws.

  • For example, a film critic might say, “I’m going to pick apart every scene of this movie to see if it holds up.”
  • In a debate, one person might say, “Let’s pick apart their argument and find the weaknesses.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “I want you to pick apart this poem and analyze its meaning.”

32. Inspect

To carefully examine or scrutinize something in order to assess its quality, condition, or accuracy.

  • For instance, a mechanic might say, “I need to inspect the engine to determine the source of the problem.”
  • A health inspector might inspect a restaurant to ensure it meets safety standards.
  • In a detective story, a character might inspect a crime scene for clues.
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33. Review

To evaluate or assess something, often with the intention of providing feedback or making a judgment.

  • For example, a book reviewer might say, “I’m going to review this novel and share my thoughts.”
  • A manager might review an employee’s performance and provide constructive criticism.
  • In the world of gaming, a reviewer might write a review of a new video game.

34. Study

To examine or analyze something in depth, often with the intention of gaining knowledge or understanding.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to study this textbook to prepare for the exam.”
  • A scientist might study a new species to learn more about its behavior and habitat.
  • In a business setting, a market researcher might study consumer behavior to identify trends.

35. Monitor

To keep a close watch or observation on something, often to track its progress or ensure its proper functioning.

  • For example, a doctor might monitor a patient’s vital signs during surgery.
  • A supervisor might monitor employees’ work to ensure productivity and quality.
  • In the world of technology, a system administrator might monitor network traffic to detect any abnormalities.

36. Survey

To survey is to examine or inspect something carefully or thoroughly. It often involves gathering information or opinions through questioning or observation.

  • For example, a company might conduct a survey to gather feedback from customers.
  • A researcher might survey a sample of the population to gather data for a study.
  • In a discussion about public opinion, someone might say, “According to a recent survey, 75% of respondents support the new policy.”

37. Probe

To probe is to investigate or explore something in a thorough and systematic way. It often involves asking questions or seeking information in order to gain a deeper understanding.

  • For instance, a journalist might probe a source for more information on a story.
  • In a criminal investigation, detectives might probe a suspect for clues or evidence.
  • In a scientific experiment, researchers might probe a hypothesis to test its validity.
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38. Investigate

To investigate is to carefully examine or inquire into something in order to uncover facts or information. It often involves gathering evidence or conducting research.

  • For example, a detective might investigate a crime to gather evidence and identify a suspect.
  • A journalist might investigate a story to uncover the truth and report it to the public.
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We need to investigate further before drawing any conclusions.”

39. Scan

To scan is to quickly examine or look over something in order to identify or locate specific information or details. It often involves a quick visual or electronic search.

  • For instance, a reader might scan a document to find a specific piece of information.
  • In a security check, a guard might scan a person’s identification card.
  • In a discussion about medical tests, someone might say, “The doctor will scan your body to look for any abnormalities.”

To search is to carefully look for or seek something in order to find or discover it. It often involves a systematic exploration or examination.

  • For example, a person might search their house for their lost keys.
  • In a criminal investigation, police might search a suspect’s home for evidence.
  • In a discussion about finding information online, someone might say, “I’ll search the internet for more details.”

41. Explore

To thoroughly examine or investigate something. “Explore” is a word commonly used to describe the act of scrutinizing and analyzing a subject or idea.

  • For example, a researcher might say, “I need to explore the data to find any patterns or trends.”
  • In a creative writing class, a teacher might encourage students to “explore different themes and motifs in their stories.”
  • A traveler might share, “I love to explore new cultures and immerse myself in their traditions.”

42. Peer into

To look closely or attentively at something. “Peer into” is a phrase that conveys the act of scrutinizing or examining with curiosity.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “I need to peer into the suspect’s background to find any clues.”
  • A person observing a painting might comment, “Let’s peer into the details and see what the artist intended.”
  • A curious child might ask, “Can I peer into the microscope and see the tiny organisms?”

43. Sift through

To carefully examine or search through a collection of items or information. “Sift through” implies the act of scrutinizing and evaluating each item or piece of information.

  • For example, a librarian might say, “I need to sift through the books to find the one you’re looking for.”
  • A researcher might explain, “I have to sift through the data to identify any anomalies or errors.”
  • A person organizing their closet might say, “I’ll sift through my clothes and donate the ones I no longer wear.”

44. Take a close look

To thoroughly examine or scrutinize something with great attention to detail. “Take a close look” suggests focusing on the specific aspects or elements of the subject.

  • For instance, a mechanic might say, “I’ll take a close look at the engine to determine the problem.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Take a close look at this paragraph and identify any grammatical errors.”
  • A detective might instruct their team, “We need to take a close look at the crime scene for any potential evidence.”

45. Cast an eye over

To briefly and casually examine or scrutinize something. “Cast an eye over” implies a quick and informal observation or assessment.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “I’ll cast an eye over your report before it’s submitted.”
  • A person browsing a magazine might comment, “I’ll just cast an eye over the headlines to see if anything catches my interest.”
  • A teacher might ask, “Can you cast an eye over your notes and summarize the main points?”

46. Give a once-over

To give something a quick look or examination, often to assess its condition or quality.

  • For example, “Before buying a used car, it’s a good idea to give it a once-over to check for any hidden issues.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please give your essay a once-over for any grammatical errors before submitting it.”
  • In a fashion show, a stylist might give a model’s outfit a once-over to ensure everything is in place.