Top 39 Slang For Snorting Coke – Meaning & Usage

Snorting coke may be a taboo subject, but it’s important to be aware of the slang terms associated with this dangerous activity. Whether you’re trying to stay informed or just curious about the lingo, we’ve got you covered. Our team has done the research and put together a list of the top slang for snorting coke. Stay in the know and learn the language of this illicit world.

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1. Blow

Blow is a slang term for cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug. It is commonly used to refer to the powdered form of cocaine that is typically snorted.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always looking for a line of blow at parties.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might mention, “Blow is known for its euphoric effects.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I tried blow once and it gave me a burst of energy.”

2. Skiing

Skiing is a slang term used to describe the act of snorting cocaine. The term is derived from the physical motion of inhaling the drug through the nostrils, which can resemble the motion of skiing down a slope.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been skiing all night long.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever gone skiing?”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to enjoy skiing, but I’ve since quit.”

3. Lines

Lines refers to the small, straight lines of cocaine powder that are typically formed before snorting. The term is used to describe the physical appearance of the drug when it is divided into individual doses.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always chopping up lines.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might mention, “Lines are often associated with party scenes.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to measure out lines for myself and my friends.”

4. Rails

Rails is another term used to describe lines of cocaine that are prepared for snorting. The term is often used to emphasize the length or quantity of the lines.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He did a couple of fat rails.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever done rails?”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to snort rails regularly, but I’ve stopped now.”

5. White Horse

White Horse is a slang term for cocaine, specifically referring to the powdered form of the drug. The term is often used to emphasize the purity or quality of the cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always chasing the white horse.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might mention, “White Horse is known for its potent effects.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I’ve ridden the white horse a few times, but I’ve since quit.”

6. Snow

This term is a common nickname for cocaine, referring to its white, powdery appearance. It is often used in the context of snorting cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always got a bag of snow on him.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried snow?”
  • A person discussing the effects of cocaine might mention, “Snow can give you a burst of energy and euphoria.”

7. Powder

This term is used to refer to cocaine in its powdered form, which is typically snorted. It highlights the fine, powdery texture of the drug.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always snorting powder.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Powder is a common form of cocaine.”
  • A person talking about the dangers of cocaine might warn, “Snorting powder can lead to addiction and serious health problems.”

8. Coke

This is a widely recognized slang term for cocaine. It is commonly used to refer to the drug when discussing snorting it.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to coke.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried coke?”
  • A person discussing the negative effects of cocaine might mention, “Regular use of coke can lead to physical and mental health issues.”

9. Charlie

This term is a slang name for cocaine, often used in the context of snorting the drug. It may have originated from the first letter of the word “cocaine”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always looking for Charlie.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might mention, “Charlie can ruin lives.”
  • A person talking about the illegal drug trade might say, “Charlie is a highly sought-after substance in the underground market.”

10. Yayo

This term is a slang term for cocaine, primarily used in the context of snorting it. It is believed to have originated from the Spanish word “llello”, which means cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always snorting yayo.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried yayo?”
  • A person discussing the dangers of cocaine might mention, “Yayo can lead to addiction and devastating consequences.”

11. Nose Candy

This term is used to refer to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is typically snorted through the nose. The term “nose candy” is a playful and euphemistic way to refer to the drug.

  • For example, a person might say, “Do you have any nose candy?” when asking for cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might mention, “I’ve never tried nose candy before.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I need a little pick-me-up, got any nose candy?”

12. Bolivian Marching Powder

This slang term is a humorous and exaggerated way to refer to cocaine. It refers to the country of Bolivia, which is known for its production of coca leaves, the main ingredient in cocaine.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I heard he’s been using Bolivian marching powder.” to imply cocaine use.
  • In a discussion about drug culture, a person might mention, “Bolivian marching powder is a popular choice among partygoers.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as having a secret stash of Bolivian marching powder.
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13. Peruvian Flake

This slang term refers to cocaine that is said to come from Peru, a country known for its production of coca leaves. The term “flake” is a reference to the powdered form in which cocaine is typically found.

  • For example, someone might say, “I got some Peruvian flake, wanna try?” to offer cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug quality, a person might comment, “Peruvian flake is known for its purity.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I only snort the finest Peruvian flake.”

14. Toot

This term is used to refer to the act of snorting cocaine. It is derived from the sound made when inhaling the drug through the nose.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to take a toot” to indicate they are about to snort cocaine.
  • In a discussion about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried a toot?”
  • A character in a TV show might be depicted taking a toot of cocaine.

15. Sniff

This term is a straightforward and direct way to refer to the act of snorting cocaine. It is derived from the action of inhaling the drug through the nose.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to take a sniff” to indicate they are about to snort cocaine.
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “Sniffing cocaine can have serious health consequences.”
  • A character in a book might be described as having a habit of frequent sniffing.

16. Charlie Sheen

This term is a slang reference to the actor Charlie Sheen, who was known for his publicized drug use. It is used to refer to cocaine, particularly when snorted.

  • For example, someone might say, “I heard he’s been doing a lot of Charlie Sheen lately.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a person might mention, “Charlie Sheen’s struggles with cocaine are well-known.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful with that Charlie Sheen, it can ruin your life.”

17. Nose Clams

This term is a slang reference to cocaine, alluding to its white, powdery appearance and the act of snorting it through the nose.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I saw him snorting some nose clams at the party.”
  • In a discussion about drug slang, a person might ask, “Have you heard any other terms for cocaine, like nose clams?”
  • Another might jokingly say, “I prefer my seafood on a plate, not in my nose. No nose clams for me.”

18. Coca

This term is a shortened form of “cocaine.” It is often used in informal contexts or among drug users.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been using a lot of coca lately.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a person might mention, “Coca is a highly addictive substance.”
  • Another might warn, “Stay away from coca, it can have serious health consequences.”

19. White Lady

This term is a slang reference to cocaine, often used to describe the drug’s white, powdery form.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been spending a lot of time with the white lady.”
  • In a discussion about drug slang, a person might ask, “Have you heard any other terms for cocaine, like white lady?”
  • Another might comment, “The white lady has ruined many lives.”

20. Lady Snow

This term is a slang reference to cocaine, alluding to the drug’s white, powdery appearance and its association with a sense of purity or elegance.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been indulging in some lady snow.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a person might mention, “Lady snow can quickly become a dangerous addiction.”
  • Another might caution, “Don’t be fooled by the allure of lady snow, it can lead to serious consequences.”

21. Bumps

This term refers to small, thin lines of cocaine that are snorted through the nose. It is a common slang term used to describe the process of snorting cocaine.

  • For example, “He took a few bumps of coke before the party.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Do you prefer bumps or other methods of using cocaine?”
  • Another person might say, “I don’t like doing big lines, so I stick to small bumps.”

22. Sneeze

This term refers to the act of snorting cocaine, which can cause a sudden and intense sensation similar to the feeling of sneezing. It is often used as a slang term to describe the action of snorting cocaine.

  • For instance, “He sneezed a line of coke and felt the immediate rush.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever sneezed coke? It’s intense.”
  • Another person might say, “I prefer sneezing coke over other methods because it hits me faster.”

23. Hoover

This term refers to the act of inhaling cocaine through the nose, similar to the action of a vacuum cleaner sucking up dirt. It is a slang term often used to describe the process of snorting cocaine.

  • For example, “He hoovered up a line of coke and felt the effects.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Do you prefer hoovering or other methods of using cocaine?”
  • Another person might say, “I find hoovering cocaine to be more discreet than other methods.”

24. Tony

This term is a slang word for cocaine. It is derived from the name “Tony Montana,” the main character in the movie “Scarface,” who is known for his excessive cocaine use.

  • For instance, “He’s always carrying around a little baggie of Tony.”
  • In a discussion about drug culture, someone might say, “Tony is a popular choice among partygoers.”
  • Another person might ask, “Where can I find some Tony?”

25. Lady

This term is a slang word for cocaine, often used to refer to the drug in a more discreet or euphemistic manner. It is commonly used among drug users and those familiar with drug culture.

  • For example, “He’s been spending a lot of time with Lady lately.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried Lady?”
  • Another person might say, “I’m not a fan of Lady, but to each their own.”

26. Pearl

Pearl is a slang term used to refer to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is typically snorted. The term “pearl” may be used to discreetly discuss or ask for cocaine in social settings.

  • For example, someone might say, “Do you know where I can find some pearl?”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “I’ve tried a few different drugs, but I’ve never touched pearl.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful with pearl, it can be highly addictive and have serious health consequences.”

27. Nose beers

Nose beers is a slang term used to refer to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is commonly snorted through the nose. The term “nose beers” is a playful and lighthearted way to refer to cocaine in social situations.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Anyone up for some nose beers tonight?”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might casually mention, “I’ve dabbled in nose beers a few times.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know where I can get some quality nose beers?”

28. Bumps and lines

Bumps and lines are slang terms used to describe the method of consuming cocaine by snorting it. “Bumps” refers to small amounts of cocaine that are snorted in quick succession, while “lines” refers to longer, thin lines of cocaine that are snorted in one go.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s do some bumps and lines tonight.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “I prefer doing bumps rather than lines.”
  • Another might ask, “How do you usually measure out your bumps and lines?”

29. Powdered sugar

Powdered sugar is a slang term used to refer to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is typically sold as a fine, white powder. The term “powdered sugar” is a euphemism often used to discreetly discuss or ask for cocaine in social settings.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Do you have any powdered sugar?”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “I’ve heard that powdered sugar can be quite addictive.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful with powdered sugar, it can have serious legal and health consequences.”

30. Marching powder

Marching powder is a slang term used to refer to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is commonly snorted. The term “marching powder” is a metaphorical term that suggests the energetic and stimulating effects of cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need a little marching powder to get through the night.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “I’ve tried marching powder a few times, but it’s not really my thing.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know where I can find some quality marching powder?”

31. Colombian marching powder

This term refers to cocaine that is sourced from Colombia, a country known for its production and export of the drug. The term “marching powder” is a colloquialism for cocaine.

  • For example, in a conversation about drug trafficking, someone might say, “Colombian marching powder is highly sought after in the global drug trade.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of cocaine, someone might mention, “Colombian marching powder is known for its high purity.”
  • A person discussing the effects of cocaine might say, “Be careful with Colombian marching powder, as it can be highly addictive.”

32. Devil’s dandruff

This term is a slang term for cocaine. The term “devil’s dandruff” is used to describe the powdery appearance of the drug.

  • For instance, in a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “He’s addicted to devil’s dandruff.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of cocaine, someone might warn, “Be careful with devil’s dandruff, as it can have serious health consequences.”
  • A person discussing the prevalence of cocaine use might mention, “Devil’s dandruff is a commonly abused drug in certain social circles.”

33. Sniffing the white horse

This phrase refers to the act of snorting cocaine. The term “white horse” is a metaphor for cocaine, with the act of sniffing representing drug use.

  • For example, in a conversation about drug habits, someone might ask, “Have you seen him sniffing the white horse again?”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of cocaine addiction, someone might say, “Sniffing the white horse can lead to serious health problems.”
  • A person discussing the prevalence of cocaine use might mention, “Sniffing the white horse is a common practice at parties and clubs.”

34. White

This term is a slang term for cocaine. The word “white” refers to the color and appearance of the drug, which is typically a white powder.

  • For instance, in a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “He’s addicted to white.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of cocaine, someone might warn, “Be careful with white, as it can have serious health consequences.”
  • A person discussing the prevalence of cocaine use might mention, “White is a commonly abused drug in certain social circles.”

35. Peruvian marching powder

This term refers to cocaine that is sourced from Peru, a country known for its production and export of the drug. The term “marching powder” is a colloquialism for cocaine.

  • For example, in a conversation about drug trafficking, someone might say, “Peruvian marching powder is highly sought after in the global drug trade.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of cocaine, someone might mention, “Peruvian marching powder is known for its high purity.”
  • A person discussing the effects of cocaine might say, “Be careful with Peruvian marching powder, as it can be highly addictive.”

36. Rail

A “rail” refers to a line of cocaine that is prepared for snorting. It is typically a thin, straight line of the drug.

  • For example, “He snorted a rail of cocaine off the table.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might ask, “Have you ever done a rail before?”
  • A person describing a party might say, “There were lines of coke on the coffee table, ready to be snorted.”

37. Ski slopes

The term “ski slopes” is a slang term for cocaine, comparing the white powder to the smooth, snowy slopes of a ski resort.

  • For instance, “He’s always hitting the ski slopes on the weekends.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “I’ve never tried skiing, but I’ve heard the slopes are fun.”
  • A person discussing recreational drug use might mention, “Cocaine is often referred to as ski slopes in certain circles.”

38. Candy cane

In some contexts, “candy cane” refers to a mixture of cocaine and heroin that is often injected together.

  • For example, “He was addicted to candy cane, a dangerous mix of drugs.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “Candy cane is a highly potent and deadly combination.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of drug use might warn, “Mixing cocaine and heroin, also known as candy cane, is extremely risky.”

39. Caviar

The term “caviar” is a slang term for cocaine, likening the small white crystals of the drug to the expensive delicacy made from fish eggs.

  • For instance, “He’s always indulging in caviar at parties.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “I’ve heard caviar is a popular choice among certain social circles.”
  • A person discussing the effects of cocaine might mention, “Caviar can produce intense euphoria and increased energy levels.”