Top 54 Slang For Security – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to online safety and protecting your personal information, staying up-to-date with the latest security slang is crucial. In a world filled with cyber threats and data breaches, knowing the lingo can help you navigate the digital landscape with confidence. Let us guide you through some of the most essential security terms to keep you informed and secure online.

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1. Fort Knox

This phrase refers to something that is extremely secure or difficult to breach, similar to the heavily fortified United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox.

  • For example, “The new encryption software is like Fort Knox, protecting our data from hackers.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like my house is Fort Knox with all the security measures I have in place.”
  • When discussing a secure password, someone might say, “Make sure your password is Fort Knox-level strong.”

2. Lockdown

This term is used to describe a situation where security measures are intensified or tightened, often due to a threat or emergency.

  • For instance, “The school went into lockdown after reports of a suspicious individual in the area.”
  • During a crisis, someone might say, “We need to go into lockdown to ensure everyone’s safety.”
  • In a discussion about airport security, a person might mention, “After a security breach, the airport went into lockdown mode.”

3. Ironclad

This slang term refers to something that is extremely strong or secure, like a ship with iron armor plates. It can be used to describe a security measure or system.

  • For example, “The new encryption algorithm provides ironclad protection against hacking.”
  • A person might say, “We need to have an ironclad security plan in place to prevent any breaches.”
  • When discussing a secure contract, someone might say, “We made sure to include ironclad clauses to protect our interests.”

4. Safe and sound

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is in a state of safety and free from harm or danger.

  • For instance, “After the earthquake, we were relieved to find our family safe and sound.”
  • A person might say, “Make sure to lock your doors and windows to keep your home safe and sound.”
  • When discussing the outcome of a dangerous situation, someone might say, “Thanks to the security measures, everyone made it out safe and sound.”

5. Bulletproof

This term is used to describe something that is highly secure or protected, often in the context of security measures or systems.

  • For example, “The new firewall system is bulletproof, preventing any unauthorized access.”
  • A person might say, “We need to have bulletproof security protocols in place to prevent any breaches.”
  • When discussing a secure network, someone might say, “Our system is bulletproof against any hacking attempts.”

6. Bunker

A bunker is a heavily fortified structure or underground shelter designed to provide protection in times of danger or emergency. It is often used metaphorically to refer to a secure location or a place of refuge.

  • For example, during a storm, someone might say, “Let’s take shelter in the bunker until the weather clears.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, a person might mention, “Having a strong firewall is like having a bunker for your data.”
  • A person describing their home security measures might say, “I have a panic room that’s basically a bunker in case of a break-in.”

7. Shielded

To be shielded means to be protected or guarded from harm or danger. It is often used in the context of security to describe measures taken to safeguard something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I keep my important documents in a fireproof safe to ensure they are shielded from any potential damage.”
  • In a discussion about online privacy, someone might mention, “Using a virtual private network (VPN) can shield your internet activity from prying eyes.”
  • A person describing their personal security habits might say, “I always lock my doors and windows to ensure my home is shielded against intruders.”

8. Sentry

A sentry is a person or object that stands watch or keeps guard over a specific area. In the context of security, it refers to someone or something that monitors and protects against potential threats.

  • For example, a security guard stationed at the entrance of a building can be referred to as a sentry.
  • In a military setting, a soldier posted at a lookout point might be called a sentry.
  • A person discussing home security might say, “I have a surveillance camera installed outside my house to act as a sentry.”

9. Firewall

A firewall is a network security device that monitors and controls incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules. It acts as a barrier between a trusted internal network and an untrusted external network.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Having a strong firewall is essential to protect your computer from unauthorized access.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might mention, “A firewall acts as a barrier, blocking potential threats from entering your network.”
  • A person explaining the importance of network security might say, “Think of a firewall as a protective wall that keeps your data safe from malicious attacks.”

10. Vault

A vault is a secure room or compartment used for storing valuable items, such as money, documents, or precious metals. It is often used metaphorically to describe a highly secure place or storage system.

  • For example, a person might say, “The bank’s vault is equipped with advanced security measures to protect customers’ valuables.”
  • In a discussion about data protection, someone might mention, “Using encryption is like putting your files in a digital vault.”
  • A person describing their home security might say, “I have a hidden vault where I keep my most valuable possessions.”

11. Watchdog

A watchdog is a term used to describe someone or something that keeps a close eye on a particular situation or organization to ensure its safety or integrity.

  • For example, “The government appointed a watchdog to monitor the company’s financial activities.”
  • In a discussion about online privacy, someone might say, “We need a watchdog to protect our personal information from being exploited.”
  • A journalist investigating corruption might be referred to as a watchdog, as they work to expose wrongdoing and hold those responsible accountable.

12. Secure as a bank

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is highly secure and unlikely to be breached or compromised.

  • For instance, “Our new encryption technology is as secure as a bank.”
  • When discussing the safety of a password, someone might say, “Make sure your password is secure as a bank.”
  • In a conversation about home security, a person might comment, “With the latest alarm system, our house is secure as a bank.”

13. Defend

To defend means to take action or measures to protect someone or something from harm, danger, or attack.

  • For example, “The security guard was able to defend the store from the intruders.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “We need to defend our network against potential hackers.”
  • A person advocating for self-defense might argue, “Everyone has the right to defend themselves in a threatening situation.”

14. Surveillance

Surveillance refers to the act of closely observing or monitoring someone or something, often for the purpose of gathering information or ensuring security.

  • For instance, “The security cameras provide constant surveillance of the building.”
  • In a discussion about government monitoring, someone might say, “The increased surveillance infringes on our privacy.”
  • A person concerned about online security might comment, “We should be aware of the surveillance tactics used by tech companies.”

15. Safe haven

A safe haven is a place or environment where someone or something is protected from harm or danger.

  • For example, “The embassy served as a safe haven for refugees during the war.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might say, “Gold is often considered a safe haven during times of economic uncertainty.”
  • A person discussing online privacy might argue, “We should have the right to seek a safe haven for our personal data.”

16. Lock and key

This term refers to a situation or system that is well-protected and difficult to breach. It often implies a high level of security.

  • For example, “Our data is locked and key, with multiple layers of encryption.”
  • In a discussion about home security, someone might say, “I make sure to lock and key all my windows and doors before leaving.”
  • A cybersecurity expert might advise, “Always keep your sensitive information locked and key, with strong passwords and two-factor authentication.”

17. Fortified

This term describes something that has been made stronger and more secure, often through the addition of extra protection or defenses.

  • For instance, “The castle was fortified with high walls, a moat, and armed guards.”
  • In a conversation about securing a building, one might say, “We need to fortify the entrances and install security cameras.”
  • A military strategist might discuss fortifying a position, saying, “We should fortify our defenses along the perimeter to repel any attacks.”

18. Armored

This term refers to something that is shielded or protected by armor, usually to provide a high level of security and resistance to damage.

  • For example, “The armored car transported the valuable cargo safely.”
  • In a discussion about personal protection, someone might say, “I wear an armored vest for added security.”
  • A technology enthusiast might mention, “This smartphone has an armored casing to protect against drops and impacts.”

19. Vigilant

This term describes a state of being constantly watchful and alert for potential threats or dangers. It implies a proactive approach to security.

  • For instance, “The security guard remained vigilant throughout the night, monitoring the premises.”
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, one might say, “We need to be vigilant against phishing attempts and malware.”
  • A neighborhood watch member might encourage others to be vigilant, saying, “Keep an eye out for any suspicious activity in our community.”

20. Safe zone

This term refers to a designated area or space where individuals feel safe and protected from harm or danger.

  • For example, “The school established a safe zone for students to seek refuge during emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might say, “I always try to identify safe zones in unfamiliar areas.”
  • A therapist might discuss the importance of creating a safe zone for clients, saying, “It’s essential to establish a safe zone in therapy where clients feel comfortable expressing themselves.”

21. Guarded

When someone is “guarded,” it means they are cautious or careful about what they say or do. In the context of security, being “guarded” refers to taking steps to protect sensitive information or assets from potential threats.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m always guarded when it comes to sharing personal information online.”
  • In a discussion about securing a physical location, someone might suggest, “We should have a guarded entrance with security personnel.”
  • A cybersecurity expert might advise, “It’s important to have a guarded approach to password management to prevent unauthorized access.”

22. Cyber Hygiene

Cyber hygiene refers to the practices and habits individuals and organizations should follow to maintain good online security and protect against cyber threats. It involves adopting and implementing safe online behaviors and regularly updating and maintaining security measures.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I make sure to practice good cyber hygiene by regularly updating my software and using strong, unique passwords.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity best practices, someone might mention, “Regularly backing up your data is an essential part of cyber hygiene.”
  • An IT professional might advise, “Educating employees about phishing attacks and other common cyber threats is crucial for maintaining good cyber hygiene.”

23. Infosec

Infosec is a commonly used abbreviation for information security. It encompasses the practices, measures, and technologies used to protect sensitive information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, or destruction.

  • For example, a person might say, “I work in infosec and specialize in network security.”
  • In a discussion about data breaches, someone might mention, “A strong infosec strategy can help mitigate the risks of a cyber attack.”
  • An IT professional might advise, “Implementing encryption is an important aspect of infosec to protect data in transit and at rest.”

24. Perimeter Defense

Perimeter defense refers to the strategies and measures implemented to protect the outer boundary of a system or network from unauthorized access or intrusion. It involves establishing barriers and controls to prevent or detect potential threats before they can breach the perimeter.

  • For instance, a person might say, “We have a strong perimeter defense system in place to protect our network from external threats.”
  • In a discussion about network security, someone might mention, “Firewalls and intrusion prevention systems are essential components of a robust perimeter defense.”
  • A cybersecurity expert might advise, “Regularly monitoring and updating your perimeter defense measures is crucial to stay ahead of evolving threats.”

25. Intrusion Detection System (IDS)

An Intrusion Detection System (IDS) is a security technology that monitors network or system activities for signs of unauthorized access, misuse, or malicious activities. It detects and alerts security personnel about potential threats or breaches in real-time, allowing for timely response and mitigation.

  • For example, a person might say, “We installed an IDS to enhance our network security and quickly identify any suspicious activity.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity tools, someone might mention, “An IDS can help organizations detect and respond to advanced persistent threats.”
  • A network administrator might advise, “Configuring your IDS properly and regularly reviewing its logs is essential for effective threat detection and response.”

26. Penetration Testing

Penetration testing refers to the practice of testing a computer system, network, or web application to identify vulnerabilities that could potentially be exploited by attackers. It involves simulating real-world attacks to assess the security of a system or network.

  • For example, a company might hire a penetration tester to evaluate the security of its website and identify any potential weaknesses.
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “Penetration testing is an essential part of ensuring the security of a system.”
  • A cybersecurity professional might explain, “Penetration testers use a variety of tools and techniques to identify vulnerabilities and help organizations improve their security posture.”

27. White Hat Hacker

A white hat hacker is an individual who uses their hacking skills for ethical purposes. They work to identify vulnerabilities in computer systems, networks, or software and help organizations improve their security. White hat hackers often work as part of a security team or are hired by companies to test the security of their systems.

  • For instance, a white hat hacker might discover a vulnerability in a company’s website and report it to the organization so they can fix it.
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, someone might say, “White hat hackers play a crucial role in protecting organizations from cyber threats.”
  • A cybersecurity expert might explain, “White hat hackers follow strict ethical guidelines and use their skills to help improve security rather than exploit vulnerabilities.”

28. Black Hat Hacker

A black hat hacker is an individual who uses their hacking skills for malicious purposes. They engage in unauthorized activities, such as exploiting vulnerabilities in computer systems, networks, or software, for personal gain or to cause harm. Black hat hackers are often associated with illegal activities and cybercrime.

  • For example, a black hat hacker might steal sensitive information, disrupt computer systems, or launch a cyberattack for financial gain.
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “Black hat hackers pose a significant threat to individuals and organizations.”
  • A cybersecurity professional might explain, “Black hat hackers exploit vulnerabilities for personal gain and engage in illegal activities.”

29. Phishing

Phishing is a type of cyber attack where attackers attempt to trick individuals into revealing sensitive information, such as passwords, credit card numbers, or personal data. They often do this by impersonating a trusted entity or creating a sense of urgency to manipulate the victim into taking a specific action.

  • For instance, a phishing email might appear to be from a legitimate bank, asking the recipient to click on a link and provide their account details.
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, someone might say, “Phishing attacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated and difficult to detect.”
  • A cybersecurity expert might warn, “It’s important to be cautious of suspicious emails or messages that ask for personal information, as they could be phishing attempts.”

30. Two-factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication (2FA) is a security measure that requires users to provide two different forms of identification to access a system or account. It adds an extra layer of security by combining something the user knows (e.g., a password) with something they have (e.g., a unique code sent to their mobile device).

  • For example, when logging into a website, a user might enter their password and then receive a text message with a code that they need to enter for verification.
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “Two-factor authentication is an effective way to protect against unauthorized access.”
  • A cybersecurity professional might explain, “Using two-factor authentication can significantly reduce the risk of account compromise and data breaches.”

31. Encryption

Encryption is the process of converting information or data into a code or cipher to prevent unauthorized access. It is a crucial technique used to protect sensitive information and maintain security.

  • For example, “End-to-end encryption ensures that only the sender and recipient can read the message.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, one might say, “Strong encryption is essential to safeguarding data from hackers.”
  • A tech expert might explain, “Encryption algorithms like AES and RSA are widely used to secure data transmission.”

32. Malware

Malware refers to any software or program that is designed to harm, disrupt, or gain unauthorized access to a computer system or network. It includes various types of malicious software such as viruses, worms, Trojans, and ransomware.

  • For instance, “My computer got infected with malware after clicking on a suspicious link.”
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, one might say, “Protecting against malware requires robust antivirus software.”
  • A cybersecurity professional might warn, “Be cautious of downloading files from untrusted sources to avoid malware infections.”

33. VPN

A VPN is a secure and private network connection established over a public network, such as the internet. It allows users to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if their devices were directly connected to a private network, providing enhanced privacy and security.

  • For example, “I use a VPN to protect my online privacy and encrypt my internet traffic.”
  • In a discussion about remote work, one might say, “A VPN is essential for accessing company resources securely.”
  • A privacy advocate might argue, “Everyone should use a VPN to prevent their internet service provider from tracking their online activities.”

34. Patch

A patch refers to a software update or fix that is released by a software developer to address vulnerabilities, bugs, or other issues in their software. Applying patches is crucial for maintaining the security and functionality of software and systems.

  • For instance, “Make sure to install the latest patch to protect your computer from security vulnerabilities.”
  • In a conversation about software development, one might say, “The development team is working on a patch to address the reported bugs.”
  • A tech enthusiast might advise, “Regularly check for software updates and patches to keep your devices secure.”

35. Zero-day Exploit

A zero-day exploit refers to a vulnerability or software flaw that is unknown to the software developer or vendor. It is called “zero-day” because the developer has zero days to fix the vulnerability before it is exploited by hackers or malicious actors.

  • For example, “A hacker used a zero-day exploit to breach the company’s network.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, one might say, “Zero-day exploits pose a significant threat to computer systems and networks.”
  • A cybersecurity analyst might explain, “Zero-day vulnerabilities are highly valuable in the hacking community and can be sold for large sums of money.”

36. Social Engineering

Social engineering refers to the use of manipulation tactics to deceive individuals into revealing sensitive information or performing actions that may compromise security. It often involves exploiting human psychology and trust to gain unauthorized access to systems or data.

  • For example, a hacker might use social engineering to trick someone into revealing their password by pretending to be a trusted source.
  • In a cybersecurity training session, an instructor might explain, “Beware of social engineering attacks, such as phishing emails or phone calls.”
  • A security professional might say, “Social engineering is a constant threat that requires ongoing education and awareness.”

37. Endpoint Security

Endpoint security refers to the protection of devices, such as computers, smartphones, or tablets, that connect to a network. It involves implementing measures to prevent unauthorized access, detect and block malware, and secure data stored on these devices.

  • For instance, an IT administrator might install antivirus software and firewall protection to enhance endpoint security.
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, a technology expert might explain, “Endpoint security is crucial in today’s interconnected world to prevent data breaches.”
  • A user might ask, “What are some best practices for improving endpoint security on my personal devices?”

38. Data Breach

A data breach refers to the unauthorized access, acquisition, or disclosure of sensitive or confidential information. It often occurs due to security vulnerabilities or malicious actions, and can result in the exposure of personal or financial data.

  • For example, a company might experience a data breach when hackers gain access to customer information.
  • In a news article about cybersecurity, a journalist might report, “The data breach compromised millions of user accounts.”
  • A cybersecurity analyst might warn, “Preventing data breaches requires a multi-layered approach, including encryption and regular security assessments.”

39. Security Audit

A security audit is a systematic evaluation of an organization’s security measures to assess their effectiveness and identify vulnerabilities. It involves reviewing policies, procedures, and technical controls to ensure they meet industry standards and best practices.

  • For instance, a company might conduct a security audit to assess their network infrastructure and identify any weaknesses.
  • In a conversation about compliance, a compliance officer might say, “We need to schedule a security audit to ensure we’re meeting regulatory requirements.”
  • A cybersecurity consultant might recommend, “Regular security audits are essential for maintaining a strong security posture and staying ahead of potential threats.”

40. Access Control

Access control refers to the practice of restricting or granting access to resources, systems, or data based on predefined rules and policies. It involves implementing authentication mechanisms, such as passwords or biometrics, and authorization protocols to ensure only authorized individuals can access specific resources.

  • For example, a company might use access control measures to limit employee access to sensitive data.
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, an expert might explain, “Access control is a fundamental principle in protecting against unauthorized access.”
  • A system administrator might ask, “What are some best practices for implementing access control in a network environment?”

41. Secure Socket Layer (SSL)

Secure Socket Layer (SSL) is a cryptographic protocol that provides secure communication over a computer network. It ensures that data transmitted between a web server and a browser remains encrypted and protected from unauthorized access.

  • For example, a user might say, “I always look for the padlock icon in my browser to make sure the website is using SSL.”
  • In a discussion about online security, someone might mention, “SSL is essential for protecting sensitive information like credit card details.”
  • A web developer might say, “Implementing SSL on a website is crucial to establish trust with users and protect their data.”

42. Ransomware

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that encrypts a victim’s files or locks their computer and demands a ransom payment in exchange for restoring access. It is a growing threat in the digital world and can cause significant damage to individuals and organizations.

  • For instance, a user might say, “I got hit by ransomware and lost all my important files.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might warn, “Be cautious when opening suspicious email attachments to avoid ransomware attacks.”
  • A cybersecurity expert might advise, “Regularly backing up your data is essential to mitigate the impact of a ransomware attack.”

43. Security Token

A security token is a physical device or software application used to generate secure authentication codes or passwords. It adds an extra layer of security to the login process and helps protect sensitive information from unauthorized access.

  • For example, a user might say, “I use a security token to log in to my online banking account.”
  • In a discussion about two-factor authentication, someone might explain, “A security token is a common method of providing the second factor of authentication.”
  • A cybersecurity professional might recommend, “Using a security token is an effective way to prevent unauthorized access to your accounts.”

44. Biometrics

Biometrics refers to the measurement and analysis of unique physical or behavioral characteristics, such as fingerprints, facial features, or voice patterns, for identification or authentication purposes. It provides a more secure and convenient way to verify the identity of individuals.

  • For instance, a user might say, “I use my fingerprint to unlock my smartphone using biometrics.”
  • In a discussion about airport security, someone might mention, “Biometrics are increasingly used for faster and more accurate passenger identification.”
  • A technology enthusiast might explain, “Biometric authentication relies on the uniqueness of individual traits, making it difficult to forge or replicate.”

45. Security Clearance

A security clearance is a status granted to individuals who have been vetted and authorized to access classified information or work on sensitive projects. It is typically required for government employees, contractors, or individuals working in industries that deal with national security.

  • For example, a user might say, “I had to go through a rigorous background check to obtain a security clearance.”
  • In a discussion about government jobs, someone might ask, “What level of security clearance is needed for this position?”
  • An intelligence officer might explain, “Having a security clearance allows me to access classified information necessary for my work.”

46. Sentinel

In the context of security, a sentinel refers to a guard or watchman who is responsible for keeping a lookout and protecting a specific area or object. The term can also be used metaphorically to describe a person or system that is constantly vigilant and on the lookout for potential threats.

  • For example, “The security team hired a sentinel to patrol the premises at night.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, one might say, “An effective antivirus software acts as a sentinel, constantly monitoring for malware.”
  • A military commander might give the order, “Station a sentinel at each entrance to the base to ensure no unauthorized personnel enter.”

47. Safehouse

A safehouse is a secure location, typically a house or building, used as a hiding place or refuge for individuals who need protection or anonymity. Safehouses are often used by law enforcement agencies, intelligence organizations, or individuals involved in clandestine activities.

  • For instance, “The undercover agent was taken to a safehouse to lay low until the threat was neutralized.”
  • In a spy novel, a character might say, “I have a safehouse in the mountains where we can regroup and plan our next move.”
  • A person discussing personal safety might suggest, “If you ever feel threatened, find a safehouse or a public place where you can seek help.”

48. Code Red

Code Red is a term used to indicate a high-level emergency or crisis situation, often related to security or safety. It is commonly used in various industries, including healthcare, military, and law enforcement, to alert personnel to a serious threat or problem that requires immediate attention or action.

  • For example, “When the fire alarm sounds and the announcement says ‘Code Red,’ everyone must evacuate the building.”
  • In a hospital setting, a nurse might say, “We’re going into Code Red. Prepare for incoming casualties.”
  • A security officer might radio, “We have a Code Red situation in progress. All available units respond immediately.”

49. Defcon

Defcon is a term derived from “Defense Readiness Condition” and is used to indicate the alert level of the United States Armed Forces. It is a scale ranging from 5 (lowest level of readiness) to 1 (highest level of readiness) and is used to assess the current threat level and readiness of military forces.

  • For instance, “The military has raised the Defcon level to 3 due to increased tensions with a foreign nation.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, one might say, “We’re currently at Defcon 4, which means there’s an elevated risk of cyber attacks.”
  • A military analyst might explain, “Defcon 1 is only declared in the event of imminent nuclear war or a major global conflict.”

50. Secure the perimeter

Securing the perimeter refers to the act of establishing a secure boundary or boundary control around a specific area or property. This is done to prevent unauthorized access, protect against potential threats, and maintain the security of the area.

  • For example, “The security team was instructed to secure the perimeter and ensure no one enters or exits the area.”
  • In a military operation, a commander might order, “Secure the perimeter and establish a defensive position.”
  • A security consultant might advise, “To enhance your home’s security, install a fence and security cameras to secure the perimeter.”

51. Locksmith

A locksmith is a professional who specializes in working with locks and keys. They are skilled in various tasks such as lock installation, lock repair, and lock picking.

  • For example, if you’re locked out of your house, you might need to call a locksmith to help you regain access.
  • A person discussing home security might say, “I need to hire a locksmith to install high-quality locks on my doors.”
  • In a conversation about lost keys, someone might mention, “I had to call a locksmith to make a new key for my car.”

52. Secure the vault

To “secure the vault” means to take measures to ensure the safety and protection of a secure storage space, typically used for storing valuable items such as money, jewelry, or important documents.

  • For instance, a bank employee might say, “We need to secure the vault before closing time.”
  • In a movie about a heist, a character might exclaim, “We need to secure the vault before the thieves arrive!”
  • A security guard might instruct their team, “Our priority is to secure the vault and monitor any suspicious activity.”

53. Lock it down

To “lock it down” means to take immediate action to secure and protect something or someone. It is often used to refer to ensuring the safety and integrity of a specific area or situation.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We need to lock it down and establish a perimeter around the crime scene.”
  • In a military operation, a commander might order, “Lock it down and maintain strict control of the area.”
  • A security guard might radio their colleagues, “Lock it down and don’t let anyone in or out until further notice.”

54. Safety first

This phrase emphasizes the importance of prioritizing safety and security above all else. It serves as a reminder to take necessary precautions and ensure the well-being of individuals and assets.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “Remember, safety first. Always wear your protective gear.”
  • In a workplace meeting, a manager might emphasize, “We need to make sure safety is our top priority in all our operations.”
  • A person discussing personal security might advise, “When traveling alone, always practice safety first by being aware of your surroundings and taking necessary precautions.”
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