Top 67 Slang For Search – Meaning & Usage

In the age of Google, search has become an integral part of our daily lives. But did you know that there is a whole world of slang for search that is constantly evolving? From Googling to keyword stuffing, we’ve got you covered with a list of the most buzzworthy terms and phrases in the world of search. Get ready to level up your search game and navigate the digital landscape like a pro!

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1. SEO

SEO refers to the practice of optimizing a website to improve its visibility and ranking on search engine results pages (SERPs). It involves various strategies and techniques to increase organic (non-paid) traffic to a website.

  • For example, a digital marketer might say, “We need to focus on SEO to improve our website’s search rankings.”
  • A business owner might ask, “Can you recommend any SEO tools to help us track our website’s performance?”
  • A content creator might say, “I need to learn more about SEO to ensure my articles are easily discoverable by search engines.”

2. SEM

SEM encompasses the strategies and tactics used to promote a website through paid advertising on search engines. It involves creating and managing online ads to increase visibility and drive traffic to a website.

  • For instance, a business owner might say, “We should invest in SEM to reach a wider audience and increase sales.”
  • A digital marketer might discuss different SEM platforms, saying, “Google Ads and Bing Ads are popular options for running SEM campaigns.”
  • A company might hire an SEM specialist to optimize their paid search campaigns and maximize their return on investment.

3. SERP

SERP refers to the page displayed by a search engine in response to a user’s search query. It includes a list of organic search results, paid advertisements, featured snippets, and other search features.

  • For example, a user might say, “The first result on the SERP answered my question perfectly.”
  • A digital marketer might analyze a SERP, saying, “The competition for this keyword is fierce, with multiple ads and featured snippets appearing on the SERP.”
  • A web developer might discuss optimizing a website for better SERP performance, saying, “We need to improve our site’s load speed to rank higher on SERPs.”

4. PPC

PPC is an online advertising model in which advertisers pay a fee each time their ad is clicked. It is a common form of paid search advertising, where advertisers bid on keywords relevant to their target audience.

  • For instance, a digital marketer might say, “We allocated a portion of our budget to PPC campaigns to drive immediate traffic to our website.”
  • An advertiser might discuss the benefits of PPC, saying, “PPC allows us to precisely target our ads and track our return on investment.”
  • A business owner might ask, “How can we optimize our PPC campaigns to reduce cost-per-click and increase conversions?”

5. CTR

CTR is a metric used to measure the percentage of users who click on a specific link or advertisement out of the total number of users who view it. It is often used to evaluate the effectiveness of online advertising campaigns and the relevance of search results.

  • For example, a digital marketer might say, “Our ad has a high CTR, indicating that it is resonating well with our target audience.”
  • A web analyst might discuss the importance of CTR, saying, “Improving the CTR can lead to higher organic rankings and lower advertising costs.”
  • A business owner might ask, “What is considered a good CTR for our industry, and how can we improve ours?”

6. ROI

ROI is a metric used to measure the profitability of an investment. It calculates the percentage of return on the amount invested.

  • For example, a marketer might say, “Our campaign generated a 200% ROI, which is excellent.”
  • A business owner might analyze their marketing efforts and say, “We need to improve our ROI to maximize our profits.”
  • An investor might evaluate different investment options and say, “I’m looking for investments with a high ROI to grow my wealth.”

7. CPC

CPC is a metric used in online advertising to measure the cost incurred by an advertiser for each click on their advertisement.

  • For instance, a digital marketer might say, “Our average CPC for this campaign is $1.50.”
  • A business owner might discuss their advertising budget and say, “We need to lower our CPC to make our campaigns more cost-effective.”
  • An advertiser might compare different advertising platforms and say, “Platform A has a higher CPC, but it also delivers better conversion rates.”

8. CPM

CPM is a metric used in online advertising to measure the cost incurred by an advertiser for every thousand impressions of their advertisement.

  • For example, a digital marketer might say, “Our CPM for this campaign is $5.”
  • A business owner might discuss their advertising strategy and say, “We need to optimize our CPM to reach a larger audience within our budget.”
  • An advertiser might compare different ad formats and say, “Video ads have a higher CPM, but they also tend to have higher engagement rates.”

9. Impressions

Impressions refer to the number of times an advertisement or content is displayed or viewed by users.

  • For instance, a marketer might say, “Our ad received 100,000 impressions in the first week.”
  • A content creator might analyze their reach and say, “Increasing impressions is crucial for growing our audience.”
  • An advertiser might compare different ad placements and say, “Placing the ad on a popular website will increase its impressions.”

10. Conversion

Conversion refers to the desired action taken by a user, such as making a purchase or filling out a form, in response to an advertisement or marketing campaign.

  • For example, a marketer might say, “Our campaign has a conversion rate of 5%, which is considered high in our industry.”
  • A business owner might discuss their sales funnel and say, “Improving our conversion rate is key to increasing revenue.”
  • An advertiser might optimize their landing page and say, “A clear call-to-action can significantly improve conversion rates.”

11. Keywords

Keywords are the specific words or phrases that users enter into a search engine to find relevant information. These words are used to match websites and content with the user’s search query.

  • For example, a user might search for “best restaurants in New York” and the keywords in this case would be “restaurants” and “New York”.
  • In online marketing, businesses often optimize their websites with relevant keywords to improve their search engine rankings.
  • A content creator might research popular keywords in their niche to incorporate into their blog posts and attract more organic traffic.

12. Long-tail keywords

Long-tail keywords are longer and more specific search queries that typically have lower search volumes but higher conversion rates. These keywords are often used by users who have a clear idea of what they are looking for.

  • For instance, instead of searching for “shoes”, a user might search for “women’s running shoes with arch support”.
  • Long-tail keywords can be valuable for businesses as they can attract highly targeted traffic and potential customers.
  • When conducting keyword research, marketers might focus on long-tail keywords that have less competition but still indicate high purchasing intent.

13. Organic search

Organic search refers to the process of obtaining website traffic from search engine results pages (SERPs) without paying for advertising. When a user enters a search query, the search engine displays a list of relevant websites based on their algorithm.

  • For example, if a user searches for “best smartphones”, the websites that appear below the ads are the organic search results.
  • Businesses and website owners strive to improve their organic search rankings through search engine optimization (SEO) techniques like keyword optimization and link building.
  • Higher organic search rankings can lead to increased visibility, website traffic, and potential customers.

Paid search refers to the process of advertising on search engines by paying for ad placements in search engine results pages (SERPs). Advertisers bid on specific keywords and create ads that are displayed when users search for those keywords.

  • For instance, if a user searches for “buy running shoes”, ads for online shoe stores may appear above or alongside the organic search results.
  • Paid search can be an effective way for businesses to reach their target audience and drive immediate traffic to their websites.
  • Advertisers often use platforms like Google Ads to manage their paid search campaigns and track their return on investment (ROI).

15. Ranking

Ranking refers to the position of a website or web page in the search engine results pages (SERPs) for a specific search query. Websites with higher rankings appear closer to the top of the search results and are more likely to be clicked on by users.

  • For example, if a website appears in the first position for a search query, it has a higher ranking than websites that appear below it.
  • Businesses and website owners strive to improve their rankings through search engine optimization (SEO) strategies like keyword optimization, content creation, and link building.
  • Higher rankings can lead to increased visibility, website traffic, and potential customers.

16. Algorithm

An algorithm is a set of rules or instructions that a search engine uses to determine the relevance and ranking of web pages in search results. It takes into account various factors such as keywords, website quality, and user behavior.

  • For example, “Google’s search algorithm is constantly being updated to provide more accurate results.”
  • A user might ask, “Does anyone know how the Instagram algorithm works?”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Understanding search algorithms is essential for optimizing website visibility.”

Backlinks are links from other websites that direct users to your website. They are an important factor in search engine ranking, as they indicate the relevance and authority of your website.

  • For instance, “Getting high-quality backlinks from reputable websites can significantly improve your search rankings.”
  • A website owner might ask, “How can I increase the number of backlinks to my site?”
  • A digital marketer might advise, “Guest posting on relevant blogs is a great way to build backlinks.”

18. Anchor text

Anchor text refers to the clickable text within a hyperlink. It provides context and helps search engines understand the content of the linked page.

  • For example, “Using descriptive anchor text like ‘best running shoes’ can improve your website’s SEO.”
  • A web developer might ask, “What’s the best practice for choosing anchor text for internal links?”
  • A digital marketer might recommend, “Optimizing anchor text with relevant keywords can boost your search rankings.”

19. Meta tags

Meta tags are snippets of code that provide information about a web page to search engines. They help search engines understand the content and purpose of the page, and can influence search rankings.

  • For instance, “Including relevant keywords in your meta tags can improve your website’s visibility.”
  • A website owner might ask, “How do I add meta tags to my website?”
  • A digital marketer might explain, “Meta tags like ‘title’ and ‘description’ are important for optimizing search snippets.”

20. Indexing

Indexing is the process by which search engines gather and store information about web pages. It involves crawling the web, analyzing the content of web pages, and storing the information in a searchable index.

  • For example, “Search engines use indexing to quickly retrieve relevant results for user queries.”
  • A web developer might ask, “How long does it take for a new page to get indexed by Google?”
  • A digital marketer might discuss, “Optimizing your website’s structure can help search engines better crawl and index your content.”

21. Crawling

This term refers to the process of systematically browsing the internet and collecting data from websites. It is often done by search engines to index web pages and gather information for search results.

  • For example, “The search engine crawls websites to gather information for its index.”
  • A web developer might say, “Crawling is an essential step in building a search engine.”
  • An SEO specialist might explain, “Web crawling helps search engines understand the content and structure of a website.”

22. Sitemap

A sitemap is a file that provides information about the pages on a website, including their URLs and how they are organized. It helps search engines understand the structure of a website and index its pages.

  • For instance, “Adding a sitemap to your website can improve its visibility in search results.”
  • A webmaster might say, “I submitted the sitemap to Google for better indexing.”
  • An SEO expert might recommend, “Make sure your sitemap is up to date and includes all relevant pages.”

23. SERM

SERM refers to the practice of managing and improving the online reputation of a brand or individual in search engine results. It involves monitoring search results, addressing negative content, and promoting positive content.

  • For example, “SERM can help a company maintain a positive online image.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “SERM is crucial for protecting a brand’s reputation in search results.”
  • An online business owner might seek advice, “How can I improve my SERM to counter negative reviews?”

24. SER

SER stands for Search Engine Results, which are the pages displayed by a search engine in response to a query. It includes a list of relevant web pages, along with their titles, descriptions, and URLs.

  • For instance, “The SER for the keyword ‘best restaurants’ showed a variety of local listings.”
  • A marketer might analyze, “The top positions in the SER often receive the most clicks.”
  • An SEO specialist might optimize a webpage to improve its ranking in the SER.
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25. SERPS

SERPs stands for Search Engine Results Pages, which are the pages displayed by a search engine in response to a query. It includes a list of relevant web pages, along with their titles, descriptions, and URLs.

  • For example, “The SERPs for the query ‘healthy recipes’ showed a mix of articles and video results.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Optimizing your website for the SERPs can increase organic traffic.”
  • An SEO expert might analyze, “The featured snippet in the SERPs can significantly impact click-through rates.”

26. SERP Features

These are the additional elements that appear on a search engine results page (SERP) besides the organic search results. SERP features include things like featured snippets, knowledge panels, image carousels, and more.

  • For example, “SERP features like rich snippets provide users with quick answers to their queries.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Optimizing for SERP features can help increase visibility and click-through rates.”
  • In a discussion about search engine optimization, someone might ask, “What are the most common SERP features and how can I optimize for them?”

27. SERP Snippet

This refers to the brief description or preview of a web page that appears on a search engine results page (SERP). The snippet gives users a glimpse of what to expect if they click on the link.

  • For instance, “A well-crafted SERP snippet can entice users to click on your website.”
  • In a conversation about improving click-through rates, someone might suggest, “Try writing compelling SERP snippets to increase engagement.”
  • A digital marketer might analyze the effectiveness of different SERP snippets and say, “We saw a significant increase in traffic after optimizing our SERP snippets.”

28. SERP Position

This refers to the ranking or placement of a website or web page on a search engine results page (SERP). The higher a website appears in the search results, the better its SERP position.

  • For example, “If your website is not ranking well, you may need to improve its SERP position.”
  • In a discussion about search engine optimization, someone might ask, “What strategies can I use to improve my SERP position?”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Tracking your SERP position is crucial for monitoring the success of your SEO efforts.”

29. SERP Analysis

This refers to the process of evaluating and interpreting the data and information found on a search engine results page (SERP). SERP analysis helps marketers understand how their website or web page is performing in search results.

  • For instance, “Performing a SERP analysis can provide valuable insights into your competitors’ strategies.”
  • In a conversation about improving search visibility, someone might suggest, “Start with a thorough SERP analysis to identify opportunities.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “SERP analysis is an ongoing process that requires monitoring and adaptation.”

30. SERP Tracking

This refers to the practice of monitoring and recording the position and performance of a website or web page on a search engine results page (SERP) over time. SERP tracking helps marketers understand how their website is ranking and performing in search results.

  • For example, “Using a SERP tracking tool can help you keep tabs on your website’s search visibility.”
  • In a discussion about SEO strategies, someone might ask, “What are the best practices for SERP tracking?”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Regular SERP tracking is essential for evaluating the effectiveness of your SEO efforts.”

31. SERP Volatility

This term refers to the fluctuation or instability of search engine results pages (SERPs). It indicates how much the rankings of websites and webpages change over time.

  • For example, “The SERP volatility for this keyword is high, with rankings constantly shifting.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Tracking SERP volatility helps us understand the competitiveness of keywords.”
  • A SEO expert might advise, “If you notice high SERP volatility, it’s important to regularly monitor and optimize your website’s content.”

32. SERP Clicks

This term refers to the number of times users click on a specific search engine results page (SERP) listing. It is an important metric for measuring the effectiveness of a webpage’s ranking.

  • For instance, “Our website received 100 SERP clicks last month from organic search.”
  • A digital analyst might say, “Increasing SERP clicks requires optimizing meta tags and compelling page titles.”
  • A SEO specialist might recommend, “To improve SERP clicks, focus on creating engaging and informative meta descriptions.”

33. SERP Impressions

This term refers to the number of times a webpage’s listing appears on a search engine results page (SERP). It indicates the visibility and exposure of a webpage in search results.

  • For example, “Our blog post had 1,000 SERP impressions, but only 100 clicks.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Increasing SERP impressions can be achieved through search engine optimization (SEO) strategies.”
  • A SEO consultant might suggest, “Optimizing your website’s content and improving its relevance can help increase SERP impressions.”

34. SERP Click-Through

This term refers to the percentage of users who click on a specific search engine results page (SERP) listing out of the total number of impressions. It is an important metric for evaluating the effectiveness of a webpage’s ranking.

  • For instance, “Our SERP click-through rate was 10%, indicating a need for better title tags and meta descriptions.”
  • A digital analyst might say, “Improving SERP click-through requires optimizing page titles and meta descriptions to make them more enticing.”
  • A SEO specialist might recommend, “Experimenting with different meta tags and analyzing their impact on SERP click-through can help improve website traffic.”

35. SERP Visibility

This term refers to the overall presence and prominence of a website or webpage on search engine results pages (SERPs). It is a measure of how often and prominently a webpage appears in search results for relevant queries.

  • For example, “Our website’s SERP visibility has significantly increased since implementing SEO strategies.”
  • A digital marketer might say, “Improving SERP visibility requires a combination of technical optimization and content relevance.”
  • A SEO consultant might suggest, “Regularly monitoring and improving SERP visibility can help increase organic traffic and online visibility.”

36. SERP Competition

This term refers to the competition between websites to rank higher in search engine results pages (SERPs). It represents the efforts made by different websites to optimize their content and website structure in order to appear higher in search results.

  • For example, a digital marketer might say, “We need to analyze our SERP competition to understand why our website is not ranking well.”
  • In a discussion about SEO strategies, someone might ask, “How do you stay ahead of SERP competition and maintain a high ranking?”
  • A website owner might say, “We need to focus on our SERP competition and improve our website’s visibility in search results.”

37. SERP Ranking Factors

These are the various elements and criteria that search engines use to determine the ranking of websites in search results. SERP ranking factors include factors such as website relevance, page load speed, mobile-friendliness, backlinks, and many others.

  • For instance, an SEO specialist might say, “Understanding SERP ranking factors is crucial for optimizing a website.”
  • In a discussion about SEO best practices, someone might ask, “What are the most important SERP ranking factors to focus on?”
  • A digital marketer might say, “We need to analyze our website’s performance based on SERP ranking factors to improve our search visibility.”

38. Google it

This phrase is used to suggest searching for information using the Google search engine. It has become a common way to encourage someone to look up something online.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What is the capital of France?”, someone might respond, “Just Google it.”
  • In a conversation about finding a recipe, someone might say, “I’m not sure how to make lasagna. I’ll just Google it.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Do you know when the assignment is due? Can you Google it?”

39. Bing it

Similar to “Google it,” this phrase is used to suggest searching for information using the Bing search engine. It is less commonly used than “Google it,” but still recognizable.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What’s the weather like today?”, someone might respond, “I’m not sure. Bing it.”
  • In a conversation about finding a movie, someone might say, “I can’t remember the name of that actor. I’ll just Bing it.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Have you heard of this new band? Can you Bing it and find some of their songs?”

40. Yahoo it

Similar to “Google it” and “Bing it,” this phrase is used to suggest searching for information using the Yahoo search engine. It is less commonly used than the other two phrases, but still recognizable.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Who won the World Series last year?”, someone might respond, “I’m not sure. Yahoo it.”
  • In a conversation about finding a restaurant, someone might say, “I’m looking for a good pizza place. I’ll just Yahoo it.”
  • A person might ask a colleague, “Do you know the exchange rate for the Euro? Can you Yahoo it and let me know?”

41. Hunt for it

This slang phrase means to search for something with determination and persistence. It implies that the search is not passive, but rather an active pursuit.

  • For example, if someone is looking for a specific item in a store, they might say, “I’m going to hunt for it until I find it.”
  • In a conversation about finding a solution to a problem, someone might suggest, “Let’s hunt for it together and brainstorm ideas.”
  • A person discussing job hunting might say, “I’ve been hunting for a new job for months and finally found the perfect opportunity.”

42. Explore it

This slang phrase means to search for information or details about something in a thorough and comprehensive manner. It implies a sense of curiosity and a desire to uncover new knowledge.

  • For instance, if someone is researching a specific topic, they might say, “I’m going to explore it and gather as much information as possible.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, a person might suggest, “Let’s explore it and try different dishes on the menu.”
  • A student discussing a research project might say, “I’m excited to explore it and discover new insights.”

43. Dig for it

This slang phrase means to search for something with great effort and determination. It implies that the search requires digging deep or delving into various sources or resources.

  • For example, if someone is looking for a specific piece of information, they might say, “I’m going to dig for it and find the answer.”
  • In a conversation about finding evidence, someone might suggest, “Let’s dig for it and gather all the necessary facts.”
  • A person discussing genealogy research might say, “I’ve been digging for my family history and uncovering fascinating stories.”

44. Scout it

This slang phrase means to search or examine a particular area or subject in order to gather information or assess its potential. It implies a sense of scouting or exploring to find valuable or useful insights.

  • For instance, if someone is looking for a new apartment, they might say, “I’m going to scout it and check out the neighborhood.”
  • In a conversation about finding a location for a photo shoot, a person might suggest, “Let’s scout it and see if it fits our vision.”
  • A business owner discussing market research might say, “We need to scout our target audience and understand their needs.”

45. Probe for it

This slang phrase means to search or examine something in a methodical and thorough manner. It implies a sense of probing or investigating to uncover hidden or deeper information.

  • For example, if someone is trying to understand a complex issue, they might say, “I’m going to probe for it and analyze all the factors.”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious event, someone might suggest, “Let’s probe for it and find out the truth.”
  • A journalist discussing investigative reporting might say, “We need to probe for the facts and uncover the story behind it.”

46. Ferret it out

This phrase means to search for something diligently and uncover it, often through thorough investigation or examination.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to ferret out the truth behind this mysterious case.”
  • In a search for hidden treasure, someone might exclaim, “Let’s ferret it out and see what we find!”
  • When trying to find a solution to a difficult problem, a person might say, “I’ll have to ferret it out and come up with a solution.”

47. Track it down

This phrase means to locate something by following a trail of evidence or clues.

  • For instance, a private investigator might say, “I’ll track down the suspect and bring them to justice.”
  • When searching for a lost item, someone might say, “I’ll track it down and return it to its owner.”
  • In a quest to find the truth, a journalist might say, “I’ll track down the source and get the full story.”

48. Investigate it

This phrase means to conduct a detailed examination or inquiry into something in order to gather information or uncover the truth.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to investigate the crime scene for any clues.”
  • When researching a suspicious activity, someone might say, “I’ll investigate it and see if there’s anything to be concerned about.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might say, “We’ll investigate the effects of the new drug on the subjects.”

49. Research it

This phrase means to engage in a systematic study or investigation in order to gather information or expand knowledge on a particular topic.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to research it before writing my essay.”
  • When looking for information about a specific subject, someone might say, “I’ll research it and see what I can find.”
  • In a quest for knowledge, a scientist might say, “I’ll research it to better understand its properties and effects.”

50. Scan for it

This phrase means to quickly glance or look over something in order to find or identify a specific item or piece of information.

  • For example, a person searching for a specific word in a document might say, “I’ll scan for it and see if it’s there.”
  • When looking for a particular item in a store, someone might say, “I’ll scan for it and see if they have it in stock.”
  • In a search for a specific image, a person might say, “I’ll scan for it and see if it’s in the photo collection.”

51. Rummage for it

This phrase means to search for something by moving things around or searching through a messy or disorganized area.

  • For example, if you can’t find your keys, you might say, “I need to rummage for them in my bag.”
  • When searching for a specific document in a messy filing cabinet, you might say, “I’ll have to rummage for it.”
  • If someone asks where you found a lost item, you can say, “I rummaged for it in the back of the closet.”

52. Delve into it

This phrase means to search deeply or thoroughly into something, often to gain a better understanding or find specific information.

  • For instance, if you want to learn more about a particular topic, you might say, “I’m going to delve into it and read some books.”
  • When researching for a school project, you might say, “I need to delve into the history of this event.”
  • If someone asks how you found a rare piece of information, you can say, “I delved into it and found it in an obscure book.”

53. Fish for it

This phrase means to search for something by asking questions or making indirect attempts to obtain information.

  • For example, if you’re trying to find out if someone likes you, you might say, “I’ll fish for it by asking their friends.”
  • When trying to get a hint about a surprise party, you might say, “I’ll fish for it by casually bringing up the topic.”
  • If someone asks how you discovered a secret, you can say, “I fished for it by dropping subtle hints and observing their reactions.”

54. Prowl for it

This phrase means to search for something actively, often with a sense of determination or urgency.

  • For instance, if you’re looking for a job, you might say, “I’m prowling for opportunities online.”
  • When searching for a specific item in a store, you might say, “I’ll prowl for it in the clearance section.”
  • If someone asks how you found a rare collectible, you can say, “I prowled for it at various antique shops and flea markets.”

55. Quest for it

This phrase means to go on a journey or mission in search of something, often with a sense of adventure or purpose.

  • For example, if you’re looking for your true passion in life, you might say, “I’m on a quest for it.”
  • When searching for a hidden treasure, you might say, “I’ll embark on a quest for it and follow the clues.”
  • If someone asks how you found a rare artifact, you can say, “I went on a quest for it and explored ancient ruins.”

56. Pursue it

When someone says “Pursue it,” they mean to actively seek or go after something. It implies a determined effort to achieve a goal or find information.

  • For example, if someone is looking for a specific item online, they might say, “I’m going to pursue it until I find it.”
  • In a conversation about career opportunities, a person might say, “If you’re passionate about something, don’t be afraid to pursue it.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Whatever your dream is, don’t give up. Pursue it with all your heart.”

57. Explore the web

To “Explore the web” means to browse or search through various websites and online content. It implies an open-minded approach to discovering new information or resources.

  • For instance, if someone is researching a topic, they might say, “I’m going to explore the web to gather more information.”
  • In a discussion about online shopping, a person might suggest, “Explore the web for the best deals before making a purchase.”
  • A tech-savvy individual might advise a friend, “If you’re looking for a new hobby, explore the web for inspiration and ideas.”

58. Seek it

When someone says “Seek it,” they mean to actively search or look for something. It implies a purposeful effort to find a specific item or information.

  • For example, if someone is trying to find a book in a library, they might say, “I need to seek it in the non-fiction section.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, a person might say, “I’m seeking a position in the marketing industry.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you seeking advice or just venting?”

59. Hunt it down

To “Hunt it down” means to search for something persistently and determinedly. It implies a relentless pursuit of a target or information.

  • For instance, if someone is searching for a rare collectible, they might say, “I’m going to hunt it down no matter what.”
  • In a discussion about finding a specific recipe, a person might say, “I’ve been trying to hunt it down for weeks.”
  • A detective in a crime novel might say, “I’ll hunt down the truth and bring the culprit to justice.”

60. Scout it out

To “Scout it out” means to explore or examine an area or situation in order to gather information or assess its suitability. It implies a strategic and observant approach to finding what one is looking for.

  • For example, if someone is looking for a new apartment, they might say, “I’m going to scout it out before making a decision.”
  • In a conversation about vacation destinations, a person might say, “Let’s scout out the options and choose the best one.”
  • A hiker planning a trail might say, “I need to scout it out beforehand to ensure it’s safe and enjoyable.”

61. Probe it

To carefully examine or explore a topic or issue. “Probe it” is a slang phrase used to indicate the act of conducting a thorough investigation.

  • For example, if someone is researching a conspiracy theory, they might say, “I’m going to probe it and see what I can find.”
  • In a discussion about a mysterious event, a person might ask, “Has anyone tried to probe it further?”
  • Someone might comment on a news article, “This story needs more probing to uncover the truth.”

62. Dig it up

To search for or uncover information or details about a specific topic. “Dig it up” is a slang phrase used to express the act of finding information through research or investigation.

  • For instance, if someone is trying to find old photographs, they might say, “I’m going to dig it up from my photo albums.”
  • In a conversation about historical events, a person might comment, “Let’s dig it up and learn more about what really happened.”
  • Someone might ask a friend, “Can you dig it up for me? I need more information on this topic.”

63. Uncover it

To bring something hidden or unknown to light. “Uncover it” is a slang phrase used to describe the act of revealing or discovering something previously unknown or hidden.

  • For example, if someone finds evidence of a secret relationship, they might say, “I finally uncovered it.”
  • In a discussion about a hidden treasure, a person might comment, “I wonder who will be the one to uncover it.”
  • Someone might share a news article and say, “This article uncovers the truth about a famous conspiracy theory.”

64. Discover it

To find or learn something for the first time. “Discover it” is a slang phrase used to express the act of finding or learning something new or previously unknown.

  • For instance, if someone finds a new hiking trail, they might say, “I discovered it while exploring the woods.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific breakthrough, a person might comment, “Scientists discovered it after years of research.”
  • Someone might share a new song and say, “I just discovered it and can’t stop listening.”

65. Check it out

To look at or examine something. “Check it out” is a slang phrase used to suggest someone should take a look or pay attention to something of interest.

  • For example, if someone sees a cool car, they might say, “Hey, check it out!”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, a person might recommend, “You should check it out. The food is amazing.”
  • Someone might share a link to a funny video and say, “Check it out, it’s hilarious!”

66. Browse for it

This phrase is used to indicate casually searching for something online or in a physical location. It implies a more relaxed and leisurely approach to finding information or an item.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m just going to browse for some new shoes online.”
  • When looking for a specific book in a bookstore, someone might ask, “Can you help me browse for it?”
  • A user might comment on a forum, “I’ve been browsing for a good recipe for hours and still haven’t found one.”

67. Scrutinize it

To scrutinize something means to examine or inspect it closely and carefully. In the context of search, it refers to thoroughly analyzing or investigating information or an object.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Make sure to scrutinize your sources before using them in your research.”
  • When evaluating a potential purchase, someone might say, “I’m going to scrutinize this product for any flaws.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a user might comment, “It’s important to scrutinize the information we find online to avoid spreading misinformation.”