Top 91 Slang For Small Bottle Of Alcohol – Meaning & Usage

If you’ve ever found yourself at a party or a bar, wondering what to call that mini bottle of alcohol, you’re not alone. We’ve all been there, struggling to find the right words to describe that convenient, pocket-sized drink. Well, worry no more! We’ve done the research and compiled a list of the top slang terms for small bottles of alcohol. Get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge and never be at a loss for words again!

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1. Mini

A small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. The term “mini” is often used to refer to these small bottles, which are convenient for travel or sampling different types of alcohol.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s pass around the minis and try a little bit of everything.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Would you like a mini bottle of champagne to celebrate?”
  • When packing for a trip, a traveler might say, “I always bring a few minis of my favorite spirits.”

2. Nip

A slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, usually referring to a small flask or bottle that holds a single serving. “Nip” is commonly used in the United States to describe these small bottles.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I keep a nip of whiskey in my pocket for emergencies.”
  • At a liquor store, a customer might ask, “Do you have any nips of vodka?”
  • A person sharing their drinking habits might say, “I like to have a nip of tequila before bed.”

3. Shot

A term used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol that contains a single serving, typically measured as a shot. These bottles are often used for convenience and portion control.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s do shots with these mini bottles.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Do you want a shot of whiskey or a full-sized drink?”
  • In a conversation about drinking games, someone might suggest, “Let’s play shot roulette with these mini bottles.”

4. Miniature

A small bottle of alcohol, often used to describe a bottle that is smaller than the standard size. “Miniature” is a term that emphasizes the small size of the bottle.

  • For instance, a collector might say, “I have a collection of miniature bottles from different distilleries.”
  • A person discussing party planning might suggest, “We can use miniature bottles as party favors.”
  • In a discussion about alcohol packaging, someone might mention, “Miniature bottles are popular for airlines and hotels.”

5. Pony

A term used to describe a small bottle of alcohol, typically holding less than the standard size. “Pony” is a colloquial term often used in the United States.

  • For example, at a bar, a customer might ask, “Do you have any pony bottles of beer?”
  • A person discussing their drinking habits might say, “I like to have a pony of whiskey before bed.”
  • When planning a picnic, someone might suggest, “Let’s bring some pony bottles of wine for convenience.”

6. Flask

A flask is a small, usually cylindrical container used for carrying a small amount of alcohol. It is designed to be portable and discreet, making it convenient for taking drinks on the go.

  • For example, “He pulled out his flask and took a swig of whiskey.”
  • In a conversation about sneaking alcohol into a concert, someone might say, “I always bring a flask to save money on drinks.”
  • A person discussing their travel essentials might mention, “A flask is a must-have for long flights.”

7. Dram

A dram is a Scottish term for a small measure of whiskey, typically equal to about 1/8 of a fluid ounce. It refers to a small amount of alcohol, often served neat or used in cocktails.

  • For instance, “I’ll have a dram of scotch, please.”
  • In a discussion about whiskey tasting, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite dram?”
  • A person describing their experience at a whiskey distillery might say, “We got to sample several different drams during the tour.”

8. Taster

A taster is a small portion of alcohol that is meant for sampling or trying a specific drink. It is often used in tasting events or when someone wants to try a variety of drinks without consuming a full serving.

  • For example, “The bartender offered me a taster of their new craft beer.”
  • In a conversation about wine tasting, someone might say, “I love trying different tasters to discover new flavors.”
  • A person discussing their favorite brewery might mention, “They always have a great selection of tasters.”

9. Sample

A sample refers to a small quantity of alcohol that is provided for trying or testing. It is often given out for free at liquor stores or during promotional events to give customers a taste of a particular product.

  • For instance, “I got a sample of the new vodka at the store.”
  • In a discussion about trying different types of beer, someone might say, “I love going to breweries and getting samples.”
  • A person describing their experience at a whiskey festival might mention, “There were so many samples to try, I couldn’t taste them all.”

10. Half-pint

A half-pint refers to a small bottle of alcohol that contains half of a pint, or approximately 8 fluid ounces. It is a common size for individual servings of spirits or fortified wines.

  • For example, “He ordered a half-pint of beer at the bar.”
  • In a conversation about buying alcohol for a party, someone might ask, “Should we get a few half-pints for mixers?”
  • A person discussing their favorite cocktail might mention, “I always use a half-pint bottle of vodka for my martinis.”

11. Snifter

A snifter is a small glass used for drinking a shot of alcohol. It is typically shaped like a miniature wine glass with a short stem and a wide bowl. The term “snifter” is often used to refer to a shot glass in colloquial language.

  • For example, at a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Can I get a snifter of whiskey?”
  • A person hosting a party might say, “I’ll bring out the snifters for everyone to do a toast.”
  • In a conversation about drinking games, someone might suggest, “Let’s take a shot using snifters instead of regular shot glasses.”

12. Swig

To take a swig means to drink a small amount of alcohol in one gulp. It is a slang term often used to describe taking a quick and casual drink.

  • For instance, a person at a party might say, “I’ll just take a swig of this beer to quench my thirst.”
  • In a discussion about alcohol preferences, someone might ask, “Do you prefer to sip or swig your whiskey?”
  • A friend might offer, “Take a swig of this cocktail I just made. It’s delicious!”

13. Sipper

A sipper is a person who drinks alcohol in small sips. It is a term used to describe someone who enjoys slowly savoring their drink rather than taking large gulps.

  • For example, at a wine tasting event, a sommelier might say, “This wine is perfect for sipper enthusiasts.”
  • In a conversation about drinking habits, someone might say, “I’m more of a sipper than a chugger.”
  • A person hosting a dinner party might ask, “Are there any sipper cocktails you’d like me to make?”

14. Chaser

A chaser is a beverage consumed immediately after taking a shot of alcohol. It is used to “chase” or mask the strong taste of the alcohol. A chaser is typically a non-alcoholic drink, such as water, soda, or juice.

  • For instance, at a bar, a customer might order a shot of tequila with a chaser of lime juice.
  • In a conversation about drinking strategies, someone might suggest, “Take a shot of vodka and follow it with a chaser of orange juice.”
  • A friend might offer, “Here’s a chaser of soda to have after your whiskey shot.”

15. Tottle

A tottle is a small bottle of alcohol, typically holding a single serving or shot. It is a slang term often used to refer to miniature bottles of alcohol that are convenient for travel or individual consumption.

  • For example, a person might say, “I always keep a tottle of whiskey in my bag for emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about alcohol packaging, someone might mention, “Tottles are popular for airlines because they are compact and easy to serve.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Where can I buy tottles of local spirits as souvenirs?”

16. Dose

A small amount of alcohol, typically consumed quickly. “Dose” is a slang term often used to refer to a small bottle or shot of alcohol.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s do a dose of tequila to kick off the night!”
  • A bartender might ask, “Would you like a dose of whiskey to go with your beer?”
  • In a conversation about drinking habits, someone might admit, “I can’t resist taking a dose of vodka before bed.”

17. Tot

A small measure of an alcoholic drink, typically referring to a small bottle or shot. “Tot” is a slang term commonly used to describe a small amount of alcohol.

  • For instance, a bartender might ask, “Can I get you a tot of rum?”
  • In a discussion about drinking preferences, someone might say, “I prefer taking a tot of whiskey instead of a full glass.”
  • A person might share their evening routine, saying, “I like to wind down with a tot of brandy before bed.”

18. Piccolo

A small bottle of champagne, typically holding a quarter of a standard-sized bottle. “Piccolo” is a slang term often used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol, specifically champagne.

  • For example, at a celebration, someone might say, “Let’s pop open a piccolo of champagne to toast!”
  • In a discussion about gift ideas, someone might suggest, “A piccolo of champagne makes a great party favor.”
  • A person might reminisce, “I remember sharing a piccolo of champagne with my friends on New Year’s Eve.”

19. Tiddly

Slightly intoxicated or tipsy from consuming a small amount of alcohol. “Tiddly” is a slang term used to describe a mild level of intoxication.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had a tiddly drink and felt relaxed.”
  • In a conversation about the effects of alcohol, one might comment, “A tiddly feeling can be quite enjoyable.”
  • A person might admit, “I don’t like getting drunk, but a tiddly state is nice for socializing.”

20. Wee dram

A small amount of whiskey, typically poured into a glass or shot glass. “Wee dram” is a slang term commonly used to refer to a small serving of whiskey.

  • For example, at a whiskey tasting event, a server might offer, “Would you like a wee dram to sample?”
  • In a discussion about whiskey preferences, someone might say, “I enjoy a wee dram of single malt scotch.”
  • A person might describe their evening routine, saying, “I like to unwind with a wee dram of bourbon after dinner.”

21. Finger

A “finger” is a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single shot or serving. The term “finger” is often used when referring to a small bottle of spirits or liquor.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll have a finger of whiskey, please.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Do you have any fingers of vodka?”
  • A person discussing their drinking habits might say, “I usually just have a finger or two of rum before bed.”

22. Jigger

A “jigger” is a small measuring device used in bartending to pour an accurate amount of alcohol. It is also used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving.

  • For instance, a bartender might say, “I’ll pour you a jigger of gin for your cocktail.”
  • In a recipe for a drink, it might specify, “Add one jigger of tequila.”
  • A person at a party might ask, “Can I have a jigger of rum in my drink?”

23. Snort

In the context of slang for a small bottle of alcohol, “snort” refers to taking a quick drink or shot of alcohol. It implies consuming a small amount of alcohol in a short period of time.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s do a snort of whiskey to kick off the night.”
  • At a party, a person might offer their friends, “Anyone up for a snort of vodka?”
  • A group of friends might challenge each other, “Let’s see who can do the fastest snort of tequila!”

24. Swally

A “swally” is a Scottish slang term for a small amount of alcohol, often referring to a sip or a drink. It can also be used to describe a small bottle of alcohol.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll have a wee swally of whisky.”
  • In a pub, a person might ask the bartender, “Can I get a swally of beer?”
  • A friend might offer, “Do you want a swally of my wine?”

25. Tiddler

A “tiddler” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically referring to a tiny or miniature bottle. It is often used to describe a small serving size of alcohol.

  • For example, someone might say, “I brought a tiddler of champagne to celebrate.”
  • At a party, a person might ask, “Does anyone have a tiddler of gin I can use for my cocktail?”
  • A traveler might comment, “I love collecting tiddlers of local spirits from different countries.”

26. Totty

A “totty” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically referring to a miniature bottle. It is often used in informal settings or among friends to describe a small-sized alcohol container.

  • For example, “I brought a few totties to the party for everyone to try.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any totties left? I need a quick drink.”
  • In a conversation about alcohol preferences, someone might say, “I prefer totties because they’re easy to carry around.”

27. Tumbler

A “tumbler” is a slang term for a small bottle or flask of alcohol. It is commonly used to refer to a small-sized container that can easily fit in a pocket or bag.

  • For instance, “He took a quick swig from his tumbler before heading out.”
  • In a discussion about drinking on the go, someone might mention, “I always carry a tumbler in case I need a quick sip.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any tumblers with you? I forgot mine at home.”

28. Wee nip

A “wee nip” is a slang term for a small bottle or shot of alcohol. It is often used to describe a tiny amount of alcohol, typically consumed in one gulp.

  • For example, “He downed a wee nip of whiskey to warm himself up.”
  • In a conversation about drinking habits, someone might say, “I like to start with a wee nip before moving on to larger drinks.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any wee nips? I want to try a variety of flavors.”

29. Wee one

A “wee one” is a slang term for a small bottle or drink of alcohol. It is commonly used to refer to a small-sized alcoholic beverage.

  • For instance, “She ordered a wee one to enjoy with her meal.”
  • In a discussion about alcohol preferences, someone might mention, “I prefer wee ones because they’re easier to finish.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any wee ones? I want to try something new.”

30. Wee swally

A “wee swally” is a slang term for a small bottle or swig of alcohol. It is often used to describe a quick and small amount of alcohol consumed in one go.

  • For example, “He took a wee swally to calm his nerves.”
  • In a conversation about drinking habits, someone might say, “I like to have a wee swally before bed.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any wee swallies? I need a quick pick-me-up.”

31. Wee tipple

This term refers to a small amount of alcohol, usually in the form of a small bottle or glass. It is often used to describe a small, enjoyable drink.

  • For example, “I’ll just have a wee tipple before bed.”
  • In a conversation about alcohol preferences, someone might say, “I prefer a wee tipple of whiskey.”
  • A person might offer a guest, “Would you like a wee tipple to warm you up?”

32. Wee drop

This slang term is used to describe a small amount of alcohol, typically in the form of a small bottle or shot. It emphasizes the small size of the drink.

  • For instance, “I’ll just have a wee drop of rum.”
  • In a discussion about drinking habits, someone might say, “I like to have a wee drop of whiskey before bed.”
  • A person might ask, “Can I pour you a wee drop of wine?”

33. Wee glass

This term refers to a small glass of alcohol, typically containing a small amount of liquid. It is commonly used to refer to a small serving of a drink.

  • For example, “I’ll have a wee glass of champagne to celebrate.”
  • In a conversation about cocktails, someone might say, “A wee glass of gin is perfect for a martini.”
  • A person might ask a bartender, “Could I get a wee glass of whiskey, please?”

34. Mickey

This slang term is used to describe a small bottle of alcohol, usually in reference to a small bottle of liquor. It is commonly used in North America.

  • For instance, “I bought a mickey of vodka for the party.”
  • In a discussion about drinking preferences, someone might say, “I prefer to buy mickeys of whiskey instead of larger bottles.”
  • A person might ask, “Could you grab me a mickey of rum from the store?”

35. Half pint

This term refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing half a pint of liquid. It is commonly used to describe a small serving of beer or cider.

  • For example, “I’ll have a half pint of lager, please.”
  • In a conversation about pub drinks, someone might say, “I prefer to order half pints of craft beer.”
  • A person might ask a bartender, “Could I get a half pint of cider, please?”

36. Sampler

A sampler is a small bottle of alcohol used for tasting or sampling different flavors or brands. It is commonly used in the beverage industry to offer customers a small portion of a product before purchasing a full-sized bottle.

  • For example, at a whiskey tasting event, attendees might be given a sampler of different types of whiskey to try.
  • In a cocktail bar, a bartender might offer a sampler of different cocktails to help customers decide what they want to order.
  • A liquor store might have a sampler pack of mini bottles featuring different types of alcohol.
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37. Tottie

Tottie is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically referring to miniature bottles that contain a single serving. These small bottles are often used for convenience or for mixing cocktails in precise measurements.

  • For instance, at a party, guests might be served totties instead of full-sized bottles to minimize waste and allow for a variety of drink options.
  • In a hotel mini-bar, there might be totties of different spirits available for guests to enjoy.
  • A person might say, “I always keep a few totties in my bag for a quick drink on the go.”

38. Dinky

Dinky is a slang term used to describe a small bottle of alcohol. It implies that the bottle is cute or small in size.

  • For example, a person might say, “I found these dinky bottles of champagne, perfect for a celebration.”
  • In a restaurant, a waiter might offer dinky bottles of liqueur to accompany desserts.
  • A party host might provide dinky bottles of spirits as party favors or as part of a gift bag.

39. Titchy

Titchy is a slang term used to describe a small flask or bottle of alcohol. It suggests that the flask is small in size, often implying that it can easily fit in a pocket or purse.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I always carry a titchy flask of whiskey with me for emergencies.”
  • In a camping trip, someone might bring titchy flasks of different spirits to enjoy around the campfire.
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any titchy bottles of vodka? I need some for a cocktail recipe.”

40. Totsy

Totsy is a slang term used to describe a small bottle of alcohol, specifically referring to mini bottles used for shots. These tiny bottles are often served in bars or clubs as a quick and convenient way to consume a single shot of alcohol.

  • For example, a person might say, “I ordered a round of totsies for everyone at the table.”
  • In a party, a host might provide totsy bottles of different liquors for guests to create their own shots.
  • A bartender might ask, “Do you want your shot in a regular glass or a totsy bottle?”

41. Smidgen

A “smidgen” refers to a tiny or minuscule amount of alcohol. It is often used to describe a small bottle or serving size of alcohol.

  • For example, “I only had a smidgen of whiskey left in the bottle.”
  • When discussing a small amount of alcohol, someone might say, “Just pour me a smidgen.”
  • In a cocktail recipe, you might see the instruction, “Add a smidgen of vermouth.”

42. Dainty

In the context of alcohol, “dainty” refers to a small and delicate serving size. It is often used to describe a small bottle or glass of alcohol.

  • For instance, “She sipped on a dainty glass of champagne.”
  • When ordering a drink, someone might request, “I’ll have a dainty pour of scotch.”
  • In a restaurant, a menu might offer “dainty-sized cocktails” as a lighter option.

43. Nipper

A “nipper” is a colloquial term for a small bottle or flask of alcohol. It typically refers to a small, portable container that holds a single serving of alcohol.

  • For example, “He pulled out a nipper of vodka from his pocket.”
  • When discussing travel, someone might mention, “I always carry a nipper of whiskey with me.”
  • In a conversation about party favors, someone might suggest, “We should give out personalized nippers of tequila.”

44. Tidbit

In the context of alcohol, a “tidbit” refers to a small and tasty serving size. It is often used to describe a small bottle or shot of alcohol that is enjoyed as a treat or indulgence.

  • For instance, “She savored a tidbit of fine cognac.”
  • When discussing a special occasion, someone might say, “Let’s celebrate with tidbits of champagne.”
  • In a cocktail recipe, you might see the instruction, “Garnish with a tidbit of lemon peel.”

45. Sip

When referring to a small bottle of alcohol, “sip” describes the action of taking a small, slow drink. It can also refer to a small serving size of alcohol that is meant to be sipped rather than consumed quickly.

  • For example, “She enjoyed a leisurely sip of her favorite whiskey.”
  • When offering someone a drink, someone might say, “Take a sip of this fine wine.”
  • In a tasting event, a sommelier might instruct, “Take small sips to fully appreciate the flavors.”

46. Dribble

This term refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. It is called a “dribble” because it is meant to be consumed in small sips or dribbles.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s pass around the dribbles for a taste of each type of liquor.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Do you have any dribbles of whiskey?”
  • A friend might offer, “I have a few dribbles of vodka left if you want to take a shot.”

47. Nip-nip

This slang term is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. It is called “nip-nip” because it is meant to be quickly consumed or “nipped” in one or two sips.

  • For instance, at a gathering, someone might say, “I brought some nips of tequila for everyone.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Do you have any nips of rum? I want to try a new brand.”
  • In a bar, a customer might request, “Can I get a couple of nips of whiskey, please?”

48. Chug

This term is used to describe a small bottle of alcohol, typically consumed in one go or “chugged.” It is often referred to as a “chug” because it is meant to be quickly consumed without sipping or savoring.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s do a chug challenge with these shots.”
  • A person might ask their friends, “Who’s up for a round of chugs? I’ve got some vodka shots.”
  • In a bar, a customer might order, “Give me a few chugs of tequila, please.”

49. Chugger

This slang term is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. It is called a “chugger” because it is meant to be quickly consumed or “chugged” in one go.

  • For instance, at a gathering, someone might say, “I brought some chuggers of whiskey for everyone.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Do you have any chuggers of rum? I want to try a new brand.”
  • In a bar, a customer might request, “Can I get a couple of chuggers of vodka, please?”

50. Sipperoo

This term is used to describe a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. It is called a “sipperoo” because it is meant to be sipped and enjoyed slowly.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “I brought some sipperoos of wine for everyone to enjoy.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Do you have any sipperoos of whiskey? I want to try a new brand.”
  • In a bar, a customer might request, “Can I get a couple of sipperoos of gin, please?”

51. Sip-sip

This term refers to a small bottle of alcohol that is meant to be sipped or consumed slowly. It can also be used to describe taking a small sip of alcohol from a larger bottle or container.

  • For example, “I picked up a couple of sip-sips to enjoy during the party.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to get too drunk, so I’ll just have a sip-sip.”
  • In a conversation about different alcohol options, someone might ask, “Do they sell sip-sips at the liquor store?”

52. Guzzle

While typically used to describe drinking a large amount of alcohol quickly, “guzzle” can also be used to refer to consuming a small bottle of alcohol in one go. It implies a rapid and enthusiastic consumption of the beverage.

  • For instance, “He guzzled down the small bottle of whiskey in one gulp.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to guzzle this mini bottle of vodka before we head out.”
  • In a party setting, someone might exclaim, “Let’s guzzle these mini bottles of champagne to celebrate!”

53. Guzzle-guzzle

This term is an intensified version of “guzzle” and refers to drinking a small bottle of alcohol in one swift motion. It emphasizes the act of quickly consuming the beverage.

  • For example, “He guzzle-guzzled the mini bottle of tequila and immediately asked for another.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling adventurous tonight, so I’ll guzzle-guzzle this small bottle of rum.”
  • In a drinking game, someone might suggest, “Let’s guzzle-guzzle these mini bottles of beer and see who finishes first!”

54. Tipple

“Tipple” is a slang term used to describe a small bottle of alcohol, typically one that contains a single serving. It can also refer to the act of consuming a small amount of alcohol.

  • For instance, “She enjoyed a tipple of whiskey before bed.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a few tipples in my bag for emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about different types of alcohol, someone might ask, “Have you tried any interesting tipples lately?”

55. Tiddlywink

This term is a playful slang for a small bottle of alcohol. It often implies a sense of fun and lightheartedness when referring to the beverage.

  • For example, “She pulled out a tiddlywink and offered it to her friends.”
  • A person might say, “I love carrying tiddlywinks in my pocket for a quick pick-me-up.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might ask, “Who wants a tiddlywink to kick off the party?”

56. Tiddleroo

This term refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. “Tiddleroo” is a playful and informal way to describe these small bottles.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “I brought a bunch of tiddleroos for everyone to enjoy.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Do you have any tiddleroos I can take with me?”
  • A person discussing their travel essentials might mention, “I always pack a few tiddleroos for a quick pick-me-up on the go.”

57. Shooter

A “shooter” is a small bottle of alcohol intended to be consumed in one shot. These bottles typically contain a single serving of alcohol.

  • For instance, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s do some shooters to kick off the night.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Can I get a couple of shooters, please?”
  • A person discussing their favorite drinks might mention, “I love trying different flavors of shooters at the local distillery.”

58. Nipperkin

A “nipperkin” is a small container or bottle of alcohol. It is often used to refer to a small, pocket-sized bottle that holds a single serving of alcohol.

  • For example, at a picnic, someone might say, “I brought a few nipperkins of whiskey.”
  • In a liquor store, a customer might ask the clerk, “Do you have any nipperkins of vodka?”
  • A person discussing their camping essentials might mention, “I always pack a few nipperkins of rum for a cozy night by the fire.”

59. Baby bottle

A “baby bottle” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol. The term is often used to highlight the small size of the bottle, similar to a baby’s bottle.

  • For instance, at a party, someone might say, “I brought some baby bottles of tequila for everyone.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Do you have any baby bottles of rum?”
  • A person discussing their collection of unique alcohol bottles might mention, “I have a few baby bottles from different distilleries.”

60. Snorter

A “snorter” is a small vial or container of alcohol that is typically consumed in one go. The term “snorter” can also refer to a small bottle of strong alcohol.

  • For example, at a gathering, someone might say, “Let’s do some snorters to kick off the night.”
  • In a club, a person might ask their friend, “Did you bring any snorters with you?”
  • A person discussing unique drinking traditions might mention, “In some cultures, they use snorters to celebrate special occasions.”

61. Quickie

A “quickie” refers to a small bottle of alcohol that is consumed quickly or on the go. It is often used to describe a small, portable bottle that can be easily finished in a short amount of time.

  • For example, “I always keep a quickie in my bag for emergencies.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s grab a quickie before heading to the party.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Do you have any quickies available?”

62. Mini-me

A “mini-me” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, often used to refer to miniature versions of popular alcoholic beverages. The term is a play on words, referencing the smaller size of the bottle compared to the regular-sized version.

  • For instance, “I love collecting mini-me bottles of different spirits.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a mini-me in my pocket for a quick drink.”
  • In a liquor store, a customer might ask, “Do you have any mini-me bottles of whiskey?”

63. Tiny tipple

A “tiny tipple” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. The term “tipple” refers to a small alcoholic drink, and “tiny” emphasizes the small size of the bottle.

  • For example, “I enjoy a tiny tipple of rum after dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I always carry a tiny tipple in my purse for emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about party favors, someone might suggest, “We should give out tiny tipples as gifts.”

64. L’il drink

A “l’il drink” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically referring to a single-serving size. The term “l’il” is a casual abbreviation of “little,” emphasizing the small size of the drink.

  • For instance, “I could use a l’il drink to unwind after work.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a l’il drink in my desk for celebrations.”
  • At a gathering, someone might ask, “Does anyone want a l’il drink to toast?”

65. Pocket-sized

A “pocket-sized” refers to a small bottle of alcohol that is small enough to fit in one’s pocket. The term emphasizes the convenient and portable nature of the bottle.

  • For example, “I always carry a pocket-sized bottle of vodka for emergencies.”
  • A person might say, “I love the convenience of pocket-sized bottles for traveling.”
  • In a discussion about camping, someone might suggest, “Don’t forget to pack some pocket-sized drinks for the trip.”

66. Itty-bitty booze

This term refers to a small bottle or serving of alcohol. It is often used to describe a small, single-serving bottle or container of alcohol.

  • For example, “I brought some itty-bitty boozes for the party.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a couple of itty-bitty boozes in my bag for emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might mention, “I love collecting itty-bitty boozes from different countries.”

67. Lushie

This slang term is used to describe someone who enjoys drinking small bottles of alcohol. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, “She’s a total lushie when it comes to those mini bottles.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a proud lushie. I love trying out different flavors.”
  • In a conversation about party essentials, someone might mention, “Don’t forget to stock up on mini bottles for the lushies.”

68. Quaff

This word can be used to describe the act of drinking a small bottle of alcohol in one go or with enthusiasm. It implies a sense of enjoyment and satisfaction.

  • For example, “He quaffed the itty-bitty booze and let out a contented sigh.”
  • A person might say, “I love quaffing those mini bottles after a long day.”
  • In a discussion about drinking habits, someone might mention, “I prefer to quaff my alcohol rather than sip it slowly.”

69. Swill

This term is used to describe the act of drinking a small bottle of alcohol quickly and without much regard for taste or quality. It implies a sense of haste or desperation.

  • For instance, “He swilled down the itty-bitty booze and immediately reached for another.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t have time to savor it, I’ll just swill this mini bottle.”
  • In a conversation about party games, someone might suggest, “Let’s see who can swill their mini bottle the fastest.”

70. Gulp

This word can be used to describe the act of drinking a small bottle of alcohol in one or a few large swallows. It implies a sense of urgency or thirst.

  • For example, “She gulped down the itty-bitty booze and asked for another.”
  • A person might say, “I was so thirsty, I couldn’t help but gulp the mini bottle.”
  • In a discussion about drinking preferences, someone might mention, “I prefer to gulp my alcohol rather than sip it slowly.”

71. Slurp

This refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically consumed in one gulp. The term “slurp” is often used to describe the action of quickly drinking the shot.

  • For instance, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s do some slurps to kick off the night!”
  • In a bar, a person might order, “Two shots of tequila, please. Slurps all around!”
  • A friend might challenge you, saying, “I bet you can’t do five slurps in a row!”

72. Sipperini

A slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. “Sipperini” is a playful term that emphasizes the small size of the bottle and suggests sipping rather than quickly consuming.

  • For example, at a party, someone might ask, “Who wants a sipperini of vodka?”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a few sipperinis in my bag for emergencies.”
  • When offering a drink to a friend, you might say, “Care for a sipperini of whiskey?”

73. Tasteroo

A slang term for a small bottle of alcohol that allows someone to taste or sample a particular drink. “Tasteroo” suggests trying a small amount of the beverage to get a sense of its flavor or quality.

  • For instance, at a wine tasting event, someone might say, “Here’s a tasteroo of our latest vintage.”
  • A bartender might offer, “Would you like a tasteroo of our new cocktail?”
  • When sharing a new drink with a friend, you might say, “I brought some tasteroos of this amazing craft beer.”

74. Nipperoo

A slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. “Nipperoo” emphasizes the small size of the bottle and suggests taking a small sip or nip of the drink.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “I’ve got a few nipperoos of rum if anyone’s interested.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any nipperoos of vodka in your fridge?”
  • When offering a drink to a friend, you might say, “Here’s a nipperoo of whiskey to warm you up.”

75. Nippity

A slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, often used to describe a bottle that is smaller than the standard size. “Nippity” emphasizes the tiny size of the bottle.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found these nippity bottles of champagne for the celebration.”
  • A person might ask, “Do they sell nippity bottles of gin at the liquor store?”
  • When showing off a collection of mini bottles, you might say, “Check out my nippity bottle display!”

76. Dosey

A “dosey” refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. This slang term is often used to describe a small, portable bottle that is convenient for carrying and consuming on the go.

  • For example, a person might say, “I always keep a dosey in my purse for emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about party supplies, someone might ask, “Did you bring any doseys for the pregame?”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s each grab a dosey and enjoy some drinks by the beach.”

77. Doser

A “doser” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, usually containing a single serving. This term is commonly used to describe miniature bottles that are often found in hotel minibars or sold as part of variety packs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I love collecting dosers from different brands.”
  • In a discussion about travel essentials, a person might mention, “I always pack a few dosers in my carry-on.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Would you like a full-sized drink or a doser to start?”

78. Swigger

A “swigger” refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically used for discreetly carrying and consuming liquor. This slang term often implies that the bottle is small enough to fit in a pocket and can be easily accessed for a quick drink.

  • For example, a person might say, “I always keep a swigger handy for a little pick-me-up.”
  • In a conversation about sneaking alcohol into events, someone might suggest, “Just bring a swigger and keep it hidden.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have a swigger we can use to take a shot?”

79. Guzzle-roo

A “guzzle-roo” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically used for taking a quick shot. This term often implies that the bottle is small enough to be consumed in one gulp, making it easy to “guzzle” down the contents.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s do a round of guzzle-roos to kick off the night.”
  • In a discussion about party games, a person might suggest, “We should play a game where everyone takes a guzzle-roo at once.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Would you like a guzzle-roo to start or a full-sized drink?”

80. Guzzleberry

A “guzzleberry” is a slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically carried for personal consumption. This term often conveys the idea of enjoying the alcohol in a casual, relaxed manner, as if savoring the flavor of a berry.

  • For example, a person might say, “I always keep a guzzleberry in my jacket for a quick drink.”
  • In a conversation about outdoor activities, someone might suggest, “Let’s bring some guzzleberries for a picnic.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any guzzleberries left? I could use a little pick-me-up.”

81. Swiggy

This term is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. It is often used in a casual or playful context.

  • For example, “I picked up a swiggy of whiskey for the party.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a swiggy in my bag for emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might mention, “I love taking swiggies of local spirits as souvenirs.”

82. Swiggy-roo

This slang term is a variation of “swiggy” and is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “I brought a swiggy-roo to share with friends.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s each grab a swiggy-roo and toast to the good times.”
  • In a conversation about party essentials, someone might mention, “Don’t forget to stock up on swiggy-roos for the night.”

83. Sipper-roo

This slang term is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol that is meant to be sipped slowly, typically containing a higher quality or more expensive spirit.

  • For example, “I treated myself to a sipper-roo of aged whiskey.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer enjoying a sipper-roo of fine bourbon after dinner.”
  • In a discussion about whiskey tasting, someone might mention, “I tried a fantastic sipper-roo at a whiskey tasting event.”

84. Tottleroo

This slang term is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol that is meant to be consumed quickly or in one go, often for a quick buzz or as a party shot.

  • For instance, “Let’s do a round of tottleroos to kick off the night.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a few tottleroos in my pocket for a pick-me-up.”
  • In a conversation about party games, someone might suggest, “Let’s play a game where everyone has to finish a tottleroo the fastest.”

85. Drammy

This slang term is used to refer to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a high-proof spirit, that is meant to be consumed for a dramatic or intense experience.

  • For example, “I took a drammy of absinthe to set the mood.”
  • A person might say, “I love the intense flavors of a good drammy of cask-strength whiskey.”
  • In a discussion about unique drinking experiences, someone might mention, “I once tried a drammy of a rare and potent spirit.”

86. Flasky

This term refers to a small bottle or container used to carry a small amount of alcohol. It is commonly used to discreetly transport alcohol.

  • For example, “I always keep a flasky in my bag for a quick drink on the go.”
  • In a conversation about party essentials, someone might say, “Don’t forget to bring a flasky with you.”
  • A friend might offer, “I have a spare flasky if you need one.”

87. Sipper-doodle

A slang term for a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. The term “sipper-doodle” implies that the drinker takes small sips or drinks slowly.

  • For instance, “I bought a few sipper-doodles for the road trip.”
  • In a discussion about alcohol preferences, someone might say, “I prefer sipper-doodles over regular-sized bottles.”
  • A partygoer might suggest, “Let’s each bring a few sipper-doodles to share.”

88. Tottley-wottley

This slang term refers to a small bottle of alcohol, usually containing a single serving. The term “tottley-wottley” is often used in a playful or humorous context.

  • For example, “I found a tottley-wottley in my jacket pocket from last night.”
  • In a conversation about party supplies, someone might ask, “Do we have enough tottley-wottleys for everyone?”
  • A friend might joke, “I’m a fan of tottley-wottleys because they’re easier to hide.”

89. Guzzle-doodle

This slang term is used to describe a small bottle of alcohol that can easily be consumed in one or a few gulps. The term “guzzle-doodle” implies quick and enthusiastic consumption.

  • For instance, “I always keep a guzzle-doodle in my pocket for emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about party tricks, someone might say, “Watch me chug this guzzle-doodle in one go!”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s have a guzzle-doodle race and see who finishes first.”

90. Swiggy-doodle

This slang term refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically used for taking shots. The term “swiggy-doodle” implies taking a quick and casual swig of the drink.

  • For example, “I brought a few swiggy-doodles to the pregame.”
  • In a conversation about drinking games, someone might suggest, “Let’s use swiggy-doodles for the shots.”
  • A partygoer might ask, “Does anyone have an extra swiggy-doodle? Mine’s empty.”

91. Nipper-doodle

This term refers to a small bottle of alcohol, typically containing a single serving. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I brought a few nipper-doodles to the party to share.”
  • In a conversation about alcohol preferences, someone might say, “I prefer to drink nipper-doodles instead of full-sized bottles.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any nipper-doodles left? I could use a quick drink.”