Top 35 Slang For Self Hatred – Meaning & Usage

Self-hatred is a complex and unfortunately common emotion that many struggle with. It’s important to recognize and understand the various ways in which this feeling manifests in our daily lives.

Join us as we explore a curated list of slang terms for self-hatred that are prevalent in today’s culture. Let’s dive in and shed light on this important topic together.

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1. Self-loathing

Self-loathing refers to a deep and intense dislike or hatred towards oneself. It is a feeling of being disgusted or disappointed with one’s own thoughts, actions, or existence.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t stand to look at myself in the mirror, I’m filled with self-loathing.”
  • In a therapy session, a person might express, “I struggle with self-loathing and it’s affecting my relationships and self-esteem.”
  • A person experiencing self-loathing might write, “I hate everything about myself, I’m consumed by self-loathing.”

2. Self-deprecation

Self-deprecation is a form of humor or behavior where an individual makes fun of themselves or belittles their own abilities in order to downplay their accomplishments or seek validation from others.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m so clumsy, I trip over my own feet all the time” as a form of self-deprecation.
  • In a lighthearted conversation, a person might joke, “I’m the queen of procrastination, it’s my special talent.”
  • A comedian might use self-deprecation as part of their act, saying, “I’m not the brightest bulb in the box, as you can probably tell.”

3. Self-reproach

Self-reproach is the act of blaming oneself or feeling guilty for something that went wrong or for a mistake made. It involves criticizing and holding oneself accountable for perceived failures or wrongdoings.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t believe I messed up again, I’m filled with self-reproach.”
  • In a therapy session, someone might express, “I constantly engage in self-reproach, even for minor mistakes.”
  • A person experiencing self-reproach might write, “I can’t forgive myself for what I did, the self-reproach is eating me alive.”

4. Self-disgust

Self-disgust is a strong feeling of aversion or disgust towards oneself. It is a deep sense of repulsion or revulsion towards one’s own thoughts, appearance, or actions.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I hate myself so much, I’m filled with self-disgust.”
  • In a therapy session, a person might express, “I struggle with self-disgust and it’s impacting my mental health.”
  • A person experiencing self-disgust might write, “I can’t stand the sight of myself, the self-disgust is overwhelming.”

5. Self-criticism

Self-criticism is the act of analyzing and evaluating one’s own thoughts, actions, or abilities in a negative or harsh manner. It involves being overly critical of oneself and focusing on perceived flaws or shortcomings.

  • For example, someone might say, “I constantly criticize myself, it’s like I’m my own worst enemy.”
  • In a therapy session, a person might express, “I engage in excessive self-criticism, it’s affecting my self-esteem.”
  • A person experiencing self-criticism might write, “I can’t help but pick apart every little thing I do, the self-criticism is relentless.”

6. Self-contempt

Self-contempt refers to a strong feeling of dislike or disgust towards oneself. It is a deep-seated form of self-hatred that often stems from feelings of inadequacy or failure.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t stand myself. I’m filled with self-contempt.”
  • A person experiencing self-contempt might think, “I’m worthless and don’t deserve happiness.”
  • In therapy, a psychologist might help a client explore their self-contempt and work towards self-acceptance.

7. Self-hatred

Self-hatred is a strong and intense dislike or loathing towards oneself. It is a deep-rooted feeling of unworthiness and can lead to negative self-talk, self-destructive behaviors, and a lack of self-care.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I hate myself. I can’t do anything right.”
  • A person experiencing self-hatred might think, “I’m a failure and don’t deserve love or happiness.”
  • In therapy, a counselor might help a client challenge their self-hatred and develop self-compassion.

8. Self-rejection

Self-rejection refers to the act of refusing to accept oneself. It involves a denial of one’s own worth, value, or identity and can stem from feelings of shame, guilt, or unworthiness.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t stand who I am. I’m constantly in a state of self-rejection.”
  • A person experiencing self-rejection might think, “I’m not good enough and don’t deserve happiness.”
  • In therapy, a therapist might help a client explore the root causes of their self-rejection and work towards self-acceptance.

9. Self-blame

Self-blame is the act of holding oneself responsible for negative events or outcomes. It involves attributing fault or guilt to oneself, even when there may be other factors at play.

  • For instance, someone might say, “It’s all my fault. I always mess things up. I’m filled with self-blame.”
  • A person experiencing self-blame might think, “If only I had done things differently, this wouldn’t have happened.”
  • In therapy, a counselor might help a client challenge their self-blame and develop a more balanced perspective.
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10. Self-doubt

Self-doubt refers to a lack of confidence or belief in oneself. It involves questioning one’s abilities, worth, or decisions and can often lead to hesitation, indecisiveness, and a fear of failure.

  • For example, someone might say, “I doubt myself constantly. I’m filled with self-doubt.”
  • A person experiencing self-doubt might think, “I’m not capable of achieving success. I’ll never be good enough.”
  • In therapy, a psychologist might help a client challenge their self-doubt and develop self-confidence.

11. Self-pity

This term refers to the act of feeling sorry for oneself, often accompanied by a sense of victimhood or self-indulgence. It is a negative emotion that can lead to a cycle of self-pity and self-doubt.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m tired of wallowing in self-pity. It’s time to take control of my life.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, a person might advise, “Don’t let self-pity hold you back from achieving your goals.”
  • A therapist might encourage a patient by saying, “It’s important to acknowledge your feelings, but try not to dwell in self-pity for too long.”

12. Self-sabotage

This term refers to the act of consciously or unconsciously sabotaging one’s own efforts or success. It often stems from deep-rooted feelings of unworthiness or fear of failure.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I always self-sabotage when things start going well in my life.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might share, “I tend to self-sabotage by pushing away people who care about me.”
  • A therapist might help a client identify patterns of self-sabotage and develop strategies to overcome them.

13. Self-destructive

This term refers to engaging in behaviors that are harmful or detrimental to one’s own well-being, physically, emotionally, or mentally. It often arises from deep-seated feelings of self-hatred or low self-worth.

  • For example, a person struggling with self-destructive tendencies might say, “I engage in self-destructive behavior as a way to cope with my pain.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might share, “Self-destructive tendencies can be a sign of underlying emotional distress.”
  • A therapist might work with a client to develop healthier coping mechanisms and break the cycle of self-destructive behaviors.

14. Self-defeating

This term refers to engaging in actions or behaviors that ultimately hinder or undermine one’s own progress, success, or well-being. It often stems from a lack of self-confidence or a fear of failure.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have a habit of self-defeating behaviors that prevent me from reaching my goals.”
  • In a discussion about personal development, someone might share, “Self-defeating behaviors can be a major obstacle to personal growth.”
  • A life coach might help a client recognize self-defeating patterns and develop strategies to overcome them.

15. Self-derogation

This term refers to the act of putting oneself down or belittling oneself, often through negative self-talk or self-critical thoughts. It can contribute to feelings of self-hatred and low self-esteem.

  • For example, a person might say, “I constantly engage in self-derogation and it’s taking a toll on my mental health.”
  • In a discussion about self-acceptance, someone might share, “Self-derogation can have a detrimental impact on one’s overall well-being.”
  • A therapist might help a client challenge self-derogatory thoughts and develop a more positive self-image.

16. Self-flagellation

This term refers to the act of inflicting physical or emotional pain upon oneself as a form of punishment or penance. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who constantly criticizes or blames themselves.

  • For example, a person might say, “I engage in self-flagellation by constantly berating myself for my mistakes.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might advise, “Instead of self-flagellation, try practicing self-compassion and forgiveness.”
  • A therapist might address self-flagellation by saying, “We need to work on building your self-esteem and reducing self-criticism.”

17. Self-misery

This term describes a state of extreme unhappiness or emotional distress that a person intentionally imposes upon themselves. It can also refer to someone who constantly wallows in their own misery.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can’t seem to escape this cycle of self-misery.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might share, “I’ve been struggling with self-misery for years, but I’m working on finding healthier coping mechanisms.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “I hate seeing you trapped in self-misery. Let’s find ways to support each other.”

18. Self-reproval

This term refers to the act of blaming oneself or expressing disapproval and criticism towards oneself. It can also describe a constant state of self-condemnation or self-disapproval.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m stuck in a cycle of self-reproval where I can’t forgive myself for past mistakes.”
  • In a therapy session, a client might discuss self-reproval by saying, “I’ve realized that my constant self-reproval is holding me back from personal growth.”
  • A self-help book might offer advice on overcoming self-reproval, stating, “Practice self-compassion and challenge negative self-talk to break free from the cycle of self-reproval.”

19. Self-destruction

This term describes the act of intentionally harming oneself, whether physically, emotionally, or mentally. It can also refer to behaviors that undermine one’s own well-being or success.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I engage in self-destruction by engaging in risky behaviors that harm my health.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might share, “I’ve realized that my patterns of self-destruction are preventing me from reaching my goals.”
  • A therapist might address self-destruction by saying, “Let’s work on identifying healthier coping mechanisms to replace self-destructive behaviors.”

20. Self-inflicted

This term describes something that is caused or brought upon oneself. It can also refer to a situation or condition that is the result of one’s own actions or choices.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m dealing with the consequences of my self-inflicted wounds.”
  • In a conversation about personal responsibility, someone might note, “We need to take ownership of our self-inflicted challenges and work towards solutions.”
  • A therapist might discuss self-inflicted pain by saying, “Let’s explore the underlying reasons behind your self-inflicted behaviors and work towards healthier alternatives.”

21. Self-humiliation

This term refers to the act of belittling or making fun of oneself. It can be a form of humor or a way to express feelings of low self-esteem. – For instance, someone might say, “I always manage to embarrass myself in front of others. It’s just self-humiliation at this point.” – In a conversation about personal insecurities, a person might admit, “I use self-humiliation as a defense mechanism to avoid being vulnerable.” – A comedian might incorporate self-humiliation into their routine, joking, “I’m so clumsy that I trip over my own feet. It’s like self-humiliation on autopilot.”

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22. Self-revulsion

This term describes a strong feeling of disgust or repulsion towards oneself. It often stems from feelings of shame, guilt, or low self-worth. – For example, a person might say, “I can’t stand to look at myself in the mirror. It’s a constant battle with self-revulsion.” – In a therapy session, a client might express, “I struggle with self-revulsion because I feel like I’m not living up to my own expectations.” – A self-help book might address self-revulsion, offering strategies to overcome negative self-perception.

23. Self-abhorrence

This term refers to a strong feeling of hatred or loathing towards oneself. It often involves a deep-seated belief that one is unworthy or deserving of punishment. – For instance, a person might say, “I have such intense self-abhorrence that it’s hard to believe anyone could love me.” – In a support group, a participant might share, “I’ve been working on overcoming self-abhorrence and learning to practice self-compassion.” – A therapist might explore the root causes of self-abhorrence in a client, aiming to help them develop self-acceptance.

24. Self-derision

This term refers to the act of mocking or ridiculing oneself. It can be a way to cope with insecurities or to deflect criticism from others. – For example, a person might say, “I make so many mistakes that I’ve become an expert in self-derision.” – In a lighthearted conversation among friends, someone might jokingly say, “I’m the king of self-derision. No one can roast me better than myself.” – A writer might use self-derision in their work to add humor and relatability, saying, “I’m not the smartest person, but hey, self-derision makes for great material.”

25. Self-detestation

This term describes a strong feeling of dislike or aversion towards oneself. It often involves a deep-rooted belief that one is fundamentally flawed or unworthy of love and acceptance. – For instance, a person might say, “I struggle with self-detestation to the point where I can’t even look in the mirror without feeling disgusted.” – In a therapy session, a client might express, “My self-detestation is causing me to isolate myself from others and avoid any form of self-care.” – A motivational speaker might address self-detestation, offering strategies to cultivate self-compassion and self-acceptance.

26. Self-devaluation

Self-devaluation refers to the act of undervaluing or belittling oneself. It is a form of self-hatred where individuals diminish their own worth or importance.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m not good enough for anything. I always mess things up. It’s just self-devaluation.”
  • In a therapy session, a psychologist might address self-devaluation by saying, “We need to work on building your self-esteem and challenging these negative beliefs.”
  • A friend might notice someone engaging in self-devaluation and offer support, saying, “You’re so talented and capable. Don’t let self-devaluation hold you back.”

27. Self-abasement

Self-abasement refers to the act of humiliating or demeaning oneself. It involves purposely lowering one’s dignity or self-worth as a form of self-hatred.

  • For instance, someone might engage in self-abasement by saying, “I’m so stupid and worthless. I don’t deserve anything good.”
  • A therapist might address self-abasement by helping the individual explore the underlying reasons for this behavior and develop healthier coping mechanisms.
  • A friend might notice their friend engaging in self-abasement and express concern, saying, “You deserve better than this. Let’s work on building your self-esteem together.”

28. Self-repudiation

Self-repudiation refers to the act of rejecting or disowning oneself. It involves denying one’s own value or worth as a form of self-hatred.

  • For example, someone might engage in self-repudiation by saying, “I don’t deserve love or happiness. I’m a burden to everyone.”
  • A therapist might address self-repudiation by helping the individual challenge these negative beliefs and develop self-compassion.
  • A supportive friend might notice their friend’s self-repudiation and offer reassurance, saying, “You are worthy of love and happiness. Don’t let self-repudiation define you.”

29. Self-scorn

Self-scorn refers to the act of despising or ridiculing oneself. It involves harboring feelings of contempt or disdain towards oneself as a form of self-hatred.

  • For instance, someone might engage in self-scorn by saying, “I’m so pathetic and useless. I can’t do anything right.”
  • A therapist might address self-scorn by helping the individual challenge these negative self-perceptions and develop self-acceptance.
  • A caring friend might notice their friend’s self-scorn and offer support, saying, “You are not pathetic or useless. You have so many strengths and qualities.”

30. Self-rebuke

Self-rebuke refers to the act of criticizing or reproaching oneself. It involves being harshly self-critical and blaming oneself as a form of self-hatred.

  • For example, someone might engage in self-rebuke by saying, “I always mess things up. It’s all my fault.”
  • A therapist might address self-rebuke by helping the individual develop self-compassion and challenge their self-blame.
  • A supportive friend might notice their friend’s self-rebuke and offer encouragement, saying, “It’s not all your fault. We all make mistakes. Don’t be so hard on yourself.”

31. Self-disparagement

Self-disparagement refers to the act of criticizing or belittling oneself. It involves expressing negative thoughts or feelings about one’s own abilities, appearance, or worth.

  • For example, someone might engage in self-disparagement by saying, “I’m so stupid, I always mess things up.”
  • In a therapy session, a person might discuss their tendency for self-disparagement and how it affects their self-esteem.
  • A friend might notice their loved one engaging in self-disparagement and offer words of encouragement, saying, “You’re being too hard on yourself, you’re actually really talented.”

32. Self-inflicted wounds

Self-inflicted wounds refers to intentionally causing harm or pain to oneself, either physically or emotionally. This can take various forms, such as self-harm or engaging in self-destructive behaviors.

  • For instance, someone might engage in self-inflicted wounds by cutting themselves as a way to cope with emotional pain.
  • A therapist might discuss the dangers of self-inflicted wounds and work with their client to find healthier coping mechanisms.
  • A person might share their personal experience with self-inflicted wounds in a support group, seeking understanding and guidance.
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33. Self-censure

Self-censure refers to the act of criticizing or condemning oneself. It involves holding oneself accountable for perceived mistakes or shortcomings and engaging in self-blame.

  • For example, someone might engage in self-censure by saying, “I should have known better, it’s all my fault.”
  • In a group discussion about personal growth, a person might share their struggle with self-censure and how it hinders their progress.
  • A therapist might help their client challenge their self-censure and develop a more compassionate and forgiving mindset.

34. Self-ridicule

Self-ridicule refers to the act of mocking or making fun of oneself. It involves using humor or sarcasm to highlight one’s own perceived flaws or shortcomings.

  • For instance, someone might engage in self-ridicule by saying, “I’m such a klutz, I trip over my own feet all the time.”
  • Among friends, playful self-ridicule might be used as a way to bond and create a lighthearted atmosphere.
  • A comedian might incorporate self-ridicule into their stand-up routine, using it as a comedic tool to connect with the audience.

35. Self-resentment

Self-resentment refers to the feeling of anger or bitterness directed towards oneself. It involves harboring negative emotions and holding oneself responsible for perceived failures or mistakes.

  • For example, someone might experience self-resentment by saying, “I can’t believe I let myself get into this situation, I’m so mad at myself.”
  • In therapy, a person might explore their self-resentment and work towards self-forgiveness and acceptance.
  • A friend might notice their loved one’s self-resentment and offer support and understanding, saying, “It’s okay to make mistakes, we all do. Don’t be so hard on yourself.”