Top 32 Slang For Snitch – Meaning & Usage

Snitching, the act of betraying someone’s trust or revealing their secrets, is a delicate topic that can have serious consequences. Curious about the slang terms used to describe a snitch? Look no further! We’ve rounded up a list of the most popular and colorful slang for snitch that will have you in the know and maybe even help you navigate those tricky situations. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into the world of snitch slang with us!

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1. Rat

This term is used to describe someone who provides information to authorities or other people in order to betray or expose others. It is often used in criminal contexts.

  • For example, “He’s a rat who sold out his friends to the police.”
  • In a discussion about undercover operations, someone might say, “Rats play a crucial role in gathering intelligence.”
  • A character in a crime novel might warn, “Watch out for the rats lurking in the shadows.”

2. Snitch

A snitch is someone who informs on others, often to gain favor or avoid punishment. It implies a sense of betrayal or disloyalty.

  • For instance, “He’s known as a snitch who can’t be trusted.”
  • In a conversation about school, someone might say, “Nobody likes a snitch who tells the teacher about everything.”
  • A character in a movie might threaten, “If you snitch, you’ll regret it.”

3. Stool pigeon

This term refers to someone who provides information to authorities in exchange for leniency or other benefits. It is often used in criminal contexts.

  • For example, “The police relied on a stool pigeon to gather evidence against the gang.”
  • In a discussion about undercover operations, someone might say, “Stool pigeons play a crucial role in infiltrating criminal organizations.”
  • A character in a crime novel might comment, “You can never fully trust a stool pigeon.”

4. Fink

A fink is someone who provides information to authorities or others, often to gain an advantage or avoid trouble. It can also imply a sense of betrayal.

  • For instance, “He’s a fink who will sell you out for his own benefit.”
  • In a conversation about workplace politics, someone might say, “Watch out for the finks who will throw you under the bus.”
  • A character in a movie might warn, “Don’t trust him, he’s a fink.”

5. Canary

A canary is a slang term for someone who provides information to authorities or others, often in exchange for protection or leniency. It is often used in criminal contexts.

  • For example, “He’s a canary who sings to the police to avoid going to jail.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might say, “Canaries are often used to gather evidence against powerful criminals.”
  • A character in a crime novel might say, “Be careful, the canary might be wearing a wire.”

6. Tattletale

A tattletale is someone who reveals information about others, especially to authorities or people in power. It is often used to describe someone who reports the actions or wrongdoings of others, particularly in a negative or sneaky way.

  • For example, a child might say, “He’s such a tattletale, always telling on us.”
  • In a school setting, a student might complain, “The teacher’s pet is a tattletale, always running to the teacher with every little thing.”
  • A person discussing workplace dynamics might say, “Watch out for the office tattletale, they’ll report anything to the boss.”

7. Stoolie

A stoolie is a person who provides information to authorities or law enforcement, often in exchange for leniency or personal gain. It is often used to describe someone who betrays others, particularly in criminal or illicit activities.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need a stoolie to crack this case and get information from the inside.”
  • In a mob movie, a character might say, “We can’t trust him, he’s a known stoolie.”
  • A person discussing the criminal underworld might say, “Stoolies are despised by both criminals and law enforcement, as they betray both sides.”

8. Squealer

A squealer is someone who reveals information to authorities or others, often in a secretive or underhanded manner. It is often used to describe someone who informs on others, particularly in a negative or disloyal way.

  • For example, a person might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s a squealer. He’ll sell you out for his own benefit.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “The squealer spilled all the secrets, leading to the downfall of the criminal organization.”
  • A person discussing loyalty might say, “Squealers are seen as the lowest of the low, betraying their friends and associates for personal gain.”

9. Narc

A narc is a slang term for an undercover agent or informant, particularly in the context of narcotics or drug enforcement. It is often used to describe someone who infiltrates criminal organizations to gather information or make arrests.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We need to send in a narc to gather evidence on the drug ring.”
  • In a TV show about drug enforcement, a character might say, “The narc went undercover and gained the trust of the cartel.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of undercover work might say, “Narcs put themselves at great risk to gather information and take down criminals.”

10. Whistleblower

A whistleblower is someone who exposes or reports illegal or unethical activities within an organization or institution. It is often used to describe someone who reveals wrongdoing for the public good, often at personal risk.

  • For example, a person might say, “The whistleblower revealed the company’s fraudulent practices, leading to a major investigation.”
  • In a discussion about government transparency, a person might say, “Whistleblowers play a crucial role in holding those in power accountable.”
  • A person discussing the importance of speaking up might say, “Whistleblowers often face retaliation and need protection for their courage in exposing the truth.”

11. Stooly

A stooly is a slang term for an informant or someone who provides information to authorities or others. It is often used to refer to someone who betrays their friends or associates for personal gain or to avoid punishment.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “Watch out for that stooly, he can’t be trusted.”
  • In a discussion about criminal organizations, someone might comment, “Snitches and stoolies are despised in the underworld.”
  • A person accusing someone of being a stooly might say, “I heard you’ve been talking to the police, you little stooly!”

12. Tattler

A tattler is someone who tells on or reports the actions or wrongdoings of others, often to authorities or figures of authority. It is a term used to describe someone who informs on others, sometimes for personal gain or to avoid trouble themselves.

  • For instance, in a school setting, a student might say, “Don’t be a tattler and tell the teacher about our prank.”
  • In a conversation about workplace dynamics, someone might say, “Nobody likes a tattler who runs to the boss with every little issue.”
  • A person accusing someone of being a tattler might say, “You’re just a tattler trying to get us in trouble!”

13. Blabbermouth

A blabbermouth is someone who talks too much or shares information that should be kept private or confidential. It is often used to describe someone who cannot keep a secret or who reveals sensitive information without permission.

  • For example, in a group of friends, someone might say, “Don’t tell Sarah, she’s such a blabbermouth.”
  • In a discussion about workplace confidentiality, someone might comment, “We can’t trust that blabbermouth with sensitive information.”
  • A person accusing someone of being a blabbermouth might say, “You can’t keep your mouth shut, you blabbermouth!”

14. Informer

An informer is someone who provides information to authorities or others, often in exchange for something in return. It is a term used to describe someone who betrays their associates or reveals secrets or illegal activities to law enforcement or other interested parties.

  • For instance, in a crime drama, a detective might refer to a cooperating witness as an informer.
  • In a conversation about criminal investigations, someone might say, “Without informers, it would be difficult to gather evidence against organized crime.”
  • A person accusing someone of being an informer might say, “I heard you’ve been talking to the cops, you dirty informer!”

15. Ratfink

This term refers to a person who provides information or reports on others to authorities or figures of authority. It is often used to describe someone who betrays their friends or associates.

  • For example, in a gangster movie, one character might warn another, “Watch out for that ratfink, he’ll sell you out.”
  • In a discussion about undercover agents, someone might say, “A ratfink can be a valuable asset in gathering intelligence.”
  • A person might accuse someone of being a ratfink by saying, “Don’t trust him, he’s a known ratfink.”

16. Judas

This term originates from the biblical figure Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus Christ. It is used to describe someone who betrays or double-crosses others for personal gain or advantage.

  • For instance, if someone betrays a friend’s secret, they might be called a Judas.
  • In a political context, a person might accuse a politician of being a Judas for switching parties or betraying their constituents.
  • A person might describe a backstabbing colleague as a Judas by saying, “I can’t believe he would do that to us, what a Judas.”

17. Snout

This term is often used to refer to a police informant or undercover officer. It is derived from the slang term “snout” for a person’s nose, indicating that they are sniffing out information.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a detective might refer to an informant as a snout.
  • In a discussion about police tactics, someone might mention the use of snouts to gather information on criminal activities.
  • A person might accuse someone of being a snout by saying, “I saw him talking to the police, he’s definitely a snout.”

18. Squeaker

This term is used to describe someone who provides information or cooperates with authorities, often in exchange for leniency or personal gain. It is often used in criminal contexts.

  • For instance, in a prison movie, a character might call another inmate a squeaker for providing information to the guards.
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention the use of stool pigeons to gather evidence against criminal organizations.
  • A person might accuse someone of being a squeaker by saying, “I heard he’s been talking to the police, he’s nothing but a squeaker.”

19. Tattle-tale

This term is used to describe someone who reveals secrets or reports on others, often to get them in trouble or gain favor with authority figures. It is commonly used to refer to children who inform on their peers.

  • For example, in a school setting, a child might be called a tattle-tale for reporting their classmates’ misbehavior.
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, someone might mention the negative effects of tattle-tales on team morale.
  • A person might warn another about someone by saying, “Be careful around him, he’s a known snitch.”

20. Teller

A “teller” is a slang term for a person who provides information or reports someone’s actions to the authorities or other relevant parties. It is often used to describe someone who snitches on others.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s a teller.”
  • In a conversation about someone revealing secrets, one might comment, “She’s known to be a teller, so be careful what you say around her.”
  • Another example could be, “The teller provided crucial information that led to the arrest of the suspect.”

21. Tipster

A “tipster” is someone who provides information or tips to the authorities or others about a particular situation or person’s actions. It is often used to refer to someone who snitches or provides inside knowledge.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We received an anonymous tip from a tipster about the location of the stolen goods.”
  • In a discussion about crime-solving, someone might mention, “Tipsters play a crucial role in helping law enforcement solve cases.”
  • A news article might state, “A tipster provided valuable information that led to the arrest of a high-profile criminal.”

22. Weasel

A “weasel” is a derogatory term used to describe someone who betrays or reveals information about others, often for personal gain or to avoid trouble themselves. It implies a lack of loyalty or integrity.

  • For example, in a group of friends, someone might say, “I can’t believe he weaseled out and told the teacher about our plan.”
  • In a conversation about trust, one might warn, “Be careful who you share your secrets with, some people are weasels.”
  • Another example could be, “He weaseled his way out of trouble by snitching on his accomplices.”

23. Stool

A “stool” is a slang term for an informant or someone who provides information to the authorities, often in exchange for some benefit or to avoid punishment themselves. It is commonly used to refer to someone who snitches or betrays others.

  • For instance, in a crime drama, a character might say, “He’s a known stool, don’t trust him.”
  • In a discussion about police investigations, someone might mention, “Confidential informants or stools can be a valuable asset in solving cases.”
  • A news article might state, “The police relied on a stool to gather information about the criminal organization.”

24. Rat on

To “rat on” someone means to inform or betray them to the authorities or others, often in order to avoid trouble or gain an advantage for oneself. It is a slang phrase used to describe the act of snitching or revealing someone’s actions.

  • For example, in a school setting, a student might say, “I saw him ratting on his friends to the teacher.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, one might comment, “I would never rat on my friends, no matter what.”
  • Another example could be, “He ratted on his business partners to get a lighter sentence for himself.”

25. Blabber

Blabber is a slang term for someone who shares confidential or secret information with others, especially authorities or law enforcement. It can also refer to a person who talks excessively or indiscreetly about others.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s a blabber. He’ll sell us out to the cops.”
  • In a discussion about confidential information, someone might warn, “Be careful who you share your secrets with. You don’t want them to blabber.”
  • A person frustrated with a gossip might say, “I can’t stand that blabber. They can’t keep their mouth shut.”

26. Squeal

Squeal is a slang term for someone who betrays others by providing information, especially to the authorities or law enforcement. It can also refer to a person who confesses or reveals incriminating information.

  • For instance, in a gangster movie, a character might say, “Nobody likes a squeal. They’re the lowest of the low.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might comment, “I would never squeal on my friends. I value their trust.”
  • A person discussing criminal activities might warn, “If you squeal, you’ll put yourself in danger. It’s better to stay quiet.”

27. Betray

Betray is a slang term for someone who reveals or exposes confidential or incriminating information about others, especially to authorities or law enforcement. It can also refer to a person who breaks trust or loyalty.

  • For example, in a spy movie, a character might say, “He betrayed his country and sold out to the enemy.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “I can’t believe she betrayed me by spreading rumors.”
  • A person warning against disloyalty might say, “If you betray your gang, they’ll never trust you again.”

28. Sell out

Sell out is a slang term for someone who betrays or compromises their principles, beliefs, or loyalty for personal gain or advantage. It can also refer to a person who provides information or assistance to authorities or law enforcement.

  • For instance, in a political context, someone might say, “He used to fight for the people, but now he’s just a sell out.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, a person might comment, “I would never sell out my friends for money or fame.”
  • A person discussing whistleblowers might argue, “Some see them as sell outs, but others consider them heroes for exposing corruption.”

29. Grass

Grass is a slang term for someone who provides information or tips to authorities or law enforcement, often in exchange for leniency or personal gain. It can also refer to a person who betrays or exposes others.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He’s a known grass. Nobody trusts him.”
  • In a discussion about criminal activities, someone might comment, “If you don’t want to get caught, don’t associate with grasses.”
  • A person criticizing someone’s actions might say, “You’re nothing but a lowly grass, willing to sell out your own kind.”

30. Nark

A nark is a slang term for an informant or someone who provides information to the authorities. It is often used to describe someone who snitches on others or reports illegal activities.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “I can’t trust him, he’s a nark.”
  • In a discussion about undercover operations, someone might mention, “The police often rely on narks to gather information.”
  • A person might warn their friends, “Don’t share anything sensitive with him, he could be a nark.”

31. Snide

To snide is to betray someone’s trust by revealing their secrets or reporting their actions to the authorities. It is a term commonly used to refer to someone who acts as a snitch or informer.

  • For instance, in a gangster movie, a character might say, “I heard he snided on his own crew.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might state, “Real friends don’t snide on each other.”
  • A person might express their disappointment by saying, “I can’t believe he snided on us like that.”

32. Snitch on

To snitch on someone is to report their actions or reveal their secrets to the authorities or other people in a position of power. It is a term often used to describe someone who acts as an informant or snitch.

  • For example, in a school setting, a student might say, “He snitched on me for cheating.”
  • In a conversation about trust, someone might comment, “I would never snitch on my friends.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful what you say, you never know who might snitch on you.”
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