Top 33 Slang For Settle – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to finding the perfect word to describe that feeling of contentment and acceptance, we’ve got you covered. Whether you’re looking to chill with friends or cozy up with a good book, our team has curated a list of the top slang for settle that will have you feeling right at home in no time. So sit back, relax, and let’s explore the language of comfort together!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Come to terms

This phrase means to reach a mutual agreement or understanding with someone.

  • For example, in a negotiation, someone might say, “We finally came to terms on the contract.”
  • In a dispute, one person might suggest, “Let’s put our differences aside and come to terms.”
  • A business deal might be finalized with the statement, “After much negotiation, we were able to come to terms.”

2. Shake hands on it

This expression is used when two or more people agree on something and then confirm their agreement with a handshake.

  • For instance, after negotiating a deal, someone might say, “Let’s shake hands on it to seal the agreement.”
  • In a business transaction, both parties might shake hands and say, “We have a deal.”
  • When making a bet, someone might say, “If I win, you owe me $20. Shake on it?”

3. Close the deal

This phrase means to finalize or complete an agreement or transaction.

  • For example, in a sales context, someone might say, “I’m going to do my best to close the deal.”
  • In a business negotiation, one person might state, “We’re almost there. Let’s close the deal.”
  • A real estate agent might say, “I’m confident we can close the deal on this property.”

4. Wrap things up

This expression means to finish or conclude something, often in a timely manner.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s wrap things up so we can all get to our next appointments.”
  • In a project, one person might suggest, “We need to wrap things up by the end of the week.”
  • At the end of a conversation, someone might say, “Well, it was great catching up. Let’s wrap things up for now.”

5. Seal the deal

This phrase means to make an agreement official or binding, often with a formal action or gesture.

  • For example, in a business negotiation, someone might say, “Once we sign the contract, we’ll seal the deal.”
  • In a sales context, one person might state, “I’m confident this extra incentive will seal the deal.”
  • When finalizing a partnership, someone might say, “Let’s shake hands to seal the deal.”

6. Put it to rest

This phrase is used to indicate that a disagreement or problem has been resolved or settled. It implies that the matter is now closed and should no longer be a source of contention.

  • For example, after a heated argument, one person might say, “Let’s just put it to rest and move on.”
  • In a discussion about a long-standing disagreement, someone might suggest, “It’s time to put this issue to rest once and for all.”
  • A mediator in a conflict might advise, “The best way to find peace is to put the past to rest.”

7. Lay it to rest

Similar to “put it to rest,” this phrase means to settle a disagreement or problem. It implies that the matter should be laid to rest and no longer cause any further conflict or tension.

  • For instance, a person might say, “It’s time to lay this issue to rest and find a resolution.”
  • In a discussion about a long-standing argument, someone might suggest, “Let’s lay it to rest and focus on finding common ground.”
  • A mediator in a conflict might advise, “Both parties need to lay their grievances to rest in order to move forward.”

8. Bury the hatchet

This phrase means to put an end to a conflict or disagreement and make peace with the other party involved. It suggests that both parties should let go of any resentment or ill feelings and move on.

  • For example, after a long-standing feud, two people might decide to bury the hatchet and reconcile.
  • In a discussion about resolving conflicts, someone might say, “Sometimes, you just need to bury the hatchet and find a compromise.”
  • A mediator in a dispute might encourage the involved parties to “bury the hatchet and focus on finding a mutually beneficial solution.”
See also  Top 40 Slang For Directly After – Meaning & Usage

9. Squash the beef

This slang phrase means to settle or resolve a disagreement or conflict. It implies that the parties involved should put aside their differences and find a resolution.

  • For instance, two friends who had an argument might decide to squash the beef and make amends.
  • In a discussion about resolving conflicts, someone might say, “It’s important to squash the beef and maintain healthy relationships.”
  • A mediator in a dispute might advise the involved parties to “squash the beef and find common ground.”

10. Iron out the details

This phrase means to work out or resolve the specific details or aspects of a plan, agreement, or situation. It implies that there are still some unresolved issues or uncertainties that need to be addressed.

  • For example, in a business negotiation, someone might say, “We need to iron out the details before we can finalize the contract.”
  • In a discussion about planning an event, someone might suggest, “Let’s meet tomorrow to iron out the details.”
  • A project manager might say, “We’re almost there, we just need to iron out the remaining details before we can proceed.”

11. Sort things out

This phrase means to find a solution or come to an agreement in order to resolve a problem or disagreement.

  • For example, “Let’s sit down and sort things out before it gets worse.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We need to sort things out and find a compromise.”
  • When discussing a conflict, one might suggest, “We should sort things out and try to understand each other’s perspectives.”

12. Find common ground

This phrase means to discover shared interests, ideas, or beliefs in order to reach an agreement or understanding.

  • For instance, “Despite our differences, we were able to find common ground and work together.”
  • In a political debate, someone might say, “We need to find common ground and find solutions that benefit everyone.”
  • When discussing a relationship, one might advise, “Try to find common ground and focus on what you both value.”

13. Make peace

This phrase means to resolve conflicts or disagreements and establish a state of harmony or reconciliation.

  • For example, “After years of feuding, the two families finally made peace.”
  • In a diplomatic negotiation, someone might say, “Our goal is to make peace and end the conflict.”
  • When discussing personal relationships, one might suggest, “It’s important to make peace and forgive each other to move forward.”

14. Hash out

This phrase means to discuss or negotiate something in detail in order to reach a resolution or agreement.

  • For instance, “We need to sit down and hash out the details of the contract.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s hash out the plan and make sure everyone is on the same page.”
  • When discussing a disagreement, one might suggest, “We should hash out our differences and find a compromise.”

15. Wrap up

This phrase means to complete or finish something, often referring to the final stages of a process or task.

  • For example, “Let’s wrap up this meeting and summarize the key points.”
  • In a project, someone might say, “We’re almost done, just need to wrap up a few loose ends.”
  • When discussing a conversation, one might suggest, “Let’s wrap up this topic and move on to the next one.”

16. Nail down

This phrase means to firmly establish or conclude something. It can refer to reaching a decision or resolving a matter.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s nail down the details of this contract.”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might suggest, “We need to nail down our travel arrangements before the trip.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express certainty, saying, “I’ve nailed down the perfect recipe for chocolate chip cookies.”

17. Tie up loose ends

This expression means to complete or address all remaining tasks or issues, especially those that have been left unattended.

  • For instance, in a project meeting, someone might say, “We need to tie up the loose ends before presenting our work.”
  • In a conversation about moving, someone might mention, “I still have a few loose ends to tie up with canceling utilities and forwarding mail.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their workday, saying, “I’m staying late at the office to tie up some loose ends.”

18. Call it a day

This phrase is used to indicate that one has decided to finish working or participating in an activity for the day.

  • For example, at the end of a long workday, someone might say, “I’m exhausted. Let’s call it a day.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might suggest, “We’ve made good progress. Let’s call it a day and continue tomorrow.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express satisfaction with their accomplishments, saying, “We achieved our goals for today. Let’s call it a day.”

19. Reach an agreement

This phrase means to arrive at a consensus or understanding between two or more parties.

  • For instance, in a negotiation, someone might say, “After hours of discussion, we were finally able to reach an agreement.”
  • In a conversation about resolving a conflict, someone might mention, “We need to find common ground and reach an agreement.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe a successful outcome, saying, “Despite initial disagreements, we were able to reach an agreement that satisfied everyone.”

20. Put to rest

This phrase means to bring an end to something, often by resolving a conflict, addressing a problem, or dispelling doubts.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “Let’s put this issue to rest once and for all.”
  • In a discussion about a rumor, someone might state, “I can confirm that the rumors are false and put them to rest.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express relief or closure, saying, “I’m glad we were able to put the matter to rest and move on.”

21. Sort out

To resolve or fix a problem or situation. “Sort out” is often used when there is confusion or disarray that needs to be addressed.

  • For example, “Let’s sort out this misunderstanding before it causes more problems.”
  • In a discussion about organizing a team project, someone might suggest, “We need to sort out the roles and responsibilities.”
  • A friend might say, “We should sort out our plans for the weekend.”

22. Iron out

To resolve or fix a problem or disagreement through discussion and negotiation. “Iron out” is often used when there are differences or conflicts that need to be resolved.

  • For instance, “Let’s have a meeting to iron out the details of the contract.”
  • In a conversation about resolving a conflict, someone might say, “We need to iron out our differences and find a compromise.”
  • A colleague might suggest, “We should iron out the issues with our project timeline.”

23. Lay to rest

To resolve or bring an end to something, often a dispute or controversy. “Lay to rest” is often used when there is a need to settle or put an issue to rest.

  • For example, “Let’s have a meeting to lay to rest any lingering doubts or concerns.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We need to lay to rest the misconceptions and address the facts.”
  • A family member might suggest, “Let’s lay to rest any arguments or disagreements and focus on supporting each other.”

24. Square things away

To resolve or complete tasks or issues that need to be addressed. “Square things away” is often used when there are loose ends or unfinished business that need attention.

  • For instance, “Let’s square things away before moving on to the next project.”
  • In a conversation about finalizing plans, someone might say, “We need to square things away and make sure everyone is on the same page.”
  • A supervisor might suggest, “Let’s square things away before the end of the day to ensure a smooth transition.”

25. Clear the air

To address or resolve tensions or misunderstandings in a relationship or situation. “Clear the air” is often used when there is a need to address and resolve conflicts or disagreements.

  • For example, “Let’s have a conversation to clear the air and find a resolution.”
  • In a discussion about team dynamics, someone might suggest, “We need to clear the air and foster open communication.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s clear the air and talk about what’s been bothering us.”

26. Close the book

This phrase is used to indicate that a situation or issue has been resolved or concluded. It implies that there is no need for further discussion or action.

  • For example, after a long negotiation, one might say, “Let’s close the book on this and move on.”
  • In a disagreement between friends, someone might suggest, “We should close the book on this argument and focus on our friendship.”
  • When a decision has been made, someone might say, “I’m glad we could finally close the book on this and move forward.”

27. Reach a compromise

This phrase refers to the process of finding a solution or agreement that satisfies both parties involved in a disagreement or conflict. It often involves making concessions or finding a middle ground.

  • For instance, in a business negotiation, someone might propose, “Let’s try to reach a compromise that benefits both companies.”
  • In a political debate, a politician might say, “We need to reach a compromise on this issue in order to move forward.”
  • In a personal relationship, someone might suggest, “Let’s sit down and discuss our differences so we can reach a compromise.”

28. Put an end to

This phrase means to bring something to a close or resolution, typically in a decisive or final manner. It implies that there is no further need for action or discussion regarding the matter.

  • For example, in a conflict between two parties, someone might say, “It’s time to put an end to this and find a solution.”
  • In a long-standing argument, one person might declare, “I’m tired of this. Let’s put an end to it and move on.”
  • When a problem has been resolved, someone might announce, “We have put an end to this issue and can now focus on other matters.”

29. Reach an accord

This phrase refers to the process of coming to an agreement or understanding, often after a period of negotiation or discussion. It implies that both parties involved have reached a mutually acceptable resolution.

  • For instance, in a diplomatic negotiation, representatives might work to reach an accord that satisfies all parties involved.
  • In a business partnership, two companies might reach an accord on the terms of their collaboration.
  • In a personal relationship, two individuals might work to reach an accord on how to handle a particular issue.
See also  Top 65 Slang For Which – Meaning & Usage

30. Smooth over

This phrase means to resolve or pacify a conflict or disagreement in order to restore harmony or calm. It often involves addressing and resolving the underlying issues or tensions.

  • For example, in a heated argument, someone might say, “Let’s take a step back and try to smooth things over.”
  • In a workplace conflict, a manager might intervene to smooth over tensions between employees.
  • In a family dispute, a mediator might be brought in to help smooth over the disagreements and find common ground.

31. Strike a bargain

This phrase is used to describe the act of reaching a mutually beneficial agreement or settlement. It often implies that both parties have made compromises in order to come to a resolution.

  • For example, “After negotiating for hours, we finally managed to strike a bargain.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Let’s see if we can strike a bargain that works for both parties.”
  • A person discussing a successful negotiation might say, “We were able to strike a bargain that satisfied both sides.”

32. Fix up

This slang term is used to describe the act of resolving or settling a situation or problem. It implies taking action to fix or improve a situation.

  • For instance, “I need to fix up this issue before it gets worse.”
  • In a conversation about resolving a conflict, someone might say, “Let’s fix up this misunderstanding and move forward.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’m working on fixing up my life and making positive changes.”

33. Come to an understanding

This phrase is used to describe the act of reaching a mutual understanding or agreement with someone else. It implies that both parties have taken the time to communicate and empathize with each other’s perspectives.

  • For example, “After a long discussion, we were able to come to an understanding.”
  • In a relationship context, someone might say, “We need to sit down and come to an understanding about our expectations.”
  • A person discussing conflict resolution might say, “The key to resolving conflicts is to come to an understanding and find common ground.”