Top 58 Slang For Stealing – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang for stealing, there’s a whole underground language that’s evolved over the years. From pickpocketing to shoplifting, there are countless terms used to describe the act of taking something that doesn’t belong to you. We’ve done the research and rounded up the top slang words and phrases for stealing. So whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or just curious about the secret language of thieves, this listicle is for you. Get ready to dive into the world of sticky fingers and learn some sneaky slang!

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1. Blag

The term “blag” is often used to describe stealing or obtaining something dishonestly. It can refer to various forms of theft, such as shoplifting or scamming.

  • For example, “He managed to blag his way into the concert without a ticket.”
  • In a discussion about theft, someone might say, “I can’t believe she blagged that expensive handbag.”
  • Another person might warn, “Watch out for pickpockets who try to blag your wallet.”

2. Bleed Dry

When someone “bleeds dry” another person, they are stealing or taking advantage of them to the point of exhausting all their money or resources.

  • For instance, “He was slowly bleeding his elderly relative dry by constantly asking for money.”
  • In a conversation about financial scams, someone might say, “These fraudsters are experts at bleeding their victims dry.”
  • A person discussing a manipulative relationship might say, “She was slowly bleeding me dry with her constant demands.”

3. Bogart

The term “bogart” is often used to describe someone selfishly keeping something that should be shared, especially in a group setting.

  • For example, “He bogarted all the snacks and didn’t offer any to the rest of us.”
  • In a discussion about fair distribution, someone might say, “Don’t bogart the resources, share them with everyone.”
  • Another person might complain, “He always bogarts the best parking spot and leaves the rest of us with the worst ones.”

4. Boost

The term “boost” is slang for stealing or shoplifting, typically referring to taking items from a store without paying for them.

  • For instance, “He managed to boost a new pair of shoes without getting caught.”
  • In a conversation about theft, someone might say, “Shoplifters often use distraction techniques to boost items.”
  • A person discussing prevention strategies might say, “Store owners should implement security measures to deter boosting.”

5. Borrowing Without Permission

The phrase “borrowing without permission” is often used sarcastically to describe someone taking something without asking or stealing it.

  • For example, “He’s always borrowing without permission, but he never returns anything.”
  • In a discussion about trust, someone might say, “Taking someone’s belongings without permission is just another form of stealing.”
  • Another person might warn, “Be careful with your valuables around people who have a habit of borrowing without permission.”

6. Carp

To steal merchandise from a store, typically by concealing it in one’s clothing or bag. “Carp” is a slang term often used to refer to the act of shoplifting.

  • For example, “He got caught carping some snacks from the convenience store.”
  • A teenager might brag, “I’m so good at carping, I’ve never been caught.”
  • In a discussion about theft prevention, someone might say, “Stores need to implement better security measures to combat carping.”

7. Chav

To take something without permission or unlawfully. “Chav” is a slang term often used to refer to a person who engages in theft or other criminal activities.

  • For instance, “He chaved that guy’s wallet when he wasn’t looking.”
  • A news headline might read, “Chav gang arrested for a string of burglaries.”
  • In a conversation about personal experiences, someone might say, “I had my phone chaved while I was on the subway.”

8. Clean Out

To thoroughly steal or take everything from a place or person. “Clean out” is a slang term often used to describe the act of completely depleting someone or something of value.

  • For example, “They cleaned out the jewelry store, taking everything in sight.”
  • A person might say, “I cleaned out my brother’s fridge while he was on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about being scammed, someone might warn, “Be careful, they’ll clean you out if you’re not careful.”

9. Cozen

To deceive or trick someone in order to obtain their money or possessions. “Cozen” is a slang term often used to describe the act of swindling or defrauding.

  • For instance, “He cozened his way into her bank account and stole all her savings.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t trust him, he’s known for cozening people out of their valuables.”
  • In a conversation about fraud prevention, someone might say, “It’s important to educate yourself on common cozening tactics.”

10. Debo

To forcefully take someone’s belongings or money. “Debo” is a slang term often used to describe the act of robbing or stealing through intimidation or aggression.

  • For example, “He debod that guy’s wallet at knifepoint.”
  • A news headline might read, “Local store owner deboed by armed assailant.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might say, “Always be aware of your surroundings to avoid getting debod.”

11. Gaffle

To steal or take something without permission or right. “Gaffle” is a slang term used to describe the act of stealing.

  • For example, “He gaffled my phone while I wasn’t looking.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to gaffle some snacks from the kitchen.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might mention, “She got caught gaffling clothes from the store.”

12. Gank

To steal or take something, typically in a sneaky or underhanded manner. “Gank” is a slang term commonly used to refer to stealing.

  • For instance, “He ganked my wallet from my bag.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to gank some cash from my roommate’s wallet.”
  • In a discussion about video games, someone might mention, “I ganked his character’s loot in the game.”

13. Five-Finger Discount

To steal something from a store without paying for it. “Five-Finger Discount” is a slang term often used to refer to shoplifting.

  • For example, “He got caught trying to get a five-finger discount on that shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve never paid for a candy bar thanks to the five-finger discount.”
  • In a conversation about stealing, someone might mention, “She’s known for her five-finger discount skills.”

14. Half-Inch

To steal or take something without permission. “Half-Inch” is a British slang term used to describe stealing.

  • For instance, “He half-inched my wallet when I wasn’t looking.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to half-inch that book from the library.”
  • In a discussion about stolen goods, someone might mention, “I bought this TV off someone who half-inched it.”

15. Highway Robbery

To charge an excessively high price for something. “Highway robbery” is a phrase used to describe a situation where someone is being charged an unfair or exorbitant amount of money.

  • For example, “They’re charging $20 for a small cup of coffee? That’s highway robbery!”
  • A person might say, “The price they’re asking for this concert ticket is highway robbery.”
  • In a conversation about expensive products, someone might mention, “The cost of designer handbags is often considered highway robbery.”

16. Horch

This slang term is derived from the German word “horchen,” which means “to listen.” It refers to eavesdropping or listening in on someone’s conversation or private information without their knowledge or consent.

  • For example, “I horched in on their conversation and found out their secret.”
  • A person discussing gossip might say, “I love to horch on the latest celebrity rumors.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might be tasked with “horching” on an enemy’s plans.
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17. Knocked Off

This slang term is used to describe an item that has been stolen or taken without permission.

  • For instance, “Someone knocked off my bike from the front yard.”
  • A person might say, “I had my wallet knocked off while traveling in a crowded subway.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might investigate a series of “knocked off” jewelry store heists.

18. Lift

This slang term refers to the act of stealing or taking something without permission. It implies a quick and discreet action.

  • For example, “She lifted a candy bar from the store without anyone noticing.”
  • A person might say, “I saw him lift a wallet from someone’s bag.”
  • In a movie about pickpockets, a character might demonstrate their skills by lifting a watch from a stranger’s wrist.

19. Loot

This slang term refers to stolen goods or valuable items obtained through theft.

  • For instance, “The thieves made off with a lot of loot from the bank robbery.”
  • A person might say, “He’s always on the lookout for easy loot.”
  • In a video game, players might go on a quest to collect loot from defeated enemies.

20. Misappropriate

This slang term is used to describe the act of stealing or using something, typically money or funds, for one’s own benefit without permission or inappropriately.

  • For example, “He misappropriated company funds for personal expenses.”
  • A person might say, “It’s important to report any misappropriation of funds in an organization.”
  • In a news article about a corruption scandal, the headline might read, “Politician accused of misappropriating public funds.”

21. Mugger

A mugger is a person who steals from someone, typically by using force or threats. The term is often used to describe someone who commits street robberies.

  • For example, “I was walking home when a mugger came up to me and demanded my wallet.”
  • In a news article about a recent crime spree, the headline might read, “Police on the lookout for mugger targeting pedestrians.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I was mugged last night. It was a terrifying experience.”

22. Nick

To nick something means to steal it, usually in a casual or sneaky manner. The term is commonly used in British slang.

  • For instance, “I nicked a candy bar from the store without anyone noticing.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might say, “I heard she got caught nicking some clothes from a department store.”
  • A person admitting to their past actions might say, “I used to nick small items from my classmates’ backpacks in school.”

23. Palm

To palm something means to steal it by concealing it in the palm of your hand. The term is often used to describe a quick and discreet act of theft.

  • For example, “The pickpocket skillfully palmed the victim’s wallet without them noticing.”
  • In a discussion about magic tricks, someone might explain, “The magician palmed the coin and made it disappear.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I once saw a street performer palm a person’s watch and return it without them realizing.”

24. Pinch

To pinch something means to steal it, usually in a sly or sneaky manner. The term is commonly used in informal contexts.

  • For instance, “She pinched a few dollars from her sister’s purse when she wasn’t looking.”
  • In a conversation about petty theft, someone might say, “I can’t believe he pinched my phone right out of my pocket.”
  • A person confessing to their actions might say, “I pinched a pack of gum from the convenience store because I didn’t have any cash.”

25. Pocket

To pocket something means to steal it, usually by discreetly placing it in one’s pocket. The term is often used to describe theft that goes unnoticed.

  • For example, “He pocketed the valuable necklace while no one was looking.”
  • In a discussion about pickpocketing techniques, someone might say, “The thief deftly pocketed the victim’s wallet without them feeling a thing.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I once witnessed someone pocketing items from a store and reported it to the staff.”

26. Prig

A prig refers to a person who steals or takes something without permission. It is a slang term for a thief.

  • For example, “The prig stole my wallet while I was distracted.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might say, “Watch out for prigs in crowded stores.”
  • A person discussing a stolen item might ask, “Did you see who the prig was?”

27. Punk

Punk is a slang term for a person who steals or commits robberies. It is often used to describe someone who engages in criminal activities.

  • For instance, “The punk broke into my car and stole my valuables.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might say, “Punks like him give our neighborhood a bad reputation.”
  • A person warning others about a thief might say, “Be careful, there are punks lurking around this area.”

28. Rip Off

To rip off means to steal or take something dishonestly or unfairly. It is a slang term for theft.

  • For example, “That store ripped me off by charging double the price for the same item.”
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “Don’t fall for their tricks, they’re just trying to rip you off.”
  • A person discussing a stolen idea might say, “He totally ripped off my design without giving me credit.”

29. Smash And Grab

Smash and grab refers to a type of quick theft where the thief smashes a window or door to quickly grab items and escape. It is often used to describe thefts from vehicles or stores.

  • For instance, “The thief did a smash and grab on my car, taking my bag and laptop.”
  • In a discussion about security measures, someone might say, “Installing security cameras can help deter smash and grab thefts.”
  • A person warning others about a recent incident might say, “Be careful when parking in this area, there have been a lot of smash and grabs.”

30. Snake

Snake is a slang term for a sly or cunning thief. It is often used to describe someone who steals in a sneaky or deceptive manner.

  • For example, “He’s such a snake, always finding ways to steal without getting caught.”
  • In a conversation about thefts in the workplace, someone might say, “Watch out for snakes who steal office supplies.”
  • A person discussing a stolen item might say, “I have a feeling it was a snake who took it, they’re always lurking around.”

31. Snitch

A snitch is someone who provides information to the authorities or other individuals, often in exchange for leniency or personal gain. The term is commonly used in the context of criminal activities.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s a snitch.”
  • In a discussion about undercover operations, someone might mention, “The success of the operation relied on the information provided by a snitch.”
  • A person warning others about potential informants might say, “Be careful who you talk to, you never know who might be a snitch.”

32. Swipe

To “swipe” means to steal something quickly and discreetly. The term is often used in informal contexts to describe the act of taking something without permission or unlawfully.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I swiped some candy from the store.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might mention, “She managed to swipe a few items without getting caught.”
  • A person describing a theft incident might say, “Someone swiped my phone while I wasn’t looking.”

33. Take Off

To “take off” is a euphemistic slang term for stealing, specifically referring to the act of taking something without the owner’s permission or knowledge.

  • For example, a teenager might say, “I took off my sister’s shirt without asking.”
  • In a discussion about petty theft, someone might mention, “He’s known to take off small items from stores.”
  • A person confessing to a minor theft might say, “I couldn’t resist, so I took off a candy bar from the counter.”

34. Trouser

To “trouser” something means to steal it and hide it in one’s pocket or clothing. The term is commonly used in British English and is a colloquialism for the act of stealing.

  • For instance, a character in a novel might say, “He trousered the diamond necklace and walked away.”
  • In a conversation about pickpocketing, someone might mention, “They’re experts at trousering wallets without anyone noticing.”
  • A person warning others about a skilled thief might say, “Watch out for him, he can trouser your belongings in seconds.”

35. Twoc

TWOC is an acronym for “Take Without Owner’s Consent,” which is a legal term used in the United Kingdom to describe the act of stealing a vehicle without permission. It is primarily used in the context of car theft.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Teenagers arrested for TWOCing luxury cars.”
  • In a conversation about vehicle theft, someone might mention, “TWOCing has become a major issue in urban areas.”
  • A person describing their car being stolen might say, “My car was TWOCed from right outside my house.”

36. Whiz

This term refers to a person who steals or engages in stealing activities. “Whiz” is often used to describe someone who is skilled or clever at stealing.

  • For example, “Watch out for that whiz, he’s known for pickpocketing.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might be described as a “whiz at cracking safes.”
  • A person discussing a recent theft might say, “I can’t believe the whiz got away with stealing my wallet.”

37. Whiz Mob

This term refers to a group of thieves or a gang that engages in organized stealing activities. “Whiz mob” is often used to describe a group that is skilled and coordinated in their stealing operations.

  • For instance, “The police are on the lookout for a whiz mob that has been targeting high-end stores.”
  • In a movie about heists, the main characters might form a “whiz mob” to pull off a big robbery.
  • A news article about a series of burglaries might mention, “The whiz mob has struck again, leaving authorities puzzled.”

38. Jack

This term is a verb that means to take something without permission or right. “Jack” can be used to describe various forms of stealing, from petty theft to more serious crimes.

  • For example, “Someone jacked my bike while I was at the store.”
  • A person discussing a shoplifting incident might say, “I saw her jack a pack of gum from the convenience store.”
  • In a movie about bank robbers, a character might say, “Let’s jack the vault and make off with the cash.”

39. Snatch

This term is a verb that means to quickly and discreetly take something without permission or right. “Snatch” is often used to describe stealing something in a swift and sneaky manner.

  • For instance, “He snatched her purse and disappeared into the crowd.”
  • In a conversation about a stolen phone, someone might say, “I had my phone on the table and someone snatched it when I wasn’t looking.”
  • A news report about a pickpocket might mention, “The thief snatched wallets from unsuspecting victims in crowded areas.”

40. Filch

This term is a verb that means to steal something in a sly or sneaky manner, especially something of small value. “Filch” is often used to describe stealing something without being noticed or caught.

  • For example, “He filched a cookie from the jar when no one was looking.”
  • In a story about a mischievous character, it might be said, “She was known to filch small trinkets from her friends.”
  • A person discussing a stolen pen might say, “I suspect someone filched my favorite pen from my desk.”

41. Pilfer

To pilfer means to steal small amounts or items, often without being noticed or causing suspicion.

  • For example, “The employee pilfered office supplies from the storage room.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw him pilfering money from the cash register.”
  • A parent might accuse their child of pilfering snacks from the pantry.
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42. Cabbage

To cabbage means to steal or take something without permission.

  • For instance, “He cabbaged some money from his friend’s wallet.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might mention, “Shoplifters often cabbage items and try to resell them.”
  • A person might say, “I cabbaged a few cookies from the jar when no one was looking.”

43. Plunder

To plunder means to steal by force or with violence, often during a time of chaos or war.

  • For example, “The invaders plundered the village, taking everything of value.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might mention, “Pirates were notorious for plundering ships and coastal towns.”
  • A person might say, “The rioters used the opportunity to plunder stores and homes.”

44. Heist

A heist refers to a robbery or theft, typically involving detailed planning and execution.

  • For instance, “The gang planned a daring heist on the museum to steal a priceless artifact.”
  • In a conversation about famous criminal activities, someone might bring up, “The Great Train Robbery was one of the most audacious heists in history.”
  • A movie enthusiast might say, “I love watching heist films like Ocean’s Eleven.”

45. Burglarize

To burglarize means to illegally enter a building with the intention of committing theft.

  • For example, “The house was burglarized while the owners were on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about home security, someone might say, “Installing an alarm system can help prevent burglaries.”
  • A person might warn their neighbor, “Be careful, there have been reports of burglaries in the area.”

46. Stick up

This term refers to a robbery where the perpetrator threatens the victim with a firearm or other weapon in order to steal their belongings.

  • For example, “The convenience store was the target of a stick up last night.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “He pulled a stick up and demanded all the cash from the register.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect was arrested for a series of stick ups in the downtown area.”

47. Knock off

To “knock off” in the context of stealing means to take something without permission or to make a replica or counterfeit of a product.

  • For instance, “Someone knocked off my wallet while I wasn’t looking.”
  • A person might say, “I found a knock off version of that designer handbag for a fraction of the price.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might argue, “Copying famous paintings is not art, it’s just knocking off the original.”

48. Fleece

To “fleece” someone means to deceive or cheat them, often by taking their money or possessions through dishonest means.

  • For example, “He was fleeced by a smooth-talking salesman who sold him a fake Rolex.”
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “Watch out for online sellers who try to fleece you with counterfeit products.”
  • A news headline might read, “Investors fleeced out of millions in Ponzi scheme.”

49. Skim

To “skim” in the context of stealing means to take a small amount of money or goods without being noticed.

  • For instance, “The cashier was skimming money from the cash register.”
  • A person might say, “I suspect my roommate has been skimming a few dollars from my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about employee theft, someone might mention, “Some employees try to skim small amounts from the company’s inventory.”

50. Embezzle

To “embezzle” means to fraudulently take money or assets entrusted to one’s care, typically in a professional setting.

  • For example, “The accountant was caught embezzling funds from the company.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “The CEO was charged with embezzling millions of dollars from investors.”
  • A person discussing white-collar crime might say, “Embezzlement is a serious offense that can lead to significant financial losses.”

51. Scam

To deceive or trick someone in order to obtain money or goods dishonestly. It often involves using fraudulent or deceptive practices.

  • For example, “He scammed unsuspecting individuals by selling fake concert tickets.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Be careful of online scams that promise quick and easy money.”
  • In a discussion about financial fraud, one might say, “Scammers often target vulnerable populations, such as the elderly.”

52. Swindle

To cheat or deceive someone in order to obtain money or property dishonestly. It involves using cunning or deceitful tactics.

  • For instance, “He swindled his business partner out of thousands of dollars.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I was swindled by a smooth-talking salesman who sold me a faulty product.”
  • In a conversation about scams, one might say, “Many people fall victim to swindlers who promise unrealistic returns on investments.”

53. Thieve

To steal or take something dishonestly without permission or legal right. It is a colloquial term for the act of stealing.

  • For example, “He thieved money from his roommate’s wallet while they were asleep.”
  • A person might confess, “I used to thieve small items from convenience stores when I was younger.”
  • In a discussion about crime, one might say, “Thieving is a common problem in densely populated urban areas.”

54. Pickpocket

To steal someone’s wallet, money, or other valuables from their pocket or bag, typically in a crowded public place without their knowledge. It involves skillful and discreet theft.

  • For instance, “The pickpocket targeted unsuspecting tourists in crowded train stations.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I was pickpocketed while walking through a busy market.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, one might say, “Be aware of pickpockets in crowded areas and keep your belongings secure.”

55. Hold up

To rob or steal from someone by using threats or force. It often involves brandishing a weapon or making intimidating demands.

  • For example, “The masked robber held up the bank and demanded cash.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Avoid walking alone in secluded areas to reduce the risk of being held up.”
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, one might say, “Installing security cameras can help deter hold-ups and provide evidence for investigations.”

56. Stickup

A “stickup” refers to a robbery or theft that involves the use of a firearm or the threat of force. It typically involves a person demanding money or valuables from another person or establishment.

  • For example, “The convenience store was the target of a stickup last night.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “The suspect was arrested for multiple stickups in the area.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “I can’t believe he survived a stickup like that.”

57. Grift

To “grift” means to engage in fraudulent or deceptive behavior in order to obtain money or valuables. It is often associated with con artists or swindlers who use clever schemes to trick people out of their belongings or funds.

  • For instance, “He grifted his way into the wealthy family’s trust and stole their fortune.”
  • In a discussion about scams, one might say, “Watch out for online grifts that promise quick riches.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I fell victim to a grift while traveling abroad.”

58. Hustle

In the context of stealing, “hustle” refers to the act of engaging in illegal or dishonest activities in order to obtain money or goods. It can also refer to swindling or deceiving others for personal gain.

  • For example, “He hustled his way into a high-end party and stole valuable items.”
  • In a conversation about street crime, one might say, “The city has seen an increase in hustles targeting tourists.”
  • A person discussing a clever theft might say, “That was quite a hustle they pulled off.”