Top 52 Slang For Sleep – Meaning & Usage

Getting a good night’s sleep is essential for our overall well-being, but sometimes it can be elusive. That’s why we’ve gathered the top slang words and phrases for sleep to help you understand the language of slumber. From “catching some z’s” to “hitting the hay,” this listicle will not only introduce you to the coolest sleep-related slang, but also provide you with a few chuckles along the way. So, get cozy and prepare to drift off into a world of slumberous words!

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1. Catch Winks

This phrase is often used to describe taking a quick nap or getting some much-needed rest. It implies that the person will be sleeping for a short period of time.

  • For example, “I’m feeling so tired, I think I’ll catch a few winks before dinner.”
  • A friend might say, “I caught a few winks on the train ride home.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can I catch a few winks on your couch?”

2. Hit The Hay

This phrase is a playful way of saying that someone is going to bed or getting ready to sleep. It often implies that the person is tired and ready for a good night’s sleep.

  • For instance, “I’m exhausted, I think it’s time to hit the hay.”
  • A parent might say to a child, “It’s past your bedtime, time to hit the hay.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you ready to hit the hay?”

3. Call It A Night

This phrase is commonly used to indicate that someone is ending their activities for the night and going to sleep. It suggests that the person has had enough for the day and is ready to rest.

  • For example, “I’ve had a long day, I think I’ll call it a night.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m tired, let’s call it a night and go home.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you ready to call it a night?”

4. Cat Nap

This phrase is used to describe a short period of sleep or a brief nap. It implies that the person will only be sleeping for a short amount of time.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling drowsy, I think I’ll take a cat nap.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’m going to take a quick cat nap during my lunch break.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have time for a cat nap?”

5. Crash

This slang term is used to describe falling asleep quickly and deeply. It suggests that the person is very tired and falls asleep without any difficulty.

  • For example, “I was so exhausted that I crashed as soon as I got home.”
  • A friend might say, “I crashed on the couch last night and didn’t wake up until morning.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you crash as soon as you got into bed?”

6. Doze Off

When you doze off, you briefly fall asleep or take a quick nap without intending to do so.

  • For example, “I was so tired after work that I dozed off on the couch.”
  • If someone is struggling to stay awake, you might say, “You should go lie down and doze off for a bit.”
  • During a boring lecture, a student might doze off at their desk.

7. Gouch

To gouch means to fall asleep, typically after using drugs that induce drowsiness or sedation.

  • For instance, “After taking that medication, I gouched on the couch for hours.”
  • If someone is nodding off after using drugs, you might say, “Looks like they’re gouching pretty hard.”
  • A person might describe their experience with a sedating drug by saying, “I took it and immediately gouched.”

8. Hit The Sack

When you hit the sack, you go to bed or fall asleep. It’s a casual way of referring to the act of getting ready for sleep.

  • For example, “I’m exhausted. I think I’m going to hit the sack early tonight.”
  • If someone asks what your plans are for the evening, you might reply, “I’m going to hit the sack soon.”
  • After a long day, you might say, “I can’t wait to hit the sack and get some rest.”

9. Kip

To kip means to take a short sleep or nap, usually during the day.

  • For instance, “I’m going to kip for a bit before the party tonight.”
  • If someone asks what you did over the weekend, you might say, “I just relaxed and kipped most of the time.”
  • During a long car ride, a passenger might say, “Wake me up when we get there. I’m going to kip in the backseat.”

10. Loaf

To loaf means to sleep or laze around, often for an extended period of time.

  • For example, “I’m going to loaf in bed all day. I deserve a lazy Sunday.”
  • If someone is spending the day at home doing nothing, you might say, “They’re just loafing around.”
  • After a tiring week, you might declare, “I’m taking a day off work to loaf and recharge.”

11. Out Cold

This phrase refers to being in a state of deep and uninterrupted sleep. It suggests that the person is completely unaware of their surroundings and is sleeping soundly.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I was out cold as soon as my head hit the pillow.”
  • In a conversation about someone who sleeps deeply, one might say, “Once he falls asleep, he’s out cold for the whole night.”
  • A person might boast, “I can sleep through anything. I’m out cold within minutes.”

12. Saw Wood

This phrase is used to describe the sound of someone snoring. It suggests that the person is sleeping heavily and making loud snoring noises.

  • For instance, “My dad saws wood so loudly that it wakes up the whole house.”
  • In a discussion about annoying sleep habits, someone might say, “I can’t stand it when my partner saws wood all night.”
  • A person might complain, “I couldn’t get any sleep because my roommate was sawing wood all night.”

13. Shut-Eye

This term is a casual way of referring to sleep. It implies that the person is closing their eyes and going to sleep.

  • For example, “I need to get some shut-eye before my early morning flight.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of sleep, someone might say, “I always make sure to get at least eight hours of shut-eye.”
  • A person might suggest, “If you’re feeling tired, take a quick nap to get some shut-eye.”

14. Siesta

This term refers to a short nap taken in the afternoon, typically after lunch. It is common in some cultures, especially in warm climates, to take a siesta to rest and recharge.

  • For instance, “In Spain, it’s common to take a siesta after lunch.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might say, “I wish we had siestas like they do in some countries.”
  • A person might suggest, “If you’re feeling tired in the afternoon, try taking a short siesta to boost your energy.”

15. Winks

This term is used to describe a short and quick sleep, often lasting just a few minutes. It implies that the person is able to fall asleep easily and wake up feeling refreshed.

  • For example, “I can always take a few winks on the train during my commute.”
  • In a conversation about power napping, someone might say, “I can recharge with just a few winks.”
  • A person might boast, “I can take a quick nap and wake up feeling like I’ve had a full night’s sleep.”

16. Zizz

A short period of sleep, usually during the day. “Zizz” is a slang term used to describe a quick and refreshing nap.

  • For example, “I’m going to take a quick zizz before dinner.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel so much better after a 20-minute zizz.”
  • A person discussing the benefits of napping might mention, “A zizz can help improve productivity and alertness.”

17. Zonked

Feeling extremely tired or worn out. “Zonked” is a slang term used to describe a state of extreme fatigue.

  • For instance, “I had a long day at work and I’m completely zonked.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m too zonked to do anything.”
  • Someone might describe their exhaustion by saying, “After running a marathon, I was absolutely zonked.”

18. Catch some Z’s

To go to sleep or get some rest. “Catch some Z’s” is a slang phrase often used to suggest the act of sleeping.

  • For example, “I’m going to catch some Z’s before the big day.”
  • A person might say, “I need to catch some Z’s to recharge for tomorrow.”
  • Someone might suggest, “If you’re feeling tired, you should catch some Z’s.”

19. Snooze

A short period of sleep, usually during the day. “Snooze” is a slang term used to describe a brief and light sleep.

  • For instance, “I’m just going to take a quick snooze on the couch.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel refreshed after a 15-minute snooze.”
  • Someone might mention, “I like to take a snooze during my lunch break to recharge.”

20. Rack out

To fall asleep or go to bed. “Rack out” is a slang phrase often used to describe the act of going to sleep.

  • For example, “I’m so tired, I’m going to rack out early tonight.”
  • A person might say, “After a long day, all I want to do is rack out.”
  • Someone might mention, “I usually rack out within minutes of getting into bed.”

21. Saw logs

This phrase refers to snoring loudly while sleeping. It is often used to describe someone who snores so loudly that it sounds like they are sawing logs.

  • For example, “My roommate snores so loudly, it’s like he’s sawing logs all night.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t sleep because my dad was sawing logs in the next room.”
  • Another might joke, “I could hear my grandpa sawing logs from across the house.”

22. Catch some shut-eye

This expression means to get some sleep or take a nap. It is often used when someone needs to rest or take a break from their activities.

  • For instance, “I need to catch some shut-eye before my big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m exhausted. I’m going to go catch some shut-eye.”
  • Another might suggest, “You should catch some shut-eye before we continue our road trip.”

23. Count sheep

This phrase refers to a technique used to help fall asleep. It involves visualizing a series of sheep jumping over a fence and counting them in your mind. The repetitive nature of this activity is believed to help calm the mind and induce sleep.

  • For example, “I couldn’t sleep last night, so I tried counting sheep.”
  • A person might say, “Whenever I have trouble falling asleep, I count sheep.”
  • Another might suggest, “If you’re having trouble sleeping, try counting sheep. It really works!”

24. Catch forty winks

This phrase means to take a short nap or get a brief period of sleep. It is often used when someone needs a quick rest or recharge.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling tired. I’m going to catch forty winks before dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I only have a few minutes. I’m going to catch forty winks in my car.”
  • Another might suggest, “If you’re feeling exhausted, try catching forty winks. It can make a big difference in your energy levels.”

25. Sawing wood

This phrase is another way to describe snoring loudly while sleeping. It compares the sound of snoring to the noise made when cutting or sawing wood.

  • For example, “I couldn’t sleep because my partner was sawing wood all night.”
  • A person might say, “My dad snores so loudly, it’s like he’s sawing wood.”
  • Another might joke, “I could hear my neighbor sawing wood through the walls.”

26. Get some shuteye

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying “get some sleep”. It is often used to suggest that someone should rest or take a nap.

  • For example, a parent might tell their child, “It’s time to get some shuteye, you have school tomorrow.”
  • A friend might say to another, “You look exhausted, you should go home and get some shuteye.”
  • A coworker might suggest, “If you’re feeling tired, maybe you should take a break and get some shuteye.”

27. Take a nap

This phrase refers to the act of resting or sleeping for a short period of time, usually during the day.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’m going to take a nap before studying for my exam.”
  • A person feeling tired at work might say, “I need to take a quick nap during my lunch break.”
  • Someone might suggest, “If you’re feeling exhausted, maybe you should take a power nap to recharge.”

28. Go to dreamland

This phrase is a playful way of saying “go to sleep”. It is often used when talking to children or in a lighthearted manner.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “It’s time to go to dreamland, sweetie.”
  • A friend might suggest, “I’m exhausted, let’s go to dreamland and get some rest.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I’m ready to go to dreamland and have some wild dreams tonight.”

29. Slumber

This word is a more formal and poetic way of saying “sleep”. It is often used to describe a peaceful and deep sleep.

  • For instance, a writer might describe a character as “slumbering peacefully”.
  • A person might say, “I need to get some slumber tonight, I have a busy day tomorrow.”
  • Someone might comment, “The sound of rain always helps me drift off into a deep slumber.”

30. Sawing logs

This phrase is a humorous way of describing someone who is snoring loudly while they sleep.

  • For example, a person might say, “My dad snores so loudly, it sounds like he’s sawing logs.”
  • A friend might joke, “I couldn’t sleep at all last night because my roommate was sawing logs.”
  • Someone might comment, “I always feel sorry for the person who has to sleep next to someone who’s sawing logs all night.”

31. Forty winks

This phrase refers to a short, quick nap or sleep. It implies a brief period of rest or relaxation.

  • For example, “I need to take forty winks before the meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “I only have time for forty winks before I have to get ready.”
  • Another might ask, “Can I borrow your couch for a quick forty winks?”

32. Nod off

To nod off means to fall asleep unintentionally or to start to fall asleep. It often happens when someone is tired or bored.

  • For instance, “I kept nodding off during the boring lecture.”
  • A person might say, “I always nod off during long car rides.”
  • Another might admit, “I tend to nod off while watching TV late at night.”

33. Dreamland

Dreamland refers to a state of deep sleep or a place where dreams occur. It can also be used figuratively to describe a state of bliss or happiness.

  • For example, “I’m ready to go to dreamland after a long day.”
  • A person might say, “I had some strange dreams in dreamland last night.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m in dreamland right now, everything is perfect.”

34. Sandman’s visit

The Sandman’s visit refers to falling asleep, as if the mythical character known as the Sandman is sprinkling sand or dust in one’s eyes to induce sleep.

  • For instance, “I’m looking forward to the Sandman’s visit tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I can feel the Sandman’s visit coming, I’m getting sleepy.”
  • Another might ask, “Did the Sandman pay you a visit last night? You look well-rested.”

35. Beauty sleep

Beauty sleep refers to the idea that sleep is important for maintaining one’s appearance and overall beauty. It implies that getting enough sleep can improve one’s physical appearance.

  • For example, “I need to get my beauty sleep before the big event.”
  • A person might say, “I always make sure to prioritize my beauty sleep.”
  • Another might comment, “You look refreshed, must have gotten some beauty sleep.”

36. Beddy-bye

This term is a childish way to refer to going to sleep or getting ready for bed. It is often used when talking to or about young children.

  • For example, a parent might say, “It’s time for beddy-bye, sweetie.”
  • A babysitter might ask, “Are you ready for your beddy-bye?”
  • A person might say, “I’m exhausted. I can’t wait to crawl into beddy-bye tonight.”

37. In the arms of Morpheus

This phrase is a poetic way to describe being in a deep sleep. It references Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After a long day, I can’t wait to be in the arms of Morpheus.”
  • A person might describe a restful night by saying, “I slept soundly and was in the arms of Morpheus.”
  • A tired individual might say, “I’m going to bed early tonight so I can be in the arms of Morpheus.”

38. Catch some shuteye

This expression means to get some sleep, often in the form of a short nap or rest. It implies a quick period of sleep to rejuvenate.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to catch some shuteye before my next meeting.”
  • A person might mention, “I always feel refreshed after catching some shuteye.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can I catch some shuteye on the couch?”

39. Zonk out

To “zonk out” means to fall asleep quickly and suddenly, often due to exhaustion or fatigue.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I was so tired that I zonked out as soon as I hit the pillow.”
  • A person might describe a long day by saying, “I can’t wait to go home and zonk out.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you see him zonk out during the movie?”

40. Grab some winks

This phrase means to take a short nap or get some rest, often for a brief period of time.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m just going to grab some winks before we continue.”
  • A person might mention, “I always feel more alert after grabbing some winks.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can I grab some winks in your office?”

41. Cop some Z’s

This phrase is a playful way of saying “get some sleep.” The “Z’s” refer to the Z-shaped lines that are often used to depict someone sleeping in cartoons or comics.

  • For example, “I’m so exhausted, I need to cop some Z’s.”
  • A friend might say, “You look tired, you should go home and cop some Z’s.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you cop enough Z’s last night?”

42. Hit the pit

This slang phrase means to go to bed or to go to sleep. The “pit” refers to a comfortable place to rest or sleep, similar to how a pit can be a comfortable spot for an animal.

  • For instance, “I’m exhausted, I’m going to hit the pit.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to hit the pit after a long day.”
  • Someone might ask, “What time are you hitting the pit tonight?”

43. Take a siesta

This phrase comes from the Spanish word for “nap.” It refers to taking a short period of rest or sleep, usually during the afternoon.

  • For example, “I’m going to take a siesta after lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel refreshed after a siesta.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you take siestas on the weekends?”

44. Go to the land of dreams

This poetic phrase means to go to sleep and enter the world of dreams. It emphasizes the idea of sleep as a journey to another realm.

  • For instance, “It’s time to go to the land of dreams.”
  • A parent might say to a child, “Close your eyes and go to the land of dreams.”
  • Someone might ask, “What do you dream about when you go to the land of dreams?”

45. Get some rack

This slang phrase means to get some rest or to go to sleep. The term “rack” is a colloquial term for a bed or a place to sleep.

  • For example, “I’m so tired, I need to get some rack.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to get some rack before the big day.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you get enough rack last night?”

46. Go to the land of nod

This phrase is a playful and whimsical way to say “go to sleep.” It references the idea of drifting off into a peaceful slumber.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “It’s time to go to the land of nod, sweetie.”
  • In a conversation with a friend, you could say, “I’m exhausted, I can’t wait to go to the land of nod tonight.”
  • When discussing the importance of sleep, someone might say, “Getting enough rest is essential for our health, so make sure you regularly go to the land of nod.”

47. Go to the sandman

This phrase refers to the mythical character known as the “Sandman,” who is said to sprinkle sand or dust on people’s eyes to make them fall asleep.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “After your bath, it’s time to go to the sandman.”
  • In a casual conversation, you could say, “I’m so tired, I can’t wait to go to the sandman tonight.”
  • When discussing different ways to relax before bed, someone might suggest, “Try reading a book or listening to soothing music to help you go to the sandman.”

48. Go to the arms of Morpheus

This phrase references Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams. It suggests finding comfort and rest in the embrace of sleep.

  • For example, a grandparent might say, “Now it’s time for you to go to the arms of Morpheus, my little dreamer.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of a good night’s sleep, you could say, “I always strive to go to the arms of Morpheus early to wake up refreshed.”
  • When discussing different bedtime routines, someone might mention, “Taking a warm bath before bed helps me relax and go to the arms of Morpheus.”

49. Go to beddy-bye

This phrase is a playful and childlike way to say “go to sleep.” It is often used when speaking to young children or in a lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “It’s time to go to beddy-bye, little one.”
  • In a casual conversation, you could say, “I’m so tired, I can’t wait to go to beddy-bye tonight.”
  • When discussing the importance of establishing a consistent sleep schedule, someone might say, “Going to beddy-bye at the same time every night can improve the quality of your sleep.”

50. Go to the sack

This phrase uses the word “sack” as a metaphor for a bed or a place of rest. It is a casual and informal way to say “go to sleep.”

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’m exhausted, I can’t wait to go to the sack tonight.”
  • In a conversation about the benefits of a good night’s sleep, you could say, “Getting enough restful hours in the sack is crucial for our overall well-being.”
  • When discussing different strategies for falling asleep, someone might suggest, “Try creating a peaceful and comfortable environment in your bedroom to help you go to the sack.”

51. Go to the hay

This phrase is a playful way of saying “go to sleep.” It is derived from the idea of laying down in a bed of hay, which was a common sleeping arrangement in the past.

  • For instance, a parent might tell their child, “It’s time to go to the hay, it’s getting late.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’m exhausted, I can’t wait to go to the hay.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you get a good night’s sleep? Did you go to the hay early?”

52. Go to the pit

This phrase is a slang term for “go to sleep.” The word “pit” is used metaphorically to represent a deep hole or a resting place.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m so tired, I can’t wait to go to the pit.”
  • In a casual conversation, a friend might ask, “Did you get enough sleep? Did you go to the pit early?”
  • A parent might tell their child, “It’s getting late, time to go to the pit and get some rest.”
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