Top 40 Slang For Steal – Meaning & Usage

In a world full of ever-evolving language, it’s important to stay in the loop with the latest slang words and phrases. Today, we’re diving into the world of slang for steal. From common phrases to unique expressions, we’ve got you covered with a comprehensive list that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to discover the coolest and most current slang for steal that will make you the envy of your friends.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Blag

This term is commonly used in British slang to refer to stealing or taking something without permission, often through deception or trickery.

  • For example, “He managed to blag his way into the concert without a ticket.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might say, “I heard she blagged a new pair of shoes from that store.”
  • A person discussing a clever theft might comment, “That was a smooth blag, nobody saw it coming.”

2. Bleed Dry

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone steals or takes everything of value from a person or a place, leaving nothing behind.

  • For instance, “The burglars bled the house dry, taking all the jewelry and electronics.”
  • In a discussion about a con artist, someone might say, “He’s known for bleeding his victims dry, leaving them with nothing.”
  • A person discussing financial fraud might comment, “These scammers are experts at bleeding people dry and disappearing with their life savings.”

3. Bogart

This term originated from the actor Humphrey Bogart, who was known for holding onto a cigarette for an extended period without sharing. It has since been used to describe someone who selfishly keeps or monopolizes something that should be shared.

  • For example, “Don’t bogart the joint, pass it around.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “He always bogarts the last slice of pizza.”
  • A person discussing a group project might comment, “We need to work together and not let anyone bogart all the credit.”

4. Boost

This term is commonly used to refer to stealing or shoplifting something, often from a store or a person.

  • For instance, “He managed to boost a new phone from the electronics store.”
  • In a discussion about theft, someone might say, “There has been an increase in shoplifters boosting items from local businesses.”
  • A person discussing a stolen car might comment, “The thieves boosted the vehicle and took off.”

5. Borrowing Without Permission

This phrase is a straightforward way of describing the act of taking or using something without asking for permission, essentially stealing it.

  • For example, “He’s always borrowing without permission and never returns what he takes.”
  • In a conversation about personal belongings, someone might say, “I caught her borrowing without permission from my purse.”
  • A person discussing trust issues might comment, “I can’t stand people who think borrowing without permission is acceptable.”

6. Carp

To carp means to snatch or take something quickly and stealthily. It is often used in the context of stealing something without being noticed.

  • For example, “He carped my phone right out of my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about pickpocketing, someone might say, “Watch out for people trying to carp your wallet.”
  • A thief might boast, “I can carp anything without anyone noticing.”

7. Chav

To chav means to swipe or pinch something, usually without permission. It is commonly used in British slang.

  • For instance, “He chaved my bag when I wasn’t looking.”
  • In a discussion about shoplifting, someone might say, “They chavved a bunch of clothes from that store.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you chav any snacks from the kitchen?”

8. Clean Out

To clean out means to empty or loot a place or container, taking everything of value.

  • For example, “They cleaned out the entire store and left no merchandise behind.”
  • In a conversation about burglary, someone might say, “They cleaned out my house while I was on vacation.”
  • A person discussing a robbery might comment, “The thieves cleaned out the bank vault and left no trace.”

9. Cozen

To cozen means to trick or deceive someone in order to gain something, often through dishonest means.

  • For instance, “He cozened me into buying a fake watch.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Be careful not to get cozened by online fraudsters.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s known to cozen people out of their money.”

10. Debo

To debo means to take something forcefully or aggressively, often without permission or consent.

  • For example, “He debod my headphones and ran away.”
  • In a conversation about confrontations, someone might say, “I deboed his phone because he owed me money.”
  • A person discussing theft might comment, “They debod the jewelry from the display case and escaped unnoticed.”

11. Gaffle

Gaffle is a slang term that means to steal or take something without permission. It is often used to describe the act of taking something quickly or discreetly.

  • For example, “He gaffled a candy bar from the store.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe he gaffled my phone when I wasn’t looking.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, a person might mention, “She’s been known to gaffle small items from stores.”

12. Gank

Gank is a slang term that means to steal or take something forcefully. It is often used to describe the act of taking something aggressively or without regard for others.

  • For instance, “He ganked my wallet right out of my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she ganked my idea and claimed it as her own.”
  • In a discussion about online gaming, someone might mention, “Players who gank others in PvP are often seen as bullies.”

13. Five-Finger Discount

Five-Finger Discount is a slang term that refers to the act of stealing something without paying for it. It is often used humorously to describe shoplifting or theft in general.

  • For example, “He got caught trying to get a five-finger discount on that shirt.”
  • Someone might say, “I used to give myself a five-finger discount on candy when I was a kid.”
  • In a conversation about stealing, a person might mention, “She’s got a knack for getting a five-finger discount on expensive items.”

14. Half-Inch

Half-Inch is a slang term that means to steal or take something without permission. It is often used in British English to describe the act of taking something without paying for it.

  • For instance, “He half-inched a bottle of wine from the shop.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she half-inched my pen and claimed it as her own.”
  • In a discussion about shoplifting, someone might mention, “Watch out for that guy, he’s known to half-inch small items.”

15. Highway Robbery

Highway Robbery is a slang term that means to overcharge or excessively charge for something. It is often used to describe a situation where someone feels they are being taken advantage of or ripped off.

  • For example, “The price they’re asking for that car is highway robbery.”
  • Someone might say, “Paying $10 for a cup of coffee is like highway robbery.”
  • In a conversation about expensive concert tickets, a person might mention, “The prices they’re charging these days are highway robbery.”

16. Horch

This slang term is derived from the German word “horchen,” which means “to listen.” It refers to eavesdropping or listening in on a conversation or private information without permission.

  • For example, “I horched on their conversation and found out their secret.”
  • In a sneaky situation, someone might say, “Let’s horch on their plans and see what they’re up to.”
  • A person discussing gossip might say, “I love to horch on the latest celebrity news.”

17. Knocked Off

This phrase is used to describe the act of stealing or taking something without permission.

  • For instance, “Someone knocked off my bicycle last night.”
  • In a crime report, a victim might say, “They knocked off my wallet while I wasn’t looking.”
  • A person discussing theft might say, “I can’t believe someone knocked off my car right in front of my house.”

18. Lift

To “lift” something means to take or steal it without permission.

  • For example, “She lifted some money from her friend’s purse.”
  • In a shoplifting scenario, someone might say, “He tried to lift a shirt from the store.”
  • A person discussing stealing might say, “I can’t believe he lifted my phone right out of my pocket.”

19. Loot

This term refers to stolen goods or items that have been acquired through illegal means.

  • For instance, “The thieves made off with a bag full of loot.”
  • In a heist movie, a character might say, “We need to split the loot evenly among ourselves.”
  • A person discussing stolen items might say, “The police recovered some of the loot from the burglaries.”

20. Misappropriate

To “misappropriate” means to take or use something without permission or in an improper manner.

  • For example, “He misappropriated company funds for personal expenses.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The accused is alleged to have misappropriated trade secrets.”
  • A person discussing embezzlement might say, “He was charged with misappropriating funds from the organization.”

21. Mugger

This term refers to a person who commits robbery or theft, often through the use of force or intimidation. It is commonly used to describe someone who steals from individuals in public places.

  • For example, “She was attacked by a mugger on her way home from work.”
  • In a news report, you might read, “The police are searching for the mugger who targeted several victims in the park.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was mugged last night and lost my wallet and phone.”

22. Nick

To “nick” something means to steal or take it without permission. It is a slang term commonly used in informal settings.

  • For instance, “Someone nicked my bike while I was at the store.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, one might say, “She got caught trying to nick a candy bar.”
  • A person sharing a funny story might say, “My friend tried to nick some fries from a stranger’s plate, but got caught in the act.”

23. Palm

To “palm” something means to steal or take it secretly, usually by hiding it in the palm of one’s hand. It is often used to describe stealing small objects.

  • For example, “He palmed a few coins from the cashier’s tray.”
  • In a discussion about pickpocketing, one might say, “The thief skillfully palmed the victim’s wallet.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I saw someone palm a lipstick from the makeup counter.”

24. Pinch

To “pinch” something means to steal or take it without permission. It is a common slang term used to describe stealing in informal contexts.

  • For instance, “She pinched her sister’s earrings without asking.”
  • In a conversation about theft, one might say, “The thief managed to pinch a valuable painting from the museum.”
  • A person sharing a funny story might say, “My dog pinched a slice of pizza off the table when I wasn’t looking.”

25. Pocket

To “pocket” something means to steal or take it without permission, often by hiding it in one’s pocket. This term is commonly used to describe stealing small objects.

  • For example, “He pocketed a pen from the office.”
  • In a discussion about shoplifting, one might say, “She managed to pocket a lipstick without getting caught.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I saw someone pocket a keychain from a souvenir shop.”

26. Snitch

A “snitch” is someone who provides information or reports on someone else’s wrongdoing to authorities or other people in power. The term is often used to describe someone who betrays a group or individual by sharing confidential information.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s a snitch.”
  • In a discussion about police informants, someone might mention, “Snitches play a crucial role in helping solve crimes.”
  • A person accusing someone of betrayal might say, “I can’t believe you snitched on me, I trusted you!”

27. Swipe

To “swipe” something means to steal it quickly or discreetly, usually by taking it without someone noticing. The term is often associated with stealing small objects or items that can easily be taken without attracting attention.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I swiped a pen from the office, I needed one for home.”
  • In a story about shoplifting, a character might say, “She swiped a necklace from the jewelry store.”
  • Someone might admit, “I swiped some candy from the store when no one was looking.”

28. Take Off

To “take off” something means to borrow or take without permission. It implies that the action is done quickly or without the owner’s knowledge. The term is often used to describe taking something temporarily, with the intention of returning it later.

  • For example, a sibling might say, “I took off your shirt, I’ll give it back tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about borrowing books, someone might say, “I took off a novel from my friend’s shelf.”
  • A person admitting to borrowing without permission might say, “I took off some money from my roommate’s wallet, but I’ll pay them back.”

29. Trouser

To “trouser” something means to steal or take something, usually by hiding it in one’s pants or pockets. The term is often used to describe stealing small items or valuables by concealing them in clothing.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “He trousered some money from the cash register.”
  • In a story about pickpocketing, a character might say, “She trousered a wallet without anyone noticing.”
  • Someone might confess, “I trousered a few pens from the office supply room for personal use.”

30. Twoc

To “twoc” something means to take or steal it without the owner’s consent, typically referring to stealing a vehicle. The term is often used in the context of car theft or unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Teenagers arrested for twoc-ing luxury cars.”
  • In a conversation about stolen bikes, someone might say, “My bike got twoc-ed from outside my house.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Be careful where you park your car, it might get twoc-ed.”

31. Whiz

To take something without permission or unlawfully. “Whiz” is a slang term for steal, often used to describe a quick and sneaky theft.

  • For example, “I whizzed a candy bar from the store.”
  • A person might say, “Did you see that guy whiz that woman’s purse?”
  • In a conversation about theft, someone might ask, “Have you ever whizzed anything before?”

32. Whiz Mob

A group of individuals who work together to carry out coordinated thefts. “Whiz mob” refers to a gang or crew of skilled thieves.

  • For instance, “The whiz mob successfully pulled off a heist at the museum.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might say, “The whiz mob is known for their sophisticated theft operations.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you heard of any recent activities by the whiz mob?”

33. Jack

To take something without permission or unlawfully. “Jack” is a common slang term for steal, often used to describe a theft that involves force or aggression.

  • For example, “He jacked my phone when I wasn’t looking.”
  • A person might say, “Watch out for that guy, he’s known to jack cars.”
  • In a conversation about stolen goods, someone might ask, “Have you ever been jacked before?”

34. Snatch

To quickly and stealthily take something without permission. “Snatch” is a slang term for steal, often used to describe a swift and discreet theft.

  • For instance, “He snatched my wallet right out of my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to be careful, there are pickpockets who snatch valuables in this area.”
  • In a discussion about stolen items, someone might ask, “What’s the most valuable thing you’ve ever snatched?”

35. Filch

To steal something in a sly or sneaky manner. “Filch” is a slang term for steal, often used to describe a theft that involves cunning or trickery.

  • For example, “He filched some money from his friend’s wallet.”
  • A person might say, “The magician filched the spectator’s watch during the trick.”
  • In a conversation about thieves, someone might ask, “Have you ever filched anything before?”

36. Purloin

To take something without permission or unlawfully. “Purloin” is a more formal and old-fashioned term for stealing.

  • For example, a detective might say, “The thief managed to purloin the valuable artifact from the museum.”
  • In a historical novel, a character might confess, “I couldn’t resist the temptation to purloin a few coins from my employer.”
  • A teacher might scold a student, “You should never purloin someone else’s lunch from the cafeteria.”

37. Crib

To steal or borrow without permission. “Crib” can also refer to a dwelling or place of residence.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’m just going to crib a pen from you.”
  • In a movie about high school pranks, a character might say, “Let’s crib the answers to the test from the teacher’s desk.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you crib that toy from your sibling without asking?”

38. Plunder

To steal or take goods by force, especially during a war or conflict. “Plunder” is often used to describe stealing on a large scale.

  • For example, a historian might say, “The invading army plundered the city, taking anything of value they could find.”
  • In a video game set in a post-apocalyptic world, a character might say, “We need to find supplies and plunder abandoned buildings.”
  • A pirate captain might command their crew, “Plunder that ship and bring back the treasure!”

39. Grift

To deceive or cheat someone, often in order to steal their money or possessions. “Grift” is commonly used in the context of scams or confidence tricks.

  • For instance, a victim might say, “I can’t believe I fell for their grift and lost all my savings.”
  • In a movie about con artists, a character might explain, “Our plan is to grift unsuspecting tourists out of their money.”
  • A detective might warn a potential victim, “Be careful of anyone trying to grift you with a too-good-to-be-true investment opportunity.”

40. Snag

To steal or take something quickly or unexpectedly. “Snag” is often used to describe a swift or opportunistic theft.

  • For example, a witness might say, “I saw someone snagging a purse from the unsuspecting tourist.”
  • In a story about a pickpocket, a character might say, “He managed to snag the wallet without the victim even realizing.”
  • A security guard might report, “We caught a shoplifter red-handed as they tried to snag a few items from the store.”
See also  Top 33 Slang For Worse – Meaning & Usage