Top 35 Slang For Sick – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing how cool or awesome something is, the English language has a plethora of slang terms to choose from. But what about when you’re feeling under the weather? Fear not, as we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang words to describe feeling sick. So, whether you’re feeling “under the weather” or “rough as a badger’s backside,” we’ve got just the right words to help you navigate those not-so-great days. Let’s dive in and expand your vocabulary with some sick slang!

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1. Under the weather

This phrase is used to describe feeling unwell or mildly sick.

  • For example, “I won’t be able to come to work today, I’m feeling a bit under the weather.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling under the weather? You don’t look so good.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’ve been feeling under the weather all week, I think I caught a cold.”

2. Off color

This phrase is used to describe feeling slightly sick or not in the best health.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling a bit off color lately, I think I need to get some rest.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling off color today, I think I caught a bug.”
  • Someone might comment, “She’s been looking a bit off color lately, I hope she’s okay.”

3. Queasy

This term is used to describe feeling nauseous or having an upset stomach.

  • For example, “I can’t eat anything right now, I’m feeling queasy.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling queasy all morning, I think I ate something bad.”
  • Someone might comment, “The bumpy car ride made me feel queasy, I need to take a break.”

4. Lousy

This word is used to describe feeling generally unwell or sick.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling lousy all day, I think I’m coming down with something.”
  • A person might say, “I feel lousy today, I didn’t get enough sleep.”
  • Someone might comment, “Being stuck inside all day made me feel lousy, I need some fresh air.”

5. Out of sorts

This phrase is used to describe feeling out of the ordinary or not in the best condition.

  • For example, “I don’t know why, but I’ve been feeling out of sorts lately.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit out of sorts today, I think I need to take a break.”
  • Someone might comment, “She seemed a bit out of sorts at the party, I wonder if something is bothering her.”

6. Green around the gills

This phrase is used to describe someone who looks pale and sick, often due to feeling nauseous or unwell.

  • For example, “She was feeling green around the gills after eating that questionable seafood.”
  • A friend might say, “You don’t look so good, you’re green around the gills.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Are you feeling green around the gills? Do you need to lie down?”

7. Off one’s feed

This phrase is often used to describe someone or something that is not eating as they normally would, usually due to being unwell or sick.

  • For instance, “The dog has been off his feed for the past few days.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t been feeling well lately, I’m off my feed.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Are you off your feed? Do you want some soup?”

8. Ailing

This term is used to describe someone who is experiencing illness or poor health, either physically or mentally.

  • For example, “She has been ailing for weeks, with no improvement in her condition.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit ailing today, I think I caught a cold.”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient by saying, “Based on your symptoms, it seems like you’re ailing.”

9. Peakish

This word is used to describe someone who is feeling slightly unwell or not at their optimal health.

  • For instance, “She’s been looking a bit peakish lately, I hope she’s okay.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit peakish today, I think I’m coming down with something.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling peakish? Do you need anything?”

10. Off one’s game

This phrase is used to describe someone who is not performing at their usual level, often due to feeling unwell or being distracted.

  • For example, “He’s been off his game lately, making a lot of mistakes.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t sleep well last night, so I’m a bit off my game.”
  • A coach might say to a player, “You seem off your game today, is everything okay?”

11. Off-kilter

This term is used to describe something or someone that is not in the usual or expected state. It can refer to physical or mental states.

  • For example, “After staying up all night, I feel a bit off-kilter today.”
  • Someone might say, “The painting is intentionally off-kilter to create a sense of unease.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s behavior, one might comment, “He’s been acting a bit off-kilter lately.”

12. Off one’s rocker

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in a strange or irrational manner.

  • For instance, “She’s completely off her rocker if she thinks she can fly.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s behavior, one might say, “He’s off his rocker for quitting his stable job.”
  • A person might comment, “You must be off your rocker to believe such a wild conspiracy theory.”

13. Wonky

This word is used to describe something that is not functioning properly or is unstable.

  • For example, “The table is wonky and wobbles when you put something on it.”
  • In a conversation about technology, one might say, “My phone’s battery is wonky; it randomly dies even when it’s fully charged.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t trust this wonky car to get me to my destination.”

14. Knackered

This term is used to describe a state of extreme fatigue or exhaustion.

  • For instance, “I’ve been working non-stop for 12 hours; I’m absolutely knackered.”
  • In a discussion about a physically demanding activity, one might say, “After running a marathon, I was completely knackered.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t go out tonight; I’m too knackered from a long day at work.”

15. Off-colour

This phrase is used to describe a state of being unwell or slightly sick.

  • For example, “I’m feeling a bit off-colour today; I think I caught a cold.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s health, one might say, “She’s been off-colour for the past few days; I hope she feels better soon.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t go to the party tonight; I’m feeling a bit off-colour.”

16. Feeling off

This phrase is used to describe a general sense of not feeling well, but without any specific symptoms or illness being identified.

  • For example, “I woke up this morning feeling off. I think I might be coming down with something.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling off all day. I think I need to rest and take it easy.”
  • Someone might describe their symptoms as, “I have a headache and just feel off overall.”

17. Rough

When someone says they feel rough, they mean that they are not feeling well, often due to illness or fatigue.

  • For instance, “I went out last night and drank too much. I’m feeling rough today.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling rough all week. I think I caught a cold.”
  • Someone might describe their symptoms as, “I have a sore throat, cough, and just feel really rough.”

18. Poorly

This term is often used to describe someone who is not feeling well or is experiencing symptoms of illness.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling poorly all day. I think I might have caught a bug.”
  • A person might say, “My child is feeling poorly and has a high fever.”
  • Someone might describe their symptoms as, “I feel nauseous, fatigued, and overall poorly.”

19. Down with something

When someone says they are down with something, they mean that they are currently suffering from an illness or experiencing symptoms.

  • For instance, “I can’t come to work today. I’m down with the flu.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been down with a cold for the past week.”
  • Someone might describe their symptoms as, “I have a fever, body aches, and I’m down with something.”

20. Off sick

When someone is off sick, it means they are taking time off from work or other responsibilities due to being unwell.

  • For example, “I won’t be able to come to the meeting tomorrow. I’m off sick.”
  • A person might say, “He’s been off sick for the past few days with a stomach bug.”
  • Someone might explain their absence by saying, “I’m sorry I couldn’t make it. I’ve been off sick with the flu.”

21. Sick as a dog

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very sick or feeling unwell.

  • For example, “I caught the flu and I’ve been sick as a dog for the past week.”
  • Another example, “She ate some bad seafood and was sick as a dog all night.”
  • One more example, “After the roller coaster ride, he felt sick as a dog.”

22. Off one’s food

This phrase is used to describe someone who doesn’t feel like eating or has a decreased desire for food.

  • For instance, “Ever since she got the flu, she’s been off her food.”
  • Another example, “He’s been off his food lately, I think he might be coming down with something.”
  • One more example, “When I’m stressed, I tend to be off my food.”

23. Feeling under the weather

This phrase is used to describe someone who is slightly unwell or not feeling their best.

  • For example, “I think I’m coming down with a cold, I’ve been feeling under the weather all day.”
  • Another example, “She’s been feeling under the weather, so she decided to stay home and rest.”
  • One more example, “He’s been feeling under the weather for a few days now, I hope he gets better soon.”

24. Laid up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is unable to perform their usual activities because of being sick or injured.

  • For instance, “He broke his leg and has been laid up in bed for the past month.”
  • Another example, “I caught a bad cold and I’ve been laid up at home, unable to go to work.”
  • One more example, “After the surgery, she was laid up for several weeks, recovering.”

25. Feeling peaky

This phrase is used to describe someone who appears pale or unwell.

  • For example, “You look a bit peaky, are you feeling okay?”
  • Another example, “He’s been feeling peaky all day, I think he might be coming down with something.”
  • One more example, “After a night of little sleep, she woke up feeling peaky and exhausted.”

26. Run down

When someone is “run down,” they are feeling exhausted or lacking energy. It can also refer to feeling physically or mentally unwell.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours all week and I’m feeling really run down.”
  • Someone might say, “I think I’m getting sick. I’ve been feeling run down and achy.”
  • Another person might comment, “I always feel run down after a busy weekend.”

27. Out of commission

When someone is “out of commission,” they are unable to perform their usual tasks or activities due to illness or injury.

  • For instance, “I caught a bad cold and I’m going to be out of commission for a few days.”
  • A person might say, “I sprained my ankle, so I’ll be out of commission for the soccer game.”
  • Another might comment, “My computer crashed, so I’m out of commission until I can get it fixed.”

28. Feeling poorly

When someone is “feeling poorly,” it means they are not feeling well or are experiencing symptoms of illness.

  • For example, “I ate something that didn’t agree with me and now I’m feeling poorly.”
  • A person might say, “I have a headache and a fever. I’m feeling really poorly.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m feeling poorly, so I’m going to stay home from work today.”

29. Feeling green

When someone is “feeling green,” it means they are feeling nauseous or sick to their stomach.

  • For instance, “I ate too much at lunch and now I’m feeling green.”
  • A person might say, “I get motion sickness easily, so I often feel green on long car rides.”
  • Another might comment, “The smell of seafood always makes me feel green.”

30. Feeling lousy

When someone is “feeling lousy,” it means they are feeling unwell or sick, usually with mild symptoms.

  • For example, “I have a sore throat and a stuffy nose. I’m feeling lousy.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t sleep well last night, so I’m feeling lousy today.”
  • Another might comment, “I have a headache and body aches. I’m feeling really lousy.”

31. Feeling punk

This phrase is often used to describe feeling physically ill or under the weather.

  • For example, “I woke up this morning feeling punk, so I decided to stay home from work.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling punk? You don’t look well.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been feeling punk all day. I think I caught a cold.”

32. Feeling crummy

This phrase is used to describe feeling physically or emotionally unwell.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling crummy all week. I think I caught a bug.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t come to the party tonight. I’m feeling crummy.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s wrong? You seem like you’re feeling crummy.”

33. Down with the flu

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is currently experiencing symptoms of the flu.

  • For example, “I can’t come into the office today. I’m down with the flu.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been down with the flu for the past week. It’s been terrible.”
  • A friend might ask, “How are you feeling? I heard you’re down with the flu.”

34. Feeling rough

This phrase is used to describe feeling physically or emotionally unwell.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling rough today. I didn’t get much sleep last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling rough all week. I can’t seem to shake this cold.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling rough? You look tired.”

35. Feeling like death warmed up

This phrase is used to emphasize feeling extremely ill or unwell.

  • For example, “I have a terrible headache, body aches, and a fever. I feel like death warmed up.”
  • A person might say, “After a night of heavy drinking, I woke up feeling like death warmed up.”
  • A friend might ask, “How are you feeling? You look like death warmed up.”
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